13 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Faith Hill aside, no one has come close to claiming Reba McEntire’s queenly throne since she de-emphasized her country music career in favor of other pursuits. Her ability to combine vocal dramatics with a sense of vulnerability remains unequalled — so why not celebrate the fact in the company of her peers? This seems to be the idea behind Reba Duets, an album pairing her with a surprising variety of talents from the country, rock and pop realms. The results are mostly top-notch, due to shrewd choices in material and masterful performances by Reba and her partners. As might be expected, McEntire teams up well with Ronnie Dunn on the Southwestern-styled “Does The Wind Still Blow In Oklahoma?” and finds the tender spot within “These Broken Hearts” in tandem with Vince Gill. More eyebrow-raising are match-ups with Justin Timberlake (the wistful “The Only Promise That Remains”) and Carole King (the buoyant “Everyday People”). Reba soars highest in the company of Trisha Yearwood (“She Can’t Save Him”) and LeAnn Rimes (“When You Love Someone Like That”). Reba Duets finds McEntire in truly distinguished company — though, in the end, there’s only one queen.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Faith Hill aside, no one has come close to claiming Reba McEntire’s queenly throne since she de-emphasized her country music career in favor of other pursuits. Her ability to combine vocal dramatics with a sense of vulnerability remains unequalled — so why not celebrate the fact in the company of her peers? This seems to be the idea behind Reba Duets, an album pairing her with a surprising variety of talents from the country, rock and pop realms. The results are mostly top-notch, due to shrewd choices in material and masterful performances by Reba and her partners. As might be expected, McEntire teams up well with Ronnie Dunn on the Southwestern-styled “Does The Wind Still Blow In Oklahoma?” and finds the tender spot within “These Broken Hearts” in tandem with Vince Gill. More eyebrow-raising are match-ups with Justin Timberlake (the wistful “The Only Promise That Remains”) and Carole King (the buoyant “Everyday People”). Reba soars highest in the company of Trisha Yearwood (“She Can’t Save Him”) and LeAnn Rimes (“When You Love Someone Like That”). Reba Duets finds McEntire in truly distinguished company — though, in the end, there’s only one queen.

TITLE TIME
12

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