iTunes

Abriendo iTunes Store.Si iTunes no se abre, haz clic en el icono de la aplicación iTunes en el Dock de Mac o en el escritorio de Windows.Progress Indicator
Abriendo el iBooks Store.Si iBooks no se abre, haz clic en la app iBooks del Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

No encontramos iTunes en este ordenador. Para escuchar un fragmento y comprar música de One Track Mind de Railroad Jerk, descarga iTunes ahora.

¿Ya tienes iTunes? Haz clic en Tengo iTunes para abrirlo ahora.

I Have iTunes Descarga gratuita
iTunes para Mac + PC

One Track Mind

Abre iTunes para escuchar un fragmento, comprar y descargar música.

Reseña de álbum

Marcellus Hall's rootsy vocals on One Track Mind blended with the band's bluesy instrumentation to create a stellar indie rock album. The band's take on roots rock could be a genre all its own, as no other band was quite as gritty yet catchy during the mid-'90s era. "Bang the Drum" is a Jon Spencer Blues Explosion-spiced rocker. "What Did You Expect" has a folky, back-porch feel before it transforms itself into a gutsy and direct track. On "Forty Minutes," Hall laments about his impending death, narrating his final wishes. "The Ballad of Railroad Jerk" is the tale of the band's turbulent attempt to swim upstream in an industry that often fights against trailblazers like Railroad Jerk. The band's confident sound is filled with a kind swagger, especially on tracks like "Help Yourself" and "You Better Go Now." The sound calms down on "Some Girl Waved," which is followed by the bass-driven album-closer "Zero Blues." Guitarist Alec Stephen, bassist Tony Lee, and drummer Dave Varenka round out the quartet. The album was recorded at New York City's Tin Pan Alley Studios in 1994. Matador Records released One Track Mind in 1995.

Reseñas de clientes

Good band, fantastic album.

Why was this album so overlooked? Were too many of us looking to the left coast? In 1995 it set the standard for cut-up/ramshackle/trashcan throwback blues. RRJ did it funkier, dirtier and more clever than that boy/girl duo (whose name we won't mention) that rose to stardom a decade later with roughly the same bucket of influences. And its still a fantastic listen. "Bang the Drum" and "Rollerkoaster" alone are worth the price of admission with an mindbending juxtaposition of jerk, dirt and pop. I still hang on every word of "The Ballad of RRJ." RRJ was a good band but this record is uncanny. Easily a creative peak for the band - I'd go so far as to say its one of the best albums of the 90s. Try it, it'll make you smile AND dance.

Overlooked Gem

Unfairly forced to stand behind Jon Spencer Blues Explosion in the Matador Records class picture, RR Jerk was music for me in 1995-96. If it were possible to wear out a CD, I'd have gone through three copies of One Track Mind by now. Marcellus Hall is one of the best American songwriters going today and this album was RR Jerk at the peak of their country/blues/kitchen sink/brake drum skills. 180 degrees out of phase with everything about the year it was released. Thank goodness for that.

Must Have Fuzzy Blues Noise Gem

Heavily overlooked band in the shadow of Jon Spencer. Saw them live in 1995/96 opening for Boss Hog and it was fantastic. If you like the blues-driven sound of the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, this will bring you lots of joy and it never gets old.

Biografía

Fecha de formación: 1989

Género: Alternativa

Años de actividad: '00s

Railroad Jerk skewer blues, country, rock, and noise into a messy, bohemian post-punk celebration of roots rock. Formed in 1989 by guitarist/vocalist Marcellus Hall and bassist/vocalist Tony Lee in Trenton, NJ, the duo added drummer Jez Aspinall and guitarist Chris Muller by early 1990; the group recorded their self-titled debut for Matador Records in 1990. After its release, Aspinall left the band and was replaced by Steve Cercio; Muller was kicked out of the band and replaced by Alec Stephen. The...
Biografía completa