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The Uninhabitable Earth

Life After Warming

This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device.

Description

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

"The Uninhabitable Earth hits you like a comet, with an overflow of insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon."—Andrew Solomon, author of The Noonday Demon


It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible. In California, wildfires now rage year-round, destroying thousands of homes. Across the US, “500-year” storms pummel communities month after month, and floods displace tens of millions annually.

This is only a preview of the changes to come. And they are coming fast. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century.

In his travelogue of our near future, David Wallace-Wells brings into stark relief the climate troubles that await—food shortages, refugee emergencies, and other crises that will reshape the globe. But the world will be remade by warming in more profound ways as well, transforming our politics, our culture, our relationship to technology, and our sense of history. It will be all-encompassing, shaping and distorting nearly every aspect of human life as it is lived today.

Like An Inconvenient Truth and Silent Spring before it, The Uninhabitable Earth is both a meditation on the devastation we have brought upon ourselves and an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation.

Customer Reviews

Torturous

It's very seldom that I put a book down before finishing it, but I couldn't take anymore after getting about halfway through "The Climate Kaleidoscope" section. Here's my advice for those wanting to learn more about climate change: get your hands on the author's notes and read whatever you want from those books and articles. "The Uninhabitable Earth" is just a summary of the science the author has gleaned, accompanied by his ranting, raving, contradictions, and endless condescensions. The "Cascades" section is sheer torture -- artificial, absolutely horribly written prose. If you're still determined to read this, I'll go ahead and give you a preview of what you will learn: the author hates Santa Barbara for some reason ("with its Mission-style impasto of infinite-seeming wealth"); he also hates the wealthy and ambitious, especially those who live in the western world ("gathering in those new megalopolises like moths to a flame"); and he must find the word "quotidian" stimulating in some way considering how many times he uses it. Honestly, that's what you're in for.

The Uninhabitable Earth
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  • $13.99
  • Available on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac.
  • Category: Science & Nature
  • Published: Feb 19, 2019
  • Publisher: Crown/Archetype
  • Seller: Penguin Random House LLC
  • Print Length: 320 Pages
  • Language: English
  • Requirements: This book can only be viewed on an iOS device with Apple Books on iOS 12 or later, iBooks 1.5 or later and iOS 4.3.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later.

Customer Ratings