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Hacking Consciousness: Consciousness, Cognition, and the Brain

by Stanford

This course material is only available in the iTunes U app on iPhone or iPad.

Course Description

Listen to renowned physicists, nutritionists, neuroscientists, etc. as they investigate the nature of consciousness as a field of all possibilities. We'll explore consciousness as the source not only of the human mind and its ability to experience, know, innovate... but also as the source of all structures and functions in creation, from fine particles to DNA to galaxies, in parallel with the scientific notion of a unified field, or superstring at the basis of the infinite diversity of time and space.

For more online learning opportunities, please visit Stanford Online.

Customer Reviews

Poorly organized

First three lectures were adverts for Transcendental Meditation and western Guruism. Some neuroscience appears eventually. Some of the later speakers are more informative

Einstein would kick the first three lectures from the list ...

I m up to the first three lectures .... so far they all sound like witchcraft in disguise .. wonder what the founding fathers of modern physics would say .. but anyway I m going to continue .. even for entertaining purposes ...

Hmm, interesting, but ???

Skip the first two lectures. Little or no science there.
Watch Dr. Peeke. She's interesting and you might pick up a point or two.

The final lecture presents the science and it's interesting.

Hacking Consciousness: Consciousness, Cognition, and the Brain
View in iTunes

Customer Ratings