15 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

John Sayles’ 2008 film, Honeydripper, set in rural Alabama in 1950, follows the plight of piano player Tyrone “Pine Top” Purvis (Danny Glover) and his struggling nightclub, the Honeydripper Lounge. Sayles uses a mix of old and new songs and musicians to set his scenes, relying on well-regarded and emerging Texas actor / musician Gary Clark Jr. for several pivotal numbers, including “China Doll,” a tune co-written by Sayles. The film’s star, Danny Glover, delivers a satisfactory “Goin’ Down Slow,” while Keb’ Mo’ updates the blues classic “Stack O Lee” and Memphis Stax soul legend Mable John turns in a new performance with “No Matter How She Done It.” The late Ruth Brown issues what became her final recording, Tampa Red’s “Things About Coming My Way.” Hank Williams’ “Move It On Over,” a honky-tonk country standard, set the blueprint for the soon to emerge rock n’ roll era and Memphis Slim’s “Bertha May” serves as classic blues. In his every film, Sayles has stayed true to its era. This is a well thought-out collection of country, blues and gospel that respects the music of the late 1940s and early 1950s while employing practitioners from all corners.

EDITORS’ NOTES

John Sayles’ 2008 film, Honeydripper, set in rural Alabama in 1950, follows the plight of piano player Tyrone “Pine Top” Purvis (Danny Glover) and his struggling nightclub, the Honeydripper Lounge. Sayles uses a mix of old and new songs and musicians to set his scenes, relying on well-regarded and emerging Texas actor / musician Gary Clark Jr. for several pivotal numbers, including “China Doll,” a tune co-written by Sayles. The film’s star, Danny Glover, delivers a satisfactory “Goin’ Down Slow,” while Keb’ Mo’ updates the blues classic “Stack O Lee” and Memphis Stax soul legend Mable John turns in a new performance with “No Matter How She Done It.” The late Ruth Brown issues what became her final recording, Tampa Red’s “Things About Coming My Way.” Hank Williams’ “Move It On Over,” a honky-tonk country standard, set the blueprint for the soon to emerge rock n’ roll era and Memphis Slim’s “Bertha May” serves as classic blues. In his every film, Sayles has stayed true to its era. This is a well thought-out collection of country, blues and gospel that respects the music of the late 1940s and early 1950s while employing practitioners from all corners.

TITLE TIME
1:27
2:23
4:34
3:09
2:44
2:58
2:02
2:01
4:16
6:51
3:36
4:29
2:59
3:44
4:26

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