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Sold In America

By Stitcher and E.W. Scripps Company, with Noor Tagouri

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Description

Sold in America is an eight-episode journey into the world of selling sex in the United States. Hosted by journalist and activist Noor Tagouri, this deeply personal, deeply reported series takes listeners across the country to meet the human faces of this billion-dollar trade – and uncovers its surprising misconceptions.

Customer Reviews

It’s All About How Great the Host Is

Wanted to love this, but the producers have made the atrocious decision to make this about the host Noor’s “personal journey.” So much of the first episode was all about her, how great she is, her life’s story, etc. We needed a journalistic approach here, something hard-hitting and professional, like a PBS Frontline documentary. I may try to stomach a later episode, but the “me me me” stuff in the opener really turned me off.

Not what I expected

I don’t doubt that the podcaster is genuinely motivated by this cause, but there’s an odd amount of… self promotion and first person narration. I’m not surprised someone who grew up with social media is this self-involved. Are you a lifestyle influencer or journalist?

Self Indulgent Reporter/Narrator

Too much ego, not enough substance. All of the ”I“ and ”we“ statements turn an important subject into “all about Noor.” The reporter insists on tying everything to her own personal thoughts and feelings as if her feelings were the story.