14 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With My Krazy Life, YG throws gasoline on ratchet music with the emergent genre's best album to date, transforming the regional sound into a bona fide movement. Ratchet—the hypnotic, skeletal, trunk-rattling aesthetic pioneered by L.A. producer DJ Mustard—has its antecedent in SoCal G-funk and the Bay Area's hyphy sound, and now it finally has its The Chronic. Like Kendrick Lamar's good kid m.A.A.d. City, My Krazy Life is a brooding concept album, detailing YG's crazy days, wild nights, and regretful mornings hustling the streets of Compton, where "Daddy told me never leave the house without my tool." With guests Schoolboy Q, Kendrick, Drake, Young Jeezy, and Rich Homie Quan among others, the album doesn't hurt for star power. Yet YG never cedes the spotlight. His slippery flow bobs and weaves around Mustard and his cohorts' haymaker basslines and jabbing percussion. While "I Just Wanna Party" clearly lays out the rapper's intentions, "Really Be (Smokin N Drinkin)" finds YG contemplating his Dionysian ways, and "Sorry Momma" is the repentant confessional that brings this watershed debut full circle.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With My Krazy Life, YG throws gasoline on ratchet music with the emergent genre's best album to date, transforming the regional sound into a bona fide movement. Ratchet—the hypnotic, skeletal, trunk-rattling aesthetic pioneered by L.A. producer DJ Mustard—has its antecedent in SoCal G-funk and the Bay Area's hyphy sound, and now it finally has its The Chronic. Like Kendrick Lamar's good kid m.A.A.d. City, My Krazy Life is a brooding concept album, detailing YG's crazy days, wild nights, and regretful mornings hustling the streets of Compton, where "Daddy told me never leave the house without my tool." With guests Schoolboy Q, Kendrick, Drake, Young Jeezy, and Rich Homie Quan among others, the album doesn't hurt for star power. Yet YG never cedes the spotlight. His slippery flow bobs and weaves around Mustard and his cohorts' haymaker basslines and jabbing percussion. While "I Just Wanna Party" clearly lays out the rapper's intentions, "Really Be (Smokin N Drinkin)" finds YG contemplating his Dionysian ways, and "Sorry Momma" is the repentant confessional that brings this watershed debut full circle.

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