14 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Wildlife is a more cathartic album than La Dispute’s 2008 debut, Somewhere at the Bottom of the River Between Vega and Altair. In “A Departure,” the mood is instantly darkened by detuned guitars and rumbling rhythms while Jordan Dreyer reads a crazed letter aloud, as though somebody had to hold it up for him because of the confining straightjacket. "Harder Harmonies” is where post-hardcore collides with noise rock as Dreyer verbalizes the kind of intensely disturbing thoughts that would give most people anxiety attacks. “St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church Blues” is the first song here where Dreyer eschews yelling for actually singing something melodic. But even in those euphonic moments, he’s singing about suicide, unemployment, cancer, and murder. Wildlife is unapologetically self-absorbed. But somehow, the same kind of hyper-narcissistic personality that would repel most people is like a car crash here. When Dreyer rips his heart out in songs like “A Broken Jar,” you can’t help but slow down and look.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Wildlife is a more cathartic album than La Dispute’s 2008 debut, Somewhere at the Bottom of the River Between Vega and Altair. In “A Departure,” the mood is instantly darkened by detuned guitars and rumbling rhythms while Jordan Dreyer reads a crazed letter aloud, as though somebody had to hold it up for him because of the confining straightjacket. "Harder Harmonies” is where post-hardcore collides with noise rock as Dreyer verbalizes the kind of intensely disturbing thoughts that would give most people anxiety attacks. “St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church Blues” is the first song here where Dreyer eschews yelling for actually singing something melodic. But even in those euphonic moments, he’s singing about suicide, unemployment, cancer, and murder. Wildlife is unapologetically self-absorbed. But somehow, the same kind of hyper-narcissistic personality that would repel most people is like a car crash here. When Dreyer rips his heart out in songs like “A Broken Jar,” you can’t help but slow down and look.

TITLE TIME
3:32
3:35
3:46
2:55
3:49
4:36
3:55
2:59
6:54
5:44
3:37
2:19
5:04
4:56

About La Dispute

Grand Rapids, Michigan-based post-hardcore band La Dispute formed in 2004, made up of cousins Jordan Dreyer and Brad Vander Lugt (on vocals and drums, respectively) with friends Kevin Whittemore and Derek Sterenberg on guitars and Adam Kool on bass. The band played locally before releasing debut EP Vancouver in 2006. Shortly after, Sterenberg was replaced by his brother Chad. Adam Vass joined the band in 2007, replacing Kool on bass. Dreyer's lyrics and vocal style lean toward the spoken word style of his written poetry and prose, finding a space between stream-of-consciousness fluidity and imagery of everyday life. Following their debut EP, La Dispute released the albums Somewhere at the Bottom of the River Between Vega and Altair in 2008 and Wildlife in 2011. Between albums, the band issued a series of 7" releases entitled Hear, Here, which focused on more experimental material. Their third album, Rooms of the House, materialized in 2014. ~ Fred Thomas

  • ORIGIN
    Grand Rapids, MI
  • FORMED
    2004

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