11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On her 2005 debut Anna Nalick prefers to simmer rather than scorch her way through a set of emotionally conflicted compositions. At 20, this California singer/songwriter shows a firm command of her craft, tossing off intricate wordplay and vivid imagery with ease. Damaged romance is a frequent concern, with the slightly countrified “Breathe (2 AM)” and the moody, rock-slanted “Bleed” cutting especially deep. Nalick has a knack for light, slippery grooves, coming across as a more playful Fiona Apple on shuffling tunes like “Citadel” and “Consider This.” She largely avoids melodrama in favor of interior exploration — “Paper Bag” and “Catalyst” probe tormented relations with a feel for minute detail. While most of the tracks here are folk-pop, “Forever Love (Digame)” allows Nalick to put on the elegant airs of a jazz chanteuse. Best of all is the title song (heard here in two versions), a brooding account of obsession and acceptance set to a woozy, smoldering melody. In the end, Nalick makes even her painful confessions sound life affirming.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On her 2005 debut Anna Nalick prefers to simmer rather than scorch her way through a set of emotionally conflicted compositions. At 20, this California singer/songwriter shows a firm command of her craft, tossing off intricate wordplay and vivid imagery with ease. Damaged romance is a frequent concern, with the slightly countrified “Breathe (2 AM)” and the moody, rock-slanted “Bleed” cutting especially deep. Nalick has a knack for light, slippery grooves, coming across as a more playful Fiona Apple on shuffling tunes like “Citadel” and “Consider This.” She largely avoids melodrama in favor of interior exploration — “Paper Bag” and “Catalyst” probe tormented relations with a feel for minute detail. While most of the tracks here are folk-pop, “Forever Love (Digame)” allows Nalick to put on the elegant airs of a jazz chanteuse. Best of all is the title song (heard here in two versions), a brooding account of obsession and acceptance set to a woozy, smoldering melody. In the end, Nalick makes even her painful confessions sound life affirming.

TITLE TIME
4:39
2:47
3:27
4:06
4:00
3:17
4:10
4:07
3:56
3:39
3:36

About Anna Nalick

Her love of the Cranberries, John Mayer, and Fiona Apple is easy to hear when one listens to the poignant music of singer/songwriter Anna Nalick, but it's her beloved Blind Melon that had the most impact on her career. The California native had been recording demos on a cheap cassette recorder when one of her tapes ended up in the hands of former Blind Melon members Christopher Thorn and Brad Smith. The two were now a production team and with Eric Rosse -- a producer who had worked with another Nalick fave, Tori Amos -- they re-recorded her home demos in a professional studio. Two weeks later, Columbia Records contacted Nalick with an offer and soon college was put on hold. With an all-star cast of studio musicians, the 20-year-old recorded her debut, Wreck of the Day, released in April of 2005. An expanded version of the album was released in 2006, with the Shine EP following in 2008. ~ David Jeffries

  • ORIGIN
    Glendora, CA
  • BORN
    March 30, 1984

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