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The Fall of Hyperion

Book 2, Hyperion Cantos

This book is available for download with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device, and with iTunes on your computer. Books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device.

Description

In the stunning continuation of the epic adventure begun in Hyperion, Simmons returns us to a far future resplendent with drama and invention.  On
the world of Hyperion, the mysterious Time Tombs are opening.  And the secrets they contain mean that nothing--nothing anywhere in the universe--will ever be the same.

From the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Jan 30, 1990 – This densely plotted book concludes the futuristic tale begun in Hyperion . Earth has long since been destroyed, and humans now occupy more than 150 worlds linked by the Web, an instantaneous travel system created and operated by artificial intelligences (AIs--self-aware, highly advanced computers). These worlds are about to war with the Ousters, a branch of humanity that has disdained dependency on the AIs. At risk are the planet Hyperion, its mysterious Tombs that travel backward in time, and the Shrike, its god/avatar of pain or retribution. The narrative focuses on the government of the Web and its leader, Meina Gladstone, as observed by Joseph Severn, a cybernetic re-creation of the poet John Keats, and seven Shrike pilgrims, who may affect the war's outcome. Simmons pits good against evil, with the religions of man and those of the machines battling for supremacy. Despite his grand scale, however, he fashions intensely human individuals whom the reader will take to heart. ( Mar. )

Customer Reviews

Compelling.

Although the first in the series, Hyperion, had better structure and was told better, I liked The Fall of Hyperion more. Its like the reverse of A New Hope and The Empire Stikes Back, in that in the Hyperion Cantos, the horror comes before the hope. I loved the continuing literary alliterations and the exploration of the human spirit through voice. I particularly liked the koans of Ummon, which reminded me of the highly influential Modernist wave of poetry- such as Ezra Pound, with maybe even a snippet of E.E. Cummings. The voice of Ummon also reminded me of the voices of the dolphins from the first Hyperion Cantos. Here I go rambling. Overall, I loved this book and highly recommend it.

Good book, bad transfer

After finishing Hyperion, it was not an option to leave the rest of this compelling story unread. The sequel helps sate the thirst for all the questions raised by the first book and carries on delivering a living, breathing universe made up of alien worlds and interesting characters. The problem here is the transition from paper to e-book. There are many distractingly obvious typos made throughout the book that a simple proof read or spell check would have caught. Otherwise, the Hyperion Cantos is a fine investment.

Good book

This was a good read. That is all

Other Books in This Series

The Fall of Hyperion
View in iTunes
  • $7.99
  • Available on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac.
  • Category: Adventure
  • Published: Feb 01, 1990
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Seller: Penguin Random House LLC
  • Print Length: 528 Pages
  • Language: English
  • Series: Book 2, Hyperion Cantos
  • Requirements: To view this book, you must have an iOS device with iBooks 1.3.1 or later and iOS 4.3.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later.

Customer Ratings