Lost In La Mancha may be the first "un-making of" documentary. In a genre that exists to hype films before their release, Lost in La Mancha presents an unexpected twist: it is the story of a film that does not exist. Following Terry Gilliam's attempt to bring Don Quixote to the big screen, Lost in La Mancha offers a unique, in-depth look at the harsher realities of filmmaking. With drama that ranges from personal conflicts to epic storms, this is a record of a film disintegrating. In the best tradition of documentary filmmaking, Lost in La Mancha captures all the drama of this story through "fly-on-the-wall" verite footage and on-the-spot interviews. Gilliam's plans for the non-existent film come alive in animations of his storyboards, narrated and voiced by co-writer Tony Grisoni and Gilliam himself. And with the camera tests of the leading actors and the rushes from the only six days of photography, Lost in La Mancha offers a tantalizing glimpse of the cinematic spectacle that might have been. Lost in La Mancha is less a process piece about filmmakers at work and more a powerful drama about the inherent fragility of the creative process -- a compelling study of how, even with an abundance of the best will and passion, the artistic endeavor can remain an impossible dream.

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Trailers

Trailer

Ratings and Reviews

4.0 out of 5
21 Ratings
21 Ratings

94% TOMATOMETER

  • Average 7.5/10
  • Fresh 94
  • Rotten 6

Critics Consensus: A remarkable behind-the-scenes look at a movie that wasn't, Lost in La Mancha is an incisive, entertaining document of the difficulties inherent in the moviemaking process.

Information

Studio
Quixote Films Limited
Genre
Documentary
Released
Copyright
© 2002 IFC Entertainment LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Languages

Primary
English (Stereo)

Accessibility

CC
Closed captions refer to subtitles in the available language with addition of relevant nondialogue information.

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