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White Harvest

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Description

In the Artic, man is the deadliest animal

Biologist Kathy McNeely is no stranger to the capricious nature of the wilderness. Fresh off a dangerous research mission in Antarctica, she’s been asked to join a new expedition in Alaska. The Association of Scientists to Save the Environment organized the trip for McNeely and other researchers to identify the risks of the Alaskan pipeline. It’s also a chance for McNeely to investigate the rampant poaching business in the area. What she discovers is shocking.

Someone is butchering entire herds of walruses, using a local Eskimo tribe to do their dirty work by plying them with drugs and alcohol. The man behind the slaughter, Travis Mayberry, is just getting started. His bosses want ivory, lots of it, but there’s one prize that’s worth more than the rest—the tusks of a legendary walrus called Muugli. For those, Travis will do anything… even murder.

With the help of an undercover government agent and an Eskimo patriarch, McNeely pursues the poachers. But as they draw closer to exposing a massive international trafficking ring, McNeely and her team become the target of a ruthless kingpin. To save the walruses, first they’ll need to save themselves.

From Publishers Weekly

May 02, 1994 – Charbonneau's new eco-chiller, a sequel to The Ice , pits marine biologist Kathy McNeely against an ivory-poaching ring that is bribing Native Alaskans with drugs to create a fake legal cover against Fish and Wildlife Service investigations into their slaughter of walruses. McNeely's last expose drew media attention that is now needed by ASSET, an activist group that opposes a new Alaska pipeline. McNeely agrees to participate with hunky ASSET scientist Jason Cobb on an environmental-impact study near the Chukchi Sea, a source of walrus ivory for the lucrative Asian carving markets supplied by New York mobster Harry Madrid's savage smugglers in Nome through Hong Kong's insatiable Madam Chang. Chang has seen a news photo of the legendary walrus Muugli and demanded his huge tusks. Madrid's poachers hire undercover agent John Rorie to pilot a walrus shoot, but a winter storm hits before they collect their booty, and Muugli escapes. Eskimo patriarch John Mulak finds the ivory and, enraged at the slaughter, hides it in a bear cave. Unable to fill Madrid's order by Chang's deadline, the poachers bribe Mulak's son to help track him down in Rorie's plane. A race ensues involving most of the principals, which Charbonneau briskly orchestrates. The Alaskan wilderness sings under Charbonneau's touch, but elsewhere the prose lacks grace, and the padded cast also detracts from the plot line. Oddly, the series character, Kathy McNeely, is superfluous to the story, providing a contrived woman-in-peril motif. Still, the book speaks volumes about endangered species, and the walrus lore is intriguing.
White Harvest
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  • $7.99
  • Available on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac.
  • Category: Mysteries & Thrillers
  • Published: Nov 04, 2013
  • Publisher: JABberwocky Literary Agency, Inc.
  • Seller: INscribe Digital
  • Print Length: 285 Pages
  • Language: English
  • Requirements: To view this book, you must have an iOS device with iBooks 1.3.1 or later and iOS 4.3.3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks 1.0 or later and OS X 10.9 or later.

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