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France Since 1871 - Audio

by John Merriman

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Description

(HIST 276) This course covers the emergence of modern France. Topics include the social, economic, and political transformation of France; the impact of France's revolutionary heritage, of industrialization, and of the dislocation wrought by two world wars; and the political response of the Left and the Right to changing French society. This class was recorded in Fall 2007.

Customer Reviews

Excellent

This is a very interesting lecture series. The other reviews complain that it's "anecdotal". If you're looking for lists of dates and facts look elsewhere. Tis isn't Wikipedia. These are interesting discussions of ideas and topics and trust me, if you pay attention you'll learn plenty and it won't taste like medicine! Try it you'll like it!

Should have been better

Anecdotal and idiosyncratic. Difficult to listen to. The video did not show the slides which detracted from the series. Should have been much better as the professor is passionate & knowledgeable but came across as story telling.

I loved it!

I loved the audio version of this course. I listened to it in my car, and I picked up a lot of ideas and insight into the history of France that was complementary to some other things I have read or plan to read. Merriman adds a lot of things about his own life in France and some American politics, but his coverage of Émile Henry and Robespierre made the course fun and gave me new interest in the subject.