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Men We Reaped

A Memoir

This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device.

Description

Named one of the Best Books of the Century by New York Magazine

Two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward (Salvage the Bones, Sing, Unburied, Sing) contends with the deaths of five young men dear to her, and the risk of being a black man in the rural South.


"We saw the lightning and that was the guns; and then we heard the thunder and that was the big guns; and then we heard the rain falling and that was the blood falling; and when we came to get in the crops, it was dead men that we reaped.†? -Harriet Tubman

In five years, Jesmyn Ward lost five young men in her life-to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that can follow people who live in poverty, particularly black men. Dealing with these losses, one after another, made Jesmyn ask the question: Why? And as she began to write about the experience of living through all the dying, she realized the truth-and it took her breath away. Her brother and her friends all died because of who they were and where they were from, because they lived with a history of racism and economic struggle that fostered drug addiction and the dissolution of family and relationships. Jesmyn says the answer was so obvious she felt stupid for not seeing it. But it nagged at her until she knew she had to write about her community, to write their stories and her own.

Jesmyn grew up in poverty in rural Mississippi. She writes powerfully about the pressures this brings, on the men who can do no right and the women who stand in for family in a society where the men are often absent. She bravely tells her story, revisiting the agonizing losses of her only brother and her friends. As the sole member of her family to leave home and pursue higher education, she writes about this parallel American universe with the objectivity distance provides and the intimacy of utter familiarity. A brutal world rendered beautifully, Jesmyn Ward's memoir will sit comfortably alongside Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying, Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life, and Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

From Publishers Weekly

Jun 24, 2013 – In this riveting memoir of the ghosts that haunt her hometown in Mississippi, two-time novelist and National Book Award winner Ward (Salvage the Bones) writes intimately about the pall of blighted opportunity, lack of education, and circular poverty that hangs over the young, vulnerable African-American inhabitants of DeLisle, Miss., who are reminiscent of the characters in Ward s fictionalized Bois Sauvage. The five young black men featured here are the author s dear friends and her younger brother, whose deaths between 2000 and 2004 were seemingly unrelated, but all linked to drug and alcohol abuse, depression, and a general lack of trust in the ability of society and, ultimately, family and friends to nurture them. The first to die (though his story is told last in the book) was her brother, Joshua, a handsome man who didn t do as well in school as Ward and was stuck back home, doing odd jobs while his sister attended Stanford and later moved to N.Y.C. Joshua died senselessly after being struck by a drunk driver on a dark coastal road one night. The wolf that tracked all of these young men and the author, too, when she experienced the isolation of being black at predominantly white schools was the sense of how little their lives mattered. Ward beautifully incorporates the pain and guilt woven her and her brother s lives by the absence and failure of their father, forcing their mother to work as a housekeeper to keep the family afloat. Ward has a soft touch, making these stories heartbreakingly real through vivid portrayal and dialogue.

Customer Reviews

Men we reaped

Stunning story that gives great insight into how the poor live. Jesmyn opens up and let's the reader feel her pain and loss.

Profound, painful, important

Her story of losses, both personal & community wide is timely. We don’t talk about the high mortality rate of the poor, never mind poor, young & black. In Trump’s America, the message of this book is vital.

Men We Reaped
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  • $13.99
  • Available on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac.
  • Category: Biographies & Memoirs
  • Published: Sep 17, 2013
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Seller: INscribe Digital
  • Print Length: 272 Pages
  • Language: English
  • Requirements: This book can only be viewed on an iOS device with Apple Books on iOS 12 or later, iBooks 1.3.1 or later and iOS 4.3.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later.

Customer Ratings