10 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Adventures In Coverland finds this San Antonio-based female trio ripping into a wide swath of rock, pop, Latin, and country material with gusto. The group acknowledges their affinity for ‘80s British rock by working up a minimalist, finger-snapping take on Joy Division’s “Transmission” and a moody rendering of David Bowie’s “As the World Falls Down.” The Beatles’ “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and Patsy Cline’s “Walkin’ After Midnight” are roughed up with Nina Diaz’s brawny guitar work, while the drama within Selena’s “Si una Vez” is heightened to tormented extremes. Especially revelatory are the treatments given to Richie Valens’ “Come On, Let’s Go,” the Velvet Underground’s “Femme Fatale” and Buffalo Springfield’s “For What It’s Worth.” Diaz struts and snarls her way through these tunes with the defiant charisma of a young Chrissie Hynde, backed by the ferocious playing of bandmates Jenn Alva and Phanie Diaz. The album is nicely rounded out by the tough-yet-tender new original “Yo Oigo” and a slinky, insinuating acoustic version of “BB,” heard in different form on the band’s Trio B.C. album.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Adventures In Coverland finds this San Antonio-based female trio ripping into a wide swath of rock, pop, Latin, and country material with gusto. The group acknowledges their affinity for ‘80s British rock by working up a minimalist, finger-snapping take on Joy Division’s “Transmission” and a moody rendering of David Bowie’s “As the World Falls Down.” The Beatles’ “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and Patsy Cline’s “Walkin’ After Midnight” are roughed up with Nina Diaz’s brawny guitar work, while the drama within Selena’s “Si una Vez” is heightened to tormented extremes. Especially revelatory are the treatments given to Richie Valens’ “Come On, Let’s Go,” the Velvet Underground’s “Femme Fatale” and Buffalo Springfield’s “For What It’s Worth.” Diaz struts and snarls her way through these tunes with the defiant charisma of a young Chrissie Hynde, backed by the ferocious playing of bandmates Jenn Alva and Phanie Diaz. The album is nicely rounded out by the tough-yet-tender new original “Yo Oigo” and a slinky, insinuating acoustic version of “BB,” heard in different form on the band’s Trio B.C. album.

TITLE TIME
2:56
3:24
3:46
3:56
2:07
2:48
3:13
3:27
3:56
3:19

About Girl In a Coma

Naming themselves in homage of the Smiths' song "Girlfriend in a Coma," Girl in a Coma started in San Antonio, TX, with bassist Jenn Alva and drummer Phanie Diaz, two best friends who bonded thanks to a shared interest in Nirvana and the Smiths. The duo endured several failed experiments in both band lineups and musical styles before discovering that Nina Diaz, Phanie's younger sister, possessed talent as a singer, guitarist, and songwriter. Though Nina was only 12 when she performed her first song for them, both Alva and Diaz recognized her potential. After recruiting the younger Diaz, Girl in a Coma spent five years writing, performing, and touring before coming to the attention of label reps and tour managers in the summer of 2004. One of the managers sent a homemade demo tape to Morrissey music director Boz Boorer; after hearing it, Boorer invited the trio to London to record its first demo. Soon after returning, Girl in a Coma found themselves featured in a television documentary about emerging Latino bands. As part of the show, the group went to New York City for a show at the Knitting Factory and a surprise meeting with Joan Jett. While on camera, Jett and her producing partner Kenny Laguna praised the trio's set -- and invited the band to join the Blackheart Records label. Girl in a Coma accepted and released their debut album, Both Before I'm Gone, in May 2007. ~ Katherine Fulton

  • ORIGIN
    San Antonio, TX
  • GENRE
    Rock
  • FORMED
    2001

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