11 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After a 1974 tour with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, it only made sense that David Crosby and Graham Nash carry on and make their second album as a duo. Just because the members of CSN&Y rarely got along didn’t mean that the rich blending of Crosby and Nash’s voices should go to waste. This was 1975, and the two gents were now a little older. The music reflected that; it’s an album as gentle as its title. The songs play off a dynamic of Nash’s sing-along pop (listen to “Love Work Out” and “Cowboy of Dreams”) and Crosby’s more figurative turns. It’s rich with themes of death (the beautiful “Carry Me” about the passing of Crosby’s mother), music-biz thievery (“Take the Money and Run,” which features David Lindley’s wonderful violin), the fruitless search for emotional security (the slow-rising “Homeward Through the Haze,” complete with references to Samson and Caesar), and the environment (“To the Last Whale: I. Critical Mass: II. Wind on the Water”). Guests include Jackson Browne, James Taylor, and Carole King, as well as unheralded pedal steel player Ben Keith and The Band’s Levon Helm.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After a 1974 tour with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, it only made sense that David Crosby and Graham Nash carry on and make their second album as a duo. Just because the members of CSN&Y rarely got along didn’t mean that the rich blending of Crosby and Nash’s voices should go to waste. This was 1975, and the two gents were now a little older. The music reflected that; it’s an album as gentle as its title. The songs play off a dynamic of Nash’s sing-along pop (listen to “Love Work Out” and “Cowboy of Dreams”) and Crosby’s more figurative turns. It’s rich with themes of death (the beautiful “Carry Me” about the passing of Crosby’s mother), music-biz thievery (“Take the Money and Run,” which features David Lindley’s wonderful violin), the fruitless search for emotional security (the slow-rising “Homeward Through the Haze,” complete with references to Samson and Caesar), and the environment (“To the Last Whale: I. Critical Mass: II. Wind on the Water”). Guests include Jackson Browne, James Taylor, and Carole King, as well as unheralded pedal steel player Ben Keith and The Band’s Levon Helm.

TITLE TIME

About David Crosby

Though David Crosby’s gossamer harmonies helped define the take-it-easy era of Laurel Canyon singer/songwriters, his seemingly gentle tunes also grapple with massive cultural upheaval and his own personal traumas. The Los Angeles native started shaping the early-’60s folk-rock hits of The Byrds with his chiming (and endlessly copied) guitar melodies, and he helped push the band toward its psychedelic inclinations with the serpentine-but-snarling "Eight Miles High." By the late ’60s, Crosby had formed a partnership with Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, and Neil Young—all exemplars of the Woodstock era’s quieter but no less impactful non-rock side. Uniting in various formations over the decades to come, the quartet's lilting music captures the essence of rockers suddenly grasping toward domestic bliss, makes utter romantic devastation sound downright lovely, and occasionally flashes a sharp political edge, notably on Crosby's surprisingly tough-minded anthem of hippie pride "Almost Cut My Hair." In his solo career, he's explored the mental and emotional fallout of the peace-and-love generation, veering from hallucinatory song-suites to intimate confessionals—which have in turn been reclaimed by indie rockers like Fleet Foxes and Bon Iver, who also sought to blur the line between psychedelic experimentation and candid folk.

HOMETOWN
Los Angeles, CA
GENRE
Rock
BORN
August 14, 1941

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