14 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a solo performer, former Soundgarden and Audioslave singer Chris Cornell never seems completely comfortable choosing a path. His second solo album Carry On, much like his first solo project 1999’s Euphoria Morning, finds Cornell searching for the balance between his hard rock roots and the new, open possibilities and freedom that solo work presents. “No Such Thing” kicks things off with the tough histrionics that have always been Cornell’s forte. However, several cuts along, he sports a soulful strut (“Safe and Sound,” “She’ll Never Be Your Man”) that sounds as if he’s hunkered down in a funky nightclub for the evening. Throw in an odd acoustic coffeehouse-friendly cover of Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean” that’s informed by Cornell’s innate foreboding sense and you get the feeling that he’s looking to throw everyone off his scent. Old school Joe Cocker? Future duets with Joan Osborne? Back to the hard rock grind? The man’s got the range to pull off whatever he chooses and Carry On proves this in its zig zag way.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a solo performer, former Soundgarden and Audioslave singer Chris Cornell never seems completely comfortable choosing a path. His second solo album Carry On, much like his first solo project 1999’s Euphoria Morning, finds Cornell searching for the balance between his hard rock roots and the new, open possibilities and freedom that solo work presents. “No Such Thing” kicks things off with the tough histrionics that have always been Cornell’s forte. However, several cuts along, he sports a soulful strut (“Safe and Sound,” “She’ll Never Be Your Man”) that sounds as if he’s hunkered down in a funky nightclub for the evening. Throw in an odd acoustic coffeehouse-friendly cover of Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean” that’s informed by Cornell’s innate foreboding sense and you get the feeling that he’s looking to throw everyone off his scent. Old school Joe Cocker? Future duets with Joan Osborne? Back to the hard rock grind? The man’s got the range to pull off whatever he chooses and Carry On proves this in its zig zag way.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5

440 Ratings

440 Ratings

Please don't expect Soundgarden or Audioslave

Mars6000

It's obvious Cornell is on his own now. With the exception of No Such Thing (which mildly resembles Audioslave) this album is all his own. But this should come as no surprise since his last solo album (Euphoria Morning) was such a departure from Soundgarden. So I will compare this album to his previous solo project. Between the two, Carry On is the more uptempo album. Which wasn't hard to do since Euphoria Morning was so mellow. But Carry On has it's mellow moments. Arms Around Your Love, and maybe the best song on the album Safe and Sound are examples. Cornell doesn't feel the need to rock out. You have No Such Thing and You Know My Name as the rocking bookends for the album, and everything inbetween is the most melodic music of his career. Including a cover of Billy Jean (which is getting some heat, but I kind of like it). People are going to bash this album and it's pretty easy too. Since nothing he can do will compare with Soundgarden or Audioslave (which in my opinion was the best rock music of the past 20 years) this album will get ripped apart. But if you like good honest music you can just throw in your cd player and kick back and listen too, this album will do just fine. Please don't say 'this is no Soundgarden' or 'what happened to Black Hole Sun'. That ship has sailed my friends, and it's not coming back. Maybe it's time you move on too.

Makes me Wish i hadnt wasted money on Toms Solo record...

DingomanProductions

...

Don't beleive the negative hype

jokerstyle

This album got bad reviews in every major US music magazine....but it's uncalled for.
Those who truly know Chris' music will recognize this as a natural progression taking him as far away from grunge as you can get.

My advice...start with 'Ghosts' and 'Safe & Sound'

I prefer musicians who write to their age and don't pretend to by in the 20s and re-live past glories....that's what Chris is doing here on this album.

About Chris Cornell

Originally finding success as the frontman of Seattle's Soundgarden, rock vocalist Chris Cornell forged a successful career after the band's 1997 demise, both with the supergroup Audioslave and as a diverse solo artist. Born in Seattle on July 20, 1964, his music career didn't take shape until he was a teenager, when he began playing drums in a local cover band. Although he spent most of his teenage years as a loner, rock music helped Cornell overcome his uneasiness around others. After dropping out of high school and working as a cook, Cornell laid the foundation for what would become the influential grunge band Soundgarden by the mid-'80s. Cornell assumed vocal duties for the group, with friend Hiro Yamamoto on bass, Kim Thayil on guitar, and eventually Matt Cameron on drums.

