17 Songs, 59 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded on the night of Nov. 29, 2004, at The Mean Fiddler in London, When London Burns captures Deicide at a decisive moment in their career. Just five days before this concert, founding guitarists Brian and Eric Hoffman quit the band, leaving the death metal stalwarts without a front line. Rather than cancel the tour, they quickly hired two of the genre’s most respected players—Dave Suzuki (of Vital Remains) and Jack Owen (of Cannibal Corpse)—and channeled all their frustration into this performance. With their total commitment to aggression, bands like Deicide are always best when they have something to prove. This recording shows drummer Steve Asheim and vocalist/bassist Glen Benton obliterating any notion that the machine they’d built was dependent on the Hoffmans to function. The versions of classic songs like “Dead by Dawn,” “Oblivious to Evil,” and “Dead but Dreaming” are simply astonishing, propelled by a fiery and almost uncontrollable willpower. The best moment of the night goes to “Scars of the Crucifix.” It was last classic song Deicide wrote with the Hoffmans, but this version opens all new dimensions of malevolence.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded on the night of Nov. 29, 2004, at The Mean Fiddler in London, When London Burns captures Deicide at a decisive moment in their career. Just five days before this concert, founding guitarists Brian and Eric Hoffman quit the band, leaving the death metal stalwarts without a front line. Rather than cancel the tour, they quickly hired two of the genre’s most respected players—Dave Suzuki (of Vital Remains) and Jack Owen (of Cannibal Corpse)—and channeled all their frustration into this performance. With their total commitment to aggression, bands like Deicide are always best when they have something to prove. This recording shows drummer Steve Asheim and vocalist/bassist Glen Benton obliterating any notion that the machine they’d built was dependent on the Hoffmans to function. The versions of classic songs like “Dead by Dawn,” “Oblivious to Evil,” and “Dead but Dreaming” are simply astonishing, propelled by a fiery and almost uncontrollable willpower. The best moment of the night goes to “Scars of the Crucifix.” It was last classic song Deicide wrote with the Hoffmans, but this version opens all new dimensions of malevolence.

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About Deicide

Controversy has plagued Florida-based quartet Deicide. During their first tour in 1992, the band was severely criticized for their statements in favor of animal sacrifices. Their Stockholm, Sweden, concert was canceled after four songs when a bomb was discovered on-stage. Led by vocalist/bass player Glen Benton, Deicide has delivered some of the goriest sounds to ever emanate from the Sunshine State. Their songs continue to radiate with the brutal attack of satanic death metal.

Formed in 1987, Deicide quickly released two demos -- Feasting the Beast in 1987 and Sacrificial in 1989 -- under the name Amon. Signing with Roadrunner Records, they changed their name and released their first full-length CD, featuring all six demo tracks, in 1990. They didn't tour until releasing their second album, Legion, in 1992. A string of albums followed, including Amon: Feasting the Beast (1993), Once Upon the Cross (1995), Serpents of the Light (1997), the live When Satan Lives (1998), Insineratehymn (2000), In Torment, In Hell (2001), Scars of the Crucifix (2004), and Stench of Redemption (2006). Deicide's Till Death Do Us Part was released on Earache Records in April 2008. ~ Craig Harris

GENRE
Rock
FORMED
1987

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