10 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Similar to Echo Dek—Primal Scream’s 1997 roots reggae reworking of its fifth studio album, Vanishing Point—the Bay Area indie band Extra Classic has delivered a 2013 dub remix of its astonishing 2011 debut album, Your Light Like White Lightning, Your Light Like a Laser Beam. “Congo Rebel Dub” keeps the infectious melody intact. But where Dri Verhoeven’s vocals took center stage in the original recording, here she lets Alex deLanda’s roomy, boomy bass leads take prominence as she sings through thick clouds of vintage analog tape delay. “Cat’s Eye” similarly elongates the album’s “Metal Tiger” with pitter-patter rhythms percolating under bouncing guitar chords. This version of “You Can’t Bring Me Down” stays closer to the original, save for more organ solos and a heartier offering of Studio One–sounding tape echo. “Orbit (Returning the Tape)” boasts the most gratuitous amount of analog delay manipulation here. But it's “Give Them the Same Dub” where it all comes together around deLanda’s bass mantras. The wah-wah guitar and spring reverb slapping in “Desert Dust” provide an authentic '70s sound.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Similar to Echo Dek—Primal Scream’s 1997 roots reggae reworking of its fifth studio album, Vanishing Point—the Bay Area indie band Extra Classic has delivered a 2013 dub remix of its astonishing 2011 debut album, Your Light Like White Lightning, Your Light Like a Laser Beam. “Congo Rebel Dub” keeps the infectious melody intact. But where Dri Verhoeven’s vocals took center stage in the original recording, here she lets Alex deLanda’s roomy, boomy bass leads take prominence as she sings through thick clouds of vintage analog tape delay. “Cat’s Eye” similarly elongates the album’s “Metal Tiger” with pitter-patter rhythms percolating under bouncing guitar chords. This version of “You Can’t Bring Me Down” stays closer to the original, save for more organ solos and a heartier offering of Studio One–sounding tape echo. “Orbit (Returning the Tape)” boasts the most gratuitous amount of analog delay manipulation here. But it's “Give Them the Same Dub” where it all comes together around deLanda’s bass mantras. The wah-wah guitar and spring reverb slapping in “Desert Dust” provide an authentic '70s sound.

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