17 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Deicide’s music was so technically precise that longtime fans had a right to be doubtful that it could ever accurately translate to a live album. 1998’s When Satan Lives proved the naysayers wrong. Recorded in one hot August night at Chicago's House of Blues, this live set is even tighter and more intense than the band’s famously hellacious studio albums. Much credit is due engineer Steve Remote, a mobile production specialist who had worked with Gil Evans, Denis Leary, and Hall & Oates, among hundreds of others. Remote wasn't necessarily a metal fan but he still ended up giving Deicide what might be the best-sounding album of their career. Every song comes off loud and full and in-your-face, as if the band have the listener completely surrounded at every turn. Even lifelong death metal experts will hear “Dead by Dawn” and “Sacrificial Suicide” in a new light. Of course, the engineering only serves to highlight the band’s impeccable playing. They never miss a beat, pushed forward by Steve Asheim's maniacally aerobic drumming.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Deicide’s music was so technically precise that longtime fans had a right to be doubtful that it could ever accurately translate to a live album. 1998’s When Satan Lives proved the naysayers wrong. Recorded in one hot August night at Chicago's House of Blues, this live set is even tighter and more intense than the band’s famously hellacious studio albums. Much credit is due engineer Steve Remote, a mobile production specialist who had worked with Gil Evans, Denis Leary, and Hall & Oates, among hundreds of others. Remote wasn't necessarily a metal fan but he still ended up giving Deicide what might be the best-sounding album of their career. Every song comes off loud and full and in-your-face, as if the band have the listener completely surrounded at every turn. Even lifelong death metal experts will hear “Dead by Dawn” and “Sacrificial Suicide” in a new light. Of course, the engineering only serves to highlight the band’s impeccable playing. They never miss a beat, pushed forward by Steve Asheim's maniacally aerobic drumming.

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About Deicide

Controversy has plagued Florida-based quartet Deicide. During their first tour in 1992, the band was severely criticized for their statements in favor of animal sacrifices. Their Stockholm, Sweden, concert was canceled after four songs when a bomb was discovered on-stage. Led by vocalist/bass player Glen Benton, Deicide has delivered some of the goriest sounds to ever emanate from the Sunshine State. Their songs continue to radiate with the brutal attack of satanic death metal.

Formed in 1987, Deicide quickly released two demos -- Feasting the Beast in 1987 and Sacrificial in 1989 -- under the name Amon. Signing with Roadrunner Records, they changed their name and released their first full-length CD, featuring all six demo tracks, in 1990. They didn't tour until releasing their second album, Legion, in 1992. A string of albums followed, including Amon: Feasting the Beast (1993), Once Upon the Cross (1995), Serpents of the Light (1997), the live When Satan Lives (1998), Insineratehymn (2000), In Torment, In Hell (2001), Scars of the Crucifix (2004), and Stench of Redemption (2006). Deicide's Till Death Do Us Part was released on Earache Records in April 2008. ~ Craig Harris

GENRE
Rock
FORMED
1987

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