9 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The humble Americana folk-rock musings of Big Eagle are quite a departure from San Francisco singer Robyn Miller’s former garage/glam rock band, The Peels, whose 2005 Dim Mak release pulsed with a polished production poised for radio. While her husky voice and dynamic range worked well with The Peels’ penchant for womanly wrangled rock ‘n’ roll, 2011’s Willow Creek reveals that Miller’s earthy inflections are much more suited to sing the rootsy stuff. There’s a ‘70s Fleetwood Mac kind of elegance that resonates throughout, starting with the catchy “Anywhere The Wind Blows,” a summery slice of wistful melancholia trimmed tastefully with the warm tones of old Wurlitzer keys, brushed snare-drum, acoustic guitars and cascading vocal harmonies. The lonely banjo notes plucked in “Broken Heart” sound perfectly tailored to fit alongside Miller’s lovelorn laments, where the palpable ache in her textured voice recalls moments of the late Karen Dalton’s brilliance. Berkeley bard Bart Davenport lends some soulful backing vocals on the twangy “Out Of Death” and the more playful “For Sale,” a welcome addition to the canon of West Coast canyon-rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The humble Americana folk-rock musings of Big Eagle are quite a departure from San Francisco singer Robyn Miller’s former garage/glam rock band, The Peels, whose 2005 Dim Mak release pulsed with a polished production poised for radio. While her husky voice and dynamic range worked well with The Peels’ penchant for womanly wrangled rock ‘n’ roll, 2011’s Willow Creek reveals that Miller’s earthy inflections are much more suited to sing the rootsy stuff. There’s a ‘70s Fleetwood Mac kind of elegance that resonates throughout, starting with the catchy “Anywhere The Wind Blows,” a summery slice of wistful melancholia trimmed tastefully with the warm tones of old Wurlitzer keys, brushed snare-drum, acoustic guitars and cascading vocal harmonies. The lonely banjo notes plucked in “Broken Heart” sound perfectly tailored to fit alongside Miller’s lovelorn laments, where the palpable ache in her textured voice recalls moments of the late Karen Dalton’s brilliance. Berkeley bard Bart Davenport lends some soulful backing vocals on the twangy “Out Of Death” and the more playful “For Sale,” a welcome addition to the canon of West Coast canyon-rock.

TITLE TIME
3:27
4:12
5:25
2:33
3:19
3:21
4:34
2:34
3:18

Songs

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