14 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Coming after the grandly produced Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea, Uh Huh Her delivered the perfect reaction shot. Harvey recorded everything but the backing vocals and drums herself. The effect is that of a garage band with a beautifully primitive grasp. “The Pocket Knife” is spare and direct. “The Life and Death of Mr. Badmouth” is brutal and churning. “The Letter” expands the sound ever so subtly with layers of guitars and keyboards to offset Harvey’s punkish glee. But it’s the keyboard and whispers of “The Slow Drug” that create the best soundstage. Here, Harvey finds a narcotic buzz that’s as slowly shape-forming as a lava lamp. “No Child of Mine” plays like a simple folk-song sing-along. The arrangements are ever changing for what is primarily a one-woman show. “Cat on the Wall” catches a grunting punk grind. “The Desperate Kingdom of Love” is shockingly tender. “The Darker Days Of Me and Him” is disturbingly solitary and lonely, a brilliant ending to an album that travels through time and space by the most primitive means.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Coming after the grandly produced Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea, Uh Huh Her delivered the perfect reaction shot. Harvey recorded everything but the backing vocals and drums herself. The effect is that of a garage band with a beautifully primitive grasp. “The Pocket Knife” is spare and direct. “The Life and Death of Mr. Badmouth” is brutal and churning. “The Letter” expands the sound ever so subtly with layers of guitars and keyboards to offset Harvey’s punkish glee. But it’s the keyboard and whispers of “The Slow Drug” that create the best soundstage. Here, Harvey finds a narcotic buzz that’s as slowly shape-forming as a lava lamp. “No Child of Mine” plays like a simple folk-song sing-along. The arrangements are ever changing for what is primarily a one-woman show. “Cat on the Wall” catches a grunting punk grind. “The Desperate Kingdom of Love” is shockingly tender. “The Darker Days Of Me and Him” is disturbingly solitary and lonely, a brilliant ending to an album that travels through time and space by the most primitive means.

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