36 Songs, 4 Hours 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Drawn from six intense shows recorded over three days – October 10, 11, 12, 1968–at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom just as the landmark double album Electric Ladyland was released, Winterland is an in-depth look at the legendary guitarist at the peak of his powers. Despite the fact that many songs are repeated in the different performances, Hendrix was such a master musician that every version has something new to hear. Highlights include the 10/10/68 recording of “Hear My Train A-Comin’,” the 10/11/68 rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone” and the 10/12/68 recording of “Spanish Castle Magic.” It is a testament to the man’s genius that though he was only a star for little more than three years, there is still so much music to explore. The guitar and his music were his life and that is clearly evident in the inventive guitar voicings and out-of-this-world arrangements. Whether he’s exploding the 12-bar blues of “Red House,” cranking up the amps for the slam-bang of Chip Taylor’s “Wild Thing,” piecing back together “The Star Spangled Banner” or ripping through “Purple Haze,” Hendrix treats it like he’s playing for his survival.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Drawn from six intense shows recorded over three days – October 10, 11, 12, 1968–at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom just as the landmark double album Electric Ladyland was released, Winterland is an in-depth look at the legendary guitarist at the peak of his powers. Despite the fact that many songs are repeated in the different performances, Hendrix was such a master musician that every version has something new to hear. Highlights include the 10/10/68 recording of “Hear My Train A-Comin’,” the 10/11/68 rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone” and the 10/12/68 recording of “Spanish Castle Magic.” It is a testament to the man’s genius that though he was only a star for little more than three years, there is still so much music to explore. The guitar and his music were his life and that is clearly evident in the inventive guitar voicings and out-of-this-world arrangements. Whether he’s exploding the 12-bar blues of “Red House,” cranking up the amps for the slam-bang of Chip Taylor’s “Wild Thing,” piecing back together “The Star Spangled Banner” or ripping through “Purple Haze,” Hendrix treats it like he’s playing for his survival.

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