6 Songs, 13 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Never Trust a Hippy captures the political frustration and self-loathing of Wolves in Wolves’ Clothing in about a third of the time. “Seeing Double at the Triple Rock” is one of NOFX’s best rock songs; the ode to drinking at a Minneapolis club features one of El Hefe’s tightest guitar riffs. Hefe’s blinding speed turns up again in another party-going song, “Everything in Moderation (Especially Moderation),” which has a guitar part so wonderfully dizzying that it captures the whirlwind nights described in the lyrics. “The Marxist Brothers” and “I’m Going to Hell for This One” are two of Fat Mike’s finest satires: one skewers political activists, the other Christian believers. “Golden Boys” is a compelling anti-war song, but the key track is “You’re Wrong.” It's a pointed message paired with a poignant tune. The song’s sentiment—“If you disagree with us, you’re just wrong”—would be utterly obnoxious if the song weren't so sweet. Due to its gentle delivery, the message takes on a wearied tone, as if NOFX tired of being clever and simply needed to state its case in the most direct terms possible.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Never Trust a Hippy captures the political frustration and self-loathing of Wolves in Wolves’ Clothing in about a third of the time. “Seeing Double at the Triple Rock” is one of NOFX’s best rock songs; the ode to drinking at a Minneapolis club features one of El Hefe’s tightest guitar riffs. Hefe’s blinding speed turns up again in another party-going song, “Everything in Moderation (Especially Moderation),” which has a guitar part so wonderfully dizzying that it captures the whirlwind nights described in the lyrics. “The Marxist Brothers” and “I’m Going to Hell for This One” are two of Fat Mike’s finest satires: one skewers political activists, the other Christian believers. “Golden Boys” is a compelling anti-war song, but the key track is “You’re Wrong.” It's a pointed message paired with a poignant tune. The song’s sentiment—“If you disagree with us, you’re just wrong”—would be utterly obnoxious if the song weren't so sweet. Due to its gentle delivery, the message takes on a wearied tone, as if NOFX tired of being clever and simply needed to state its case in the most direct terms possible.

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