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The Universe Within

The Deep History of the Human Body

This book is available for download with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device, and with iTunes on your computer. Books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device.

Description

From one of our finest and most popular science writers, the best-selling author of Your Inner Fish, comes the answer to a scientific mystery story as big as the world itself: How have astronomical events that took place millions of years ago created the unique qualities of the human species?

In his last book, Neil Shubin delved into the amazing connections between human anatomy—our hands, our jaws—and the structures in the fish that first took over land 375 million years ago. Now, with his trademark clarity and exuberance, he takes an even more expansive approach to the question of why we are the way we are. Starting once again with fossils, Shubin turns his gaze skyward.  He shows how the entirety of the universe's 14-billion-year history can be seen in our bodies. From our very molecular composition (a result of stellar events at the origin of our solar system), he makes clear, through the working of our eyes, how the evolution of the cosmos has had profound effects on the development of human life on earth.

From the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

May 27, 2013 – The celebrated management consulting company exerts an influence that varies from benign to malign, according to this revealing, if conflicted, history. Financial journalist McDonald (Last Man Standing) traces McKinsey’s rise to the pinnacle of corporate advice peddling and its unique pretensions and privileges: its elitism, decades-long engagements and lucrative open-ended contracts; its symbiosis with the Harvard Business School, whose newly minted grads dole out wisdom to experienced executives under its auspices; its aura of intellectualism, which sometimes amounts to vague buzz phrases and invocations of “change”; its reliance on alumni who helm other companies and steer business its way. McDonald, a contributing editor at Fortune, can’t quite decide whether this is all good or bad, or whether he’s indifferent. He credits McKinsey with rationalizing business practices and forestalling corporate mistakes, but charges it with standing behind blunders and bankruptcies from Enron to GM; he wonders if the firm is less about helping companies make better products more efficiently than giving doctrinal cover to CEOs’ impulses to slash payrolls. McDonald combines a lucid chronicle of McKinsey’s growth and boardroom melodramas with a serviceable, if sometimes cursory analysis of evolving—or at least retreaded—management theories. But the larger import remains, like that of the corporate world it symbolizes, a contradictory muddle.

Customer Reviews

A synthesis of everything

Well, I'm biased. The opening chapter struck a chord; ten years earlier, in 1976, I'd accompanied Farish Jenkins, Chuck Schaff, and Bill Amaral on a collecting expedition in Montana. So I was hooked here from the get-go. Still, the title and topic seemed so far reaching that I purchased the book largely out of skepticism that anyone could address such a theme in a concise and coherent way. But as in his previous book, Your Inner Fish, Shubin maintains this interest with an enviable ability to connect disparate topics and events into a meaningful whole, just as he's done in connecting paleontology with cell and developmental biology in his professional life. He's able to balance technical detail with clear and entertaining prose. He strikes a good balance between personal anecdote and scientific exposition--and maintains that balance through the whole scope of the book. There is a tendency to oversimplify at times, and a few obvious proofreading mistakes--e.g., whales are derived from even-toed ungulates, not odd-toed--but these are minor issues; I very thoroughly enjoyed this and hope there's more to come.

The Universe Within

Excellent book, clear and well written.

The Universe Within
View in iTunes
  • $11.99
  • Available on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac.
  • Category: Life Sciences
  • Published: Jan 08, 2013
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Seller: Penguin Random House LLC
  • Print Length: 240 Pages
  • Language: English
  • Requirements: To view this book, you must have an iOS device with iBooks 1.3.1 or later and iOS 4.3.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later.

Customer Ratings

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