14 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Parisian producer David Guetta’s follow-up to the crossover success of 2009’s One Love is noticeably more based in the retro tones of bygone synthcore, while also boasting an impressive roster of A-list guests. Nicki Minaj and Flo Rida are awash in a Jacuzzi of Auto-Tune effects in the opening showstopper, “Where Them Girls At,” before stepping out to bust some hyper-phrased rhymes over Guetta’s quiver of vintage arcade keyboards and beats. Taio Cruz and Ludacris swap melodies and rhymes over wonky synths that sound like classic Nintendo systems. Snoop Dogg coos through robotic filters alongside some studio wizardry in the sultry standout “Sweat,” as Guetta rubs crisp rhythms against the grain of lo-fi Casiotone notes and murky underwater beats. In the Daft Punk–flavored “Without You,” the marriage of Usher’s smooth tenor and Guetta’s penchant for digging up analog textures delivers the album’s brightest gem.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Parisian producer David Guetta’s follow-up to the crossover success of 2009’s One Love is noticeably more based in the retro tones of bygone synthcore, while also boasting an impressive roster of A-list guests. Nicki Minaj and Flo Rida are awash in a Jacuzzi of Auto-Tune effects in the opening showstopper, “Where Them Girls At,” before stepping out to bust some hyper-phrased rhymes over Guetta’s quiver of vintage arcade keyboards and beats. Taio Cruz and Ludacris swap melodies and rhymes over wonky synths that sound like classic Nintendo systems. Snoop Dogg coos through robotic filters alongside some studio wizardry in the sultry standout “Sweat,” as Guetta rubs crisp rhythms against the grain of lo-fi Casiotone notes and murky underwater beats. In the Daft Punk–flavored “Without You,” the marriage of Usher’s smooth tenor and Guetta’s penchant for digging up analog textures delivers the album’s brightest gem.

TITLE TIME
4

About David Guetta

From his early days playing Chicago house in French discotheques to his long reign atop the pop charts, David Guetta has revolutionized dance music multiple times. Born in Paris in 1967, Guetta began DJing in the late ’80s, when the shimmery sound known as the “French touch” was taking shape. By the early 2000s, at his F*** Me I’m Famous parties in Ibiza, he had translated that melodic style into a clever merger of pop sass and club swagger. He parlayed that mix into pure platinum with hits like 2003’s “Just for One Day,” an energy-stoking rework of David Bowie’s “Heroes,” and 2002’s “Just a Little More Love,” a sultry bump-and-grind featuring R&B singer Chris Willis. That versatility—along with a knack for killer hooks—would become one of Guetta’s principal calling cards, and as EDM exploded across pop culture at the end of the 2000s, Guetta’s shapeshifting style led the way, yielding ecstatic affirmations (“When Love Takes Over”), feisty come-ons (“Sexy Bitch”), and unstoppable singalongs (The Black Eyed Peas’ “I Gotta Feeling,” which Guetta produced). Since then, his collaborations (Sia, Nicki Minaj) have kept listeners guessing even as his choruses—triumphant as a bottle of bubbly blowing its top—have proven one of pop’s most dependable pleasures.

HOMETOWN
Paris, France
GENRE
Dance
BORN
November 7, 1967

Songs

Albums

Videos

Listeners Also Played