11 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“For the better part of a decade, fans have been asking me to make moombahton again,” Dillon Francis tells Apple Music. "I wanted to give back.” The Los Angeles DJ/producer, known for his animated social media presence and silly sense of humor, hasn’t always made FM dance-pop with guests like G-Eazy and Kygo. Prior to his 2014 album, Money Sucks, Friends Rule, Francis was one of moombahton’s early ambassadors, working alongside Dave Nada and Diplo to bring the D.C.-area subgenre—a hybrid of dancehall and Dutch house that hovers at around 108 BPM—to the wider world. (Francis says the rhythms resonated with him after growing up around LA’s Latin community.) They more than succeeded; as superstars like Justin Bieber, DJ Snake, and Drake all tried Afro-Caribbean-inspired dance-music grooves on for size, the sound became a defining element of contemporary pop.

Great news, then, that Francis has looped back around to where he started. Drawing inspiration from his early hit “Que Que,” a 2011 collaboration with Diplo and Maluca, Wut Wut crosses between English and Spanish (“White Boi” featuring Lao Ra), and plays with vocals as instruments (“Bababa” featuring Young Ash). Those who’ve ridden with Francis from the beginning will lose their minds over "Ven," a rowdy dancehall-trap torpedo with an irresistible lean. “At first I worried too much Spanish might alienate fans who don’t speak the language,” he says, “but at the end of the day, you just need to feel it."

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“For the better part of a decade, fans have been asking me to make moombahton again,” Dillon Francis tells Apple Music. "I wanted to give back.” The Los Angeles DJ/producer, known for his animated social media presence and silly sense of humor, hasn’t always made FM dance-pop with guests like G-Eazy and Kygo. Prior to his 2014 album, Money Sucks, Friends Rule, Francis was one of moombahton’s early ambassadors, working alongside Dave Nada and Diplo to bring the D.C.-area subgenre—a hybrid of dancehall and Dutch house that hovers at around 108 BPM—to the wider world. (Francis says the rhythms resonated with him after growing up around LA’s Latin community.) They more than succeeded; as superstars like Justin Bieber, DJ Snake, and Drake all tried Afro-Caribbean-inspired dance-music grooves on for size, the sound became a defining element of contemporary pop.

Great news, then, that Francis has looped back around to where he started. Drawing inspiration from his early hit “Que Que,” a 2011 collaboration with Diplo and Maluca, Wut Wut crosses between English and Spanish (“White Boi” featuring Lao Ra), and plays with vocals as instruments (“Bababa” featuring Young Ash). Those who’ve ridden with Francis from the beginning will lose their minds over "Ven," a rowdy dancehall-trap torpedo with an irresistible lean. “At first I worried too much Spanish might alienate fans who don’t speak the language,” he says, “but at the end of the day, you just need to feel it."

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

3.4 out of 5
27 Ratings
27 Ratings
TheJaybirdOffical

Musical Growth

For all the people who are bashing this album because it’s in Spanish, you really gotta stop being so close-minded. I agree, Dillon’s old stuff is unique and I’m a huge fan of it all. However, if he always made the same exact content, it would eventually get old and everyone would talk about how “washed up” and boring him and his music are. I respect Dillon for changing it up and keeping it fresh as an evolving artist! 👏🙏

incakola

It’s like getting a Major Lazer album!!

Straight fire

Nick2002

White boi stay with ya

Love a white boi

About Dillon Francis

You could call Dillon Francis the court jester of EDM — if his productions didn’t hit quite so hard. Ever since the DJ/producer emerged in the early 2010s with a string of stunning, bass-heavy tracks on three of the genre's most influential labels (Diplo’s Mad Decent, Skrillex’s OWSLA, and A-Trak’s Fool’s Gold), he’s made gleeful irreverence a key part of his brand, from the raised middle finger on the cover of his single “I.D.G.A.F.O.S”—an acronym he later reclaimed as the name of his own imprint—to comedic alter egos like DJ Hanzel, Francis’ “Sprockets”-inspired house alias. The L.A. native (born in 1987) broke through at a moment when everything in dance music seemed to be in flux: Dubstep was making inroads in the U.S. and trap music was making the leap from hip-hop to the electronic scene. This suited him perfectly—like his mentors and label bosses, Francis has seemed most at ease when reinventing rave from the ground up, and he’s never shown much interest in conforming to any one style. His 2011 Westside! EP flits between the slow, funky grooves of moombahton and big-room house suffused in “dirty Dutch” squeals; from there he’s continued to experiment, tackling tropical house (“Hello There”), dubstep/synth-pop fusion (“Falling Up”), indie dance (“Anywhere”), and steel-toothed trap (“Get Low,” his earth-shattering collaboration with DJ Snake).

HOMETOWN
Los Angeles, CA
GENRE
Dance
BORN
October 5, 1987

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