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Introduction to New Testament History and Literature - Video

By Dale B. Martin

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Description

(RLST 152) This course provides a historical study of the origins of Christianity by analyzing the literature of the earliest Christian movements in historical context, concentrating on the New Testament. Although theological themes will occupy much of our attention, the course does not attempt a theological appropriation of the New Testament as scripture. Rather, the importance of the New Testament and other early Christian documents as ancient literature and as sources for historical study will be emphasized. A central organizing theme of the course will focus on the differences within early Christianity (-ies). This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

Customer Reviews

Good course

This was a good course which provided many new insights to me. However, the professor was frequently a snarky with his students about their lack of class participation.

Irresponsible With Scripture

I will admit that I’ve only listed to episode 11, regarding the Johannine Literature. Dr. Martin is very irresponsible with the context and culture of the text, not considering the underlying ethos of the early church. It’s surreal this is a course taught at Yale.

a great overview

Martin covers a great deal of material in a relatively brief time without making you feel like you're missing something. I appreciated his approach that one should be skeptical even of the professor. He doesn't belittle more conservative views while he speaks of his own, which is sometimes hard to come by. I recommend this course to Christians across the spectrum, from liberal to conservative, for its scholarship and approachability and especially for its open challenge to examine your beliefs and opinions.