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UC Irvine Critical Care Ultrasound

by J. Christian Fox, MD, RDMS, Mark Rosen, MD, RDMS, Michael Lekawa, MD, William Wilson, MD, Matthew Dolich, MD, Davinder Ramsingh, MD, Nate Lane, MD, RDMS

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Description

The tools one needs to successfully pilot a portable ultrasound device in the setting in all things critical care. This includes a heavy dose of ECHO, Pulmonary, and Procedural Guidance.

Customer Reviews

Good videos wrong info

The videos provided are Interesting, however the probe orientations described are incorrect. The author describes how to obtain different views, for example- to obtain the parasternal long axis, point the indicator towards the left elbow. This is incorrect, the indicator should point towards the right elbow, or more realistic towards the right bicep or shoulder in a 45 degree angle. He also states, turn the probe 90 degrees or clockwise toward the right elbow for the parasternal short axis...once again wrong, should be towards the left. This leads to the apical 4. He states indicator should point towards the right hip, however it is again wrong and should be towards the left, basically perpendicular to the bed. Even the 1st view from the sub costal shows the probe angled towards the right shoulder. Ask yourself, where is the heart normally located? Answer. Usually along the left sternal border.

All of the instructions provided by the doctor would only apply to a patient who has dextrocardia or someone who has switched the image on the machine from left to right.

Just an FYI