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Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

This book can be downloaded and read in iBooks on your Mac or iOS device.


New York Times Bestseller

The book that inspired the hit film!

Sundance U.S. Dramatic Audience Award
Sundance Grand Jury Prize
This is the funniest book you’ll ever read about death.
It is a universally acknowledged truth that high school sucks. But on the first day of his senior year, Greg Gaines thinks he’s figured it out. The answer to the basic existential question: How is it possible to exist in a place that sucks so bad? His strategy: remain at the periphery at all times. Keep an insanely low profile. Make mediocre films with the one person who is even sort of his friend, Earl.
        This plan works for exactly eight hours. Then Greg’s mom forces him to become friends with a girl who has cancer. This brings about the destruction of Greg’s entire life.

Praise for Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
“One need only look at the chapter titles (“Let’s Just Get This Embarrassing Chapter Out of the Way”) to know that this is one funny book.”
Booklist, starred review

“A frequently hysterical confessional...Debut novelist Andrews succeeds brilliantly in painting a portrait of a kid whose responses to emotional duress are entirely believable and sympathetic, however fiercely he professes his essential crappiness as a human being. Though this novel begs inevitable thematic comparisons to John Green's The Fault in Our Stars (2011), it stands on its own in inventiveness, humor and heart.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“It is sure to be popular with many boys, including reluctant readers, and will not require much selling on the part of the librarian.”

"Mr. Andrews' often hilarious teen dialogue is utterly convincing, and his characters are compelling. Greg's random sense of humor, terrible self-esteem and general lack of self-awareness all ring true. Like many YA authors, Mr. Andrews blends humor and pathos with true skill, but he steers clear of tricky resolutions and overt life lessons, favoring incremental understanding and growth."
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Capitol Choices 2013 - Noteworthy Titles for Children and Teens
Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC) Choices 2013 list - Young Adult Fiction
YALSA 2013 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers
YALSA 2013 Best Fiction for Young Adults
YALSA 2014 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults

From Publishers Weekly

Feb 06, 2012 – In his debut novel, Andrews tackles some heavy subjects with irreverence and insouciance. Senior Greg Gaines has drifted through high school trying to be friendly with everyone but friends with no one, moving between cliques without committing. His only hobby is making awful movies with his foul-mouthed pal Earl. Greg s carefully maintained routine is upset when his mother encourages him to spend time with Rachel, a classmate suffering from leukemia. Greg begrudgingly rekindles his friendship with Rachel, before being conned into making a movie about her. Narrated by Greg, who brings self-deprecation to new heights (or maybe depths), this tale tries a little too hard to be both funny and tragic, mixing crude humor and painful self-awareness. Readers may be either entertained or exhausted by the grab bag of narrative devices Andrews employs (screenplay-style passages, bulleted lists, movie reviews, fake newspaper headlines, outlines). In trying to defy the usual tearjerker tropes, Andrews ends up with an oddly unaffecting story. Ages 14 up.

Customer Reviews


It is really funny! I don't even like to read nor am I finished with the book. So far it is constantly telling you to put the book down. The pages don't have many words either. It curses allot, so you can't be effended by it. It is worth reading.

Good Read for a Plane Ride

First off if you only read John Green books and are really into his style, you will hate this book. It's like the polar opposite of The Fault in Our Stars.
Yeah it's a book about a girl with cancer but you will not get any kind of overwhelming sense of sadness and depression. In all honesty this book has practically nothing to do with cancer.
This book is straight up. There's not any sugar coating in this book. It's as rough and raw as the characters. But it's absolutely hilarious. If you're anything like me, you'll find yourself chuckling and rolling your eyes because of how brilliantly honest Greg is. Even though Greg tells you to give up on the book, don't. Don't you dare do it. You'll miss out on something that'll leave you with a feeling you can't even describe. Read it already. Stop contemplating it. Just do it man.

Funny, entertaining fast read

Right when I started reading this book, I just could not put it down and read about 150 pages. It a great, funny book but it had an ending that I did not really expect. I mainly read this book because I want to see the movie and I enjoy reading before seeing. But overall I would recommend it and I'm glad I read it.

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
View in iTunes
  • $8.99
  • Available on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac.
  • Category: Fiction
  • Published: Mar 15, 2012
  • Publisher: ABRAMS
  • Seller: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.
  • Print Length: 288 Pages
  • Language: English
  • Requirements: To view this book, you must have an iOS device with iBooks 1.3.1 or later and iOS 4.3.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later.

Customer Ratings