Description

Emmy award winner and veteran journalist Dan Rather brings hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness and guts in their reporting…from politics, the environment and international affairs. Buy a season pass and get new episodes throughout 2011.

    • $29.99

Description

Emmy award winner and veteran journalist Dan Rather brings hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness and guts in their reporting…from politics, the environment and international affairs. Buy a season pass and get new episodes throughout 2011.

    • EPISODE 1

    Addicted to Antibiotics

    (1/11/2011) Dan Rather Reports examines the alarming consequences of the overuse of antibiotics. Every year, more than 90,000 Americans die from superbugs that antibiotics cannot treat; these antibiotic-resistant infections, caused directly by the overuse of antibiotics, cost us more than $35 billion a year. We'll also investigate the role that doctors, patients, and American culture itself play in precipitating this crisis.
    But while resistance continues to threaten American lives, one country has managed to remain a safe haven from superbugs. We visit Norway, a global leader in prudent antibiotic use, and the nation with the lowest rate of antibiotic-resistant infections in the world. Dan Rather investigates how Norway has achieved what for so many others, would be nothing more than a pipe dream.

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    • 50 Minutes

    (1/11/2011) Dan Rather Reports examines the alarming consequences of the overuse of antibiotics. Every year, more than 90,000 Americans die from superbugs that antibiotics cannot treat; these antibiotic-resistant infections, caused directly by the overuse of antibiotics, cost us more than $35 billion a year. We'll also investigate the role that doctors, patients, and American culture itself play in precipitating this crisis.
    But while resistance continues to threaten American lives, one country has managed to remain a safe haven from superbugs. We visit Norway, a global leader in prudent antibiotic use, and the nation with the lowest rate of antibiotic-resistant infections in the world. Dan Rather investigates how Norway has achieved what for so many others, would be nothing more than a pipe dream.

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    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 2

    Help Wanted! (Not Here)

    (1/18/2011)Unemployment has become this nation’s biggest paradox. Corporate profits are at an all-time high, but millions of Americans are still out of work and many of the good-paying jobs that built and sustained this country’s middle class for decades are moving to far-away places...especially India.
    According to many in Washington and Wall Street, outsourcing is part of keeping American companies lean and competitive. There will be costs, they say, especially for displaced workers, but in the end India’s success will be America’s success -- a “win-win” for everyone.
    Others warn that we need to start thinking about just what it is we’re trying to win. Because even though corporations are thriving, in the global fight for jobs, America is losing big.

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    • 49 Minutes

    (1/18/2011)Unemployment has become this nation’s biggest paradox. Corporate profits are at an all-time high, but millions of Americans are still out of work and many of the good-paying jobs that built and sustained this country’s middle class for decades are moving to far-away places...especially India.
    According to many in Washington and Wall Street, outsourcing is part of keeping American companies lean and competitive. There will be costs, they say, especially for displaced workers, but in the end India’s success will be America’s success -- a “win-win” for everyone.
    Others warn that we need to start thinking about just what it is we’re trying to win. Because even though corporations are thriving, in the global fight for jobs, America is losing big.

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    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 3

    One Feisty Fish

    (1/25/2011) With its vibrant zebra stripes and needle sharp spines filled with venom, the lionfish looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Averaging only 12 inches long, this menacing interloper from half-way around the globe is taking over -- eating everything in sight. Its voracious appetite could spell disaster for the western Atlantic’s delicate eco-system and its commercial fishing industry – and a new effort to reduce their numbers by making them the new “it” delicacy isn’t happening fast enough.
    Also, Muhammad Yunus, a man who became famous as a "banker to the poor" in the third world -- and won a Nobel Prize in the process -- has launched a program in America to give the poor access to small, affordable loans. These microloans have been hailed as a key to ending poverty and the microcredit model has been imitated by organizations all over the world. But new studies have raised doubts and a recent crisis in India has shown that credit --even microcredit -- can be dangerous.

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    • 50 Minutes

    (1/25/2011) With its vibrant zebra stripes and needle sharp spines filled with venom, the lionfish looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Averaging only 12 inches long, this menacing interloper from half-way around the globe is taking over -- eating everything in sight. Its voracious appetite could spell disaster for the western Atlantic’s delicate eco-system and its commercial fishing industry – and a new effort to reduce their numbers by making them the new “it” delicacy isn’t happening fast enough.
    Also, Muhammad Yunus, a man who became famous as a "banker to the poor" in the third world -- and won a Nobel Prize in the process -- has launched a program in America to give the poor access to small, affordable loans. These microloans have been hailed as a key to ending poverty and the microcredit model has been imitated by organizations all over the world. But new studies have raised doubts and a recent crisis in India has shown that credit --even microcredit -- can be dangerous.

