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Album Review

This release marks the fourth time a Supremes collection titled Anthology has hit the racks. Fans can be forgiven for getting confused, even aggravated, as to which one should be selected above others, as all of them contain the basic big hits for which the group is known. Motown keeps tweaking the precise track lineup with each edition, however, as they have for this two-CD, 50-track set. First off, if you're starting from scratch and just want a good greatest-hits collection, this is very good, and you won't have any regrets after purchase. The key thing to keep in mind is that it covers only the Diana Ross years, and doesn't reach into the 1970s for the clutch of hits the group landed without her. It has all of their 1960s chart singles, though, including duets with the Temptations and some low-charting ones that aren't familiar, from 1962's "Your Heart Belongs to Me" to 1969's "No Matter What Sign You Are." Along the way are some odd B-sides, album tracks, and rarities, like their early-'60s singles "I Want a Guy" and "Buttered Popcorn," and their Phil Spector-produced 1966 public service announcement "Things Are Changing." The ten covers at the end grouped under the heading "Supreme Stylists" are padding, as the group takes a shot at material from the Beatles to Disney and Broadway, but they do reflect an aspect of the Supremes that was represented on their albums and in their live performances. As for the three previously unreleased items here, you've gotta be real hardcore to shell out for the whole set if you already have most of the songs, as they comprise an extended version of "Love Is Like an Itching in My Heart," an alternate mix of "You Keep Me Hanging On," and a stereo mix of "He." Also, the version of "Buttered Popcorn" is the first pressing, and was previously unavailable on album.

Customer Reviews

Suprmes!!!!

I love this album. If you have never heard The Supremes you are missing out. They have great hits and wonderful songs that i never even heard of. You have to buy it because it is an iPod essential. It was werth every penny.

i love the supremes!!!

i love this album! but there's one mistake. the song buttered pocorn isn't diana ross and the supremes. its just the supremes. as you can tell, that's not diana ross on lead. its florence ballard. and the group wasn't called diana ross & the supremes while flo ballard was in it. but otherwise, great album

Love the Supremes, HATE their so-called "fans"!

This music speake for itself. The Supremes ruled back in the day, and for any true and REAL Supremes fan, they still do. Forget about the loser internet groups (like VMF) who thrive on bashing The Supremes and their fans while pretending they're Miss Diana Ross. This album is about the music that made The Supremes the #1 all-time leading girl group in the world. Listen to the music, forget about the idiots on VMF and other HATE-GROUPS. THE SUPREMES RULE!

Biography

Born: March 26, 1944 in Detroit, MI

Genre: R&B/Soul

Years Active: '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

As a solo artist, Diana Ross is one of the most successful female singers of the rock era. If you factor in her work as the lead singer of the Supremes in the 1960s, she may be the most successful. With her friends Mary Wilson, Florence Ballard, and Barbara Martin, Ross formed the Primettes vocal quartet in 1959. In 1960, they were signed to local Motown Records, changing their name to the Supremes in 1961. Martin then left, and the group continued as a trio. Over the next eight years, the Supremes...
Full Bio