Along with the Melvins, Soundgarden was one of the first rock bands to slow down punk's youthful energy to a Black Sabbath-like crawl. Following the release of several recordings on various independent labels, Soundgarden also became one of the first bands of the Seattle underground to sign with a major label, A&M, which issued Louder Than Love in 1989. After the album's release, however, Yamamoto left and was first replaced by ex-Nirvana member Jason Everman, who was later ousted by Ben Shepherd. With Soundgarden's quintessential lineup in place, the group became one of rock's most popular bands on the strength of such albums as 1991's Badmotorfinger, 1994's Superunknown, and 1996's Down on the Upside. With each album, Cornell's singing grew stronger as he demonstrated a growing mastery of his multi-octave range.

From the start, however, Cornell's talents weren't limited to his work with Soundgarden. He organized a tribute for late Mother Love Bone singer Andrew Wood in the form of 1990's Temple of the Dog project, which featured a stripped-down sound and yielded the moderate hit "Hunger Strike." Cornell's first officially released solo composition, the acoustic "Seasons," was the highlight of the 1992 motion picture soundtrack Singles. His bluesy voice also helmed a superb cover of Jimi Hendrix's "Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)" on the 1993 Stone Free: A Tribute to Jimi Hendrix compilation (under the pseudonym M.A.C.C.). Meanwhile, he found time to pen songs for other acts (including Flotsam & Jetsam and Alice Cooper) while also producing the Screaming Trees' 1991 release, Uncle Anesthesia. After Soundgarden's demise in April 1997, Cornell slowly but surely began to assemble a solo album with his friends from the band Eleven.

Issued in 1999, Euphoria Morning was a departure from his former band's sound, emphasizing Cornell's vocals and lyrics rather than meaty guitar riffs. Shortly after its release, Cornell launched his first solo tour, mixing songs from all eras of his career. After the tour's conclusion in early 2000, a tepid remix of the Euphoria Morning track "Mission" (retitled "Mission 2000") was included on the Mission Impossible 2 soundtrack. It appeared as though Cornell would take a break from music for a while, as his wife gave birth to the couple's first child in June of the same year, but by late 2000, Cornell found himself involved in a project that promised to be a classic hard rock collaboration.

Rage Against the Machine had decided not to break up after longtime vocalist Zack de la Rocha left the band, opting instead to find another singer and carry on under a different name. Cornell accepted an invitation to jam and pen a few songs (which former Rage guitarist Tom Morello described as "really groundbreaking") and, shortly thereafter, officially joined forces with the former Rage members under the moniker Audioslave. Produced by Rick Rubin, the band's self-titled debut arrived in November 2002 and went multi-platinum. The follow-up effort, 2005's Out of Exile, debuted at number one on the Billboard charts and was followed by the platinum-selling Revelations in 2006. Despite such success, Cornell left the band that same year, citing the usual "irreconcilable differences" for his departure.

Cornell returned to his solo career with 2007's Carry On. Although the album was largely biographical, it also featured a cover of Michael Jackson's "Billy Jean" (a rendition made famous one year later by American Idol contender David Cook) and a song from the James Bond movie Casino Royale. Two new singles, "Ground Zero" and "Watch Out," were offered as digital downloads one year later, featuring a newfound emphasis on electronics and studio trickery. The tracks had been recorded with producer Timbaland, with whom Cornell partnered for the creation of his third solo album. Stocked with drum machines and R&B melodies, Scream arrived in March 2009, heralded by Timbaland as "the best work I've done in my career" but received poorly by several critics.

The following year, Soundgarden joined the many popular '90s alternative bands who reunited in the 2000s and 2010s, headlining that year's Lollapalooza festival and releasing the retrospectives Telephantasm and Live on I-5, which documented the group's 1996 tour, as well as recording new songs. The following spring, however, Cornell returned to his solo career with the solo acoustic Songbook tour, from which came two EPs and the Songbook album, all of which were released in 2011. That September, Cornell contributed a song to the Machine Gun Preacher soundtrack. King Animal, Soundgarden's first album since Down on the Upside, appeared in November 2012 and the group supported the record with a tour. Cornell returned to his solo work in 2015, teaming with producer Brendan O'Brien to record Higher Truth, his first collection of original solo songs since 2009's Scream. Cornell returned to Soundgarden in 2016, with the band beginning work on a new album. In the meantime, the group released a deluxe reissue of Ultramega OK in March 2017 and began an American tour that April. On May 17, following the band's concert at Detroit's Fox Theater, Cornell was found dead in his hotel room; he had taken his own life at the age of 52. ~ Greg Prato

  • ORIGIN
    Seattle, WA
  • GENRE
    Rock
  • BORN
    July 20, 1964

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