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A Neuroscientist Explains

By theguardian.com

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Customer Reviews

Guardian Sound Design Dept. Attacks!

Is a REPEATING BEEPING PHONE TONE something you want to hear in your headphones? Bad piano music over scientific explanations? Then this is the podcast for you! Horrible sound editing has ruined the long awaited return of this show. They’ve ruined the Science pod and they continue here with the same bad audio formula. Be creative and try to make it interesting by playing it straight, Guardian pod people - I dare you.

Horrible Noises

I tried to listen to 5 episodes; the few things I could hear made me want more, but the annoying sound effects drowned out the speakers

Smugness and poor format overpower content

I listenend to maybe 6 or 7 episodes of this, really tried to give it a chance, but could not stand it.
The neuroscientist of the title comes across as smug, arrogant and dismissive. What's worse is that he explains very little. He seems to have very little regard for the ideas or knowledge of guest specialists unless he knew or believed it in advance.His approach to guests is solely to satisfy his own (feigned?) curiosity - he doesn't bother to ask about things the listener might want to know.
Finally, his foil in all this is supposedly the show's producer, whose role is to play an idiot who wishes he wasn't there and "blimey, guv'nor! Who'da thought that, then?!"
The overall feel is that nobody at the Guardian cares much about podcasts - they just do it because they're told to.