Wig Out At Jagbags by Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks on Apple Music

13 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

By 2014, Stephen Malkmus’ solo career has casually strolled for longer than his original band, Pavement, put in the effort. By keeping the music relatively light and his lyrics closer to epigrams than emotionally invested state-of-the-personal-union addresses, Malkmus and his solid (if somewhat anonymous) backing band sway through songs littered with quirky references (naturally) and jammy-indie-classic rock guitar riffs just a mite flashier than anything Pavement tried. “Shibboleth” sounds like Pavement crossed with The Grateful Dead in under three minutes, while “Lariat” throws The Byrds into the equation. “J Smoov” employs a trumpet solo over a plaintive backing. The key ingredient is the same as it’s ever been with Malkmus: witty detachment. A perfect example is how “Rumble at the Rainbo” pokes playful fun at the mania of the hardcore punk days by playing the music several volume notches removed from the real thing. “Chartjunk” picks up the pace with a brass section feeding the frenzy. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

By 2014, Stephen Malkmus’ solo career has casually strolled for longer than his original band, Pavement, put in the effort. By keeping the music relatively light and his lyrics closer to epigrams than emotionally invested state-of-the-personal-union addresses, Malkmus and his solid (if somewhat anonymous) backing band sway through songs littered with quirky references (naturally) and jammy-indie-classic rock guitar riffs just a mite flashier than anything Pavement tried. “Shibboleth” sounds like Pavement crossed with The Grateful Dead in under three minutes, while “Lariat” throws The Byrds into the equation. “J Smoov” employs a trumpet solo over a plaintive backing. The key ingredient is the same as it’s ever been with Malkmus: witty detachment. A perfect example is how “Rumble at the Rainbo” pokes playful fun at the mania of the hardcore punk days by playing the music several volume notches removed from the real thing. “Chartjunk” picks up the pace with a brass section feeding the frenzy. 

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3:34
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4:45
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5:06
1:41
3:48
3:00
1:53
3:00
5:38

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