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Spring Breakers

  R HD Closed Captioning

Harmony Korine

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Plot Summary

From visionary director Harmony Korine comes a bold new vision of the seasonal American ritual known as spring break — the bacchanalia of bikinis, beach parties and beer bongs that attracts hordes of college students each year. Brit (Ashley Benson), Faith (Selena Gomez), Candy (Vanessa Hudgens) and Cotty (Rachel Korine) are best friends anxious to cut loose on their own spring break adventure, but they lack sufficient funds. After holding up a restaurant for quick cash, the girls head to the shore in a stolen car for what they discover is the party of a lifetime. They’re thrown in jail — but quickly bailed out by Alien (James Franco), a local rapper, drug pusher and arms dealer who lures them into a criminal underbelly that’s as lurid as it is liberating for a close-knit gang of girlfriends who are still figuring out their path. With a hallucinatory musical score by Cliff Martinez (DRIVE) and Skrillex, SPRING BREAKERS is an electrifying pop poem to girls gone wild. Harmony Korine unleashes a ferocious, feverish and furiously alive youth quake examining the sensory overload of a new generation of restless youth.

Rotten Tomatoes Movie Reviews

TOMATOMETER

66%
  • Reviews Counted: 167
  • Fresh: 110
  • Rotten: 57
  • Average Rating: 6.3/10

Top Critics' Reviews

Fresh: An authentically cracked expression of the crazy, conflicting signals bombarding today's teenagers. – Tom Charity, CNN.com, Mar 22, 2013

Fresh: The film stands, overall, as one of the director's richer provocations ... – Anthony Lane, New Yorker, Mar 25, 2013

Rotten: Once a year, St. Petersburg is awash with thoughtless, unpleasant people making poor decisions. This spring, Korine is one of them. – Michael O'Sullivan, Washington Post, Mar 22, 2013

Fresh: Korine's story is a searing indictment of today's hedonistic, nihilistic youth, and his script is loaded with sharp, telling dialogue that exposes the rotten moral cores of its characters. – Bruce Demara, Toronto Star, Mar 28, 2013

Read More About This Movie On Rotten Tomatoes

Customer Reviews

THE "DARK SIDE" OF SPRING BREAK

The one thing you should probably know about Harmony Korine is that his movies are extremely divisive and polarizing. You'll either end up loving or downright hating his work by the time the end credits appear, and that's because the taboo subjects he usually tends to portray are dark, cynical, and unflinchingly surreal. For his latest flick, "Spring Breakers," the controversial filmmaker has moved from the art house right into the mainstream, picking up a cast of well-known, big-name stars and penning a script that's as utterly unpredictable as it is strangely insightful. The result is a darkly comical thriller pulsating with raw energy, rich characters, and hallucinatory images. But perhaps what's most surprising of all is that it's not actually an art film purely about spring break. Rather, it acts more like a biting social commentary of today's youth and where we're still headed as a culture.

Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens practically crush their squeaky-clean Disney images as Faith and Candy, who decide to spend their time off from college by heading down to St. Petersburg, Florida with their pals Brit and Cotty (Ashley Benson and Rachel Korine) for a wild week of bikinis, beach parties, and beer bongs. But they've spent all their cash on drugs, so they quickly rob a restaurant and head to the shore. After indulging in a series of raucous events, they soon wind up in jail, only to get bailed out by a sleazy gangster-rapper who goes by the name Alien (James Franco). He decides to take the four of them under his wing, eventually getting them closely involved in his war with a vicious cross-town rival (Gucci Mane).
It all furiously escalates into one disturbing and unforgettable fever dream of a finale.

The movie is shot in lurid, bright-neon colors, with the girls wearing little more than fluorescent bikinis, oftentimes accompanied by pink balaclavas. And the score by Skrillex and Cliff Martinez is hugely visceral and atmospheric, adding some unexpected texture to the way Korine explores drugs, violence, and physicality. It's also rather deliberate that, apart from the religiously minded Faith (Gomez), these young women we follow throughout the film sort of blur together anonymously as they eagerly become more intent on following the same criminal lifestyle as Alien. Their performances grow less and less distinct to the point where they're hardly discernible from one another anymore (although Selena's role is much more "innocent" than her co-stars). So it's no wonder that Alien stands out so starkly, or that Franco gets his groove absolutely right: he's a wannabe thug who loves all the money, girls, guns, and drugs he's suddenly acquired (he even proudly celebrates the fact that he owns so much stuff in a hilarious speech), but truly doesn't know what to do with any of them. His most telling moment in the entire film is when he plays the Britney Spears ballad "Everytime" on his poolside grand piano over a slow-motion montage of him and his newfound gang of gun-toting, bikini-clad babes causing manic amounts of brutal violence wherever they please. Franco is so amazingly believable and hysterical in his performance as Alien that he practically just walks off with this flick in his hands, leaving his mantra "Spring Break Forever!" echoing in our ears long after the outrageously stylized ending, which almost plays out like an art version of the climax in Al Pacino's "Scarface." It's a suitably warped conclusion to an already drugged-out movie.

"Spring Breakers" isn't so much a film as it is a maddening hallucinogenic experience that instantly kicks into sensory overdrive and refuses to slow down for anybody or anything. The exploitative art direction is so wildly indulgent, the dialogue is so utterly ridiculous, and the action scenes are so intensely over-the-top that it never even feels like you're watching reality take place, but rather someone's drug-fueled imagination take over. There are a few issues I have with this movie, such as its infrequent dependence on showing the same scenes over and over again, but luckily, they don't take away much from the film as a whole. Still, at the end of the day, you're either gonna end up loving or hating this flick. If you plan on seeing it for Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens alone, I can pretty much guarantee you're not gonna like it. "Spring Breakers" may boast an all-star cast, but it's a polarizing, highly-stylized art house film at heart, and it does contain content that may shock or repulse you, so be warned. Nonetheless, if you really are willing to give this dark thriller-comedy a chance, I say it's definitely worth your time, especially for Franco's fantastic performance alone.

Don't do it

Don't spend any money watching this movie , it is a waste of your time and money!

Not a movie

This shouldn't be called movie. 100 minutes of stupidness and music, 10 minutes of boobs, 10 of wanna be poetic dialog.
Don't buy, don't watch, stay away.

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Spring Breakers
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  • Released: 2013

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