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Looking to the Future: Legal and Policy Options for Racially Integrated Education in the South and the Nation

by UNC School of Law

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Description

On April 2, 2009 the UNC Center for Civil Rights held a conference entitled "Looking to the Future: Legal and Policy Options for Racially Integrated Education in the South and the Nation." When federal courts began vigorously enforcing the Brown v. Board of Education decision in the late 1960s, Southern public schools became the most integrated in the country and held that distinction for more than thirty years. Recently, schools in the South, and throughout the United States, have experienced rapid resegregation, disproportionately excluding the growing population of African American and Latino students from equal educational opportunities and access to social capital. This conference focused on the future of public education in the wake of the United States Supreme Court's 2007 decision in Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1 (PICS). The PICS decision is widely known for placing limits on what school districts can do to voluntarily pursue racially integrated schools. But the PICS decision also is important for what it left in place. In PICS, a majority of justices affirmed that school districts have a compelling interest in operating racially integrated public schools. Even though PICS limits how school districts may pursue voluntary integration, the decision, nonetheless, protects their fundamental right to craft creative integration plans for their local schools. The PDF Brochures List the panelists and speakers. For more info please visit the Center's website: http://www.law.unc.edu/centers/civilrights/