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    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 4

    Come Write-In, Senator

    (2/01/2011) Americans say their Washington politicians are too ideological, too polarized and they spend too much money. But what if there was a senator who won re-election without the backing of her party and now says she feels liberated to vote as she pleases...wants to compromise and is beholden to no one except her constituents? Lisa Murkowski, a Republican Senator from Alaska says that’s exactly what’s happened to her. This is the story of how the senator took on the Tea party, won re-election and became a different politician in the process.
    Also, an interview with Middle East expert Fouad Ajami about the uprising in Egypt.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (2/01/2011) Americans say their Washington politicians are too ideological, too polarized and they spend too much money. But what if there was a senator who won re-election without the backing of her party and now says she feels liberated to vote as she pleases...wants to compromise and is beholden to no one except her constituents? Lisa Murkowski, a Republican Senator from Alaska says that’s exactly what’s happened to her. This is the story of how the senator took on the Tea party, won re-election and became a different politician in the process.
    Also, an interview with Middle East expert Fouad Ajami about the uprising in Egypt.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 5

    Blood in the Name of Honor

    (2/08/2011) We analyze the uprising in Egypt with a Muslim adviser to President Obama and an executive with the Committee to Protect Journalists.
    Also, British Prime Minister David Cameron recently ignited a firestorm of controversy when he said that his country has been too tolerant of multiculturalism. He argued that it has allowed immigrants to maintain culturally segregated communities that can be breeding grounds for terrorism. The prime minister's critics said he was feeding intolerance. But there are calls for change that are coming from inside Britain's immigrant communities themselves, particularly from women who are concerned that the number of honor killings -- murder under the guise of protecting the family's honor -- are on the rise in Great Britain.

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    • 52 Minutes

    (2/08/2011) We analyze the uprising in Egypt with a Muslim adviser to President Obama and an executive with the Committee to Protect Journalists.
    Also, British Prime Minister David Cameron recently ignited a firestorm of controversy when he said that his country has been too tolerant of multiculturalism. He argued that it has allowed immigrants to maintain culturally segregated communities that can be breeding grounds for terrorism. The prime minister's critics said he was feeding intolerance. But there are calls for change that are coming from inside Britain's immigrant communities themselves, particularly from women who are concerned that the number of honor killings -- murder under the guise of protecting the family's honor -- are on the rise in Great Britain.

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    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 6

    A Precarious Peace

    (2/15/2011) For about five years, the United States has been funding and training new Palestinian security forces that now are a visible presence on the West Bank streets. In a previously unthinkable arrangement, these Palestinian forces are working shoulder to shoulder with its occupier, the Israeli military, to root out a common enemy: Hamas. The group, classified by the U.S. as a terrorist group and bent on the destruction of Israel, has largely been silenced in the West Bank. There hasn’t been a suicide bombing in Israel for about three years. And the West Bank’s economy is blooming.
    But with checkpoints, Israeli incursions into the West Bank and a growing community of Israeli settlers protected by Israeli troops, the average Palestinian in the West Bank is constantly reminded they are living under occupation. Many people we spoke to say this calm is fragile and could explode at any time.

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    • 52 Minutes

    (2/15/2011) For about five years, the United States has been funding and training new Palestinian security forces that now are a visible presence on the West Bank streets. In a previously unthinkable arrangement, these Palestinian forces are working shoulder to shoulder with its occupier, the Israeli military, to root out a common enemy: Hamas. The group, classified by the U.S. as a terrorist group and bent on the destruction of Israel, has largely been silenced in the West Bank. There hasn’t been a suicide bombing in Israel for about three years. And the West Bank’s economy is blooming.
    But with checkpoints, Israeli incursions into the West Bank and a growing community of Israeli settlers protected by Israeli troops, the average Palestinian in the West Bank is constantly reminded they are living under occupation. Many people we spoke to say this calm is fragile and could explode at any time.

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    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 7

    Just Plane Work

    (2/22/2011) Shoring up the American workforce has never been more important -- or more elusive. President Obama's recent announcement in India of deals that would create jobs back home may be much less than advertised, especially for workers starved for good news at the Boeing aircraft plant in Long Beach, CA. Tonight, the story of an airplane, a city, an embattled workforce and the job creation deal that’s supposed to save them all.
    Also, it's an out-of-the-way city in southern Brazil that is mostly unknown to Americans. But Governador Valadares has a special connection to America. Over the past few decades, an extraordinary number of its citizens have immigrated to the U.S. to work—so many that the city's economy became dependent on the dollars they were sending back home. And now, even though the Brazilian economy is surging, Valadares is being stung by tough economic conditions a hemisphere away.
    And NY Times stats expert Nate Silver on the 2012 presidential race.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (2/22/2011) Shoring up the American workforce has never been more important -- or more elusive. President Obama's recent announcement in India of deals that would create jobs back home may be much less than advertised, especially for workers starved for good news at the Boeing aircraft plant in Long Beach, CA. Tonight, the story of an airplane, a city, an embattled workforce and the job creation deal that’s supposed to save them all.
    Also, it's an out-of-the-way city in southern Brazil that is mostly unknown to Americans. But Governador Valadares has a special connection to America. Over the past few decades, an extraordinary number of its citizens have immigrated to the U.S. to work—so many that the city's economy became dependent on the dollars they were sending back home. And now, even though the Brazilian economy is surging, Valadares is being stung by tough economic conditions a hemisphere away.
    And NY Times stats expert Nate Silver on the 2012 presidential race.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 8

    Power Play

    (3/1/2011) A surprising look at nuclear power and how new developments in the field have created cleaner, more efficient reactors that could create a virtual “nuclear renaissance” -- but the price tag for building these new reactors may be more than the U.S. Department of Energy is ready for.
    Fifteen years after the end of apartheid, South Africa is struggling to implement the laws in its progressive constitution. Gays and lesbians in South Africa have more rights than many gay Americans, but that’s doesn’t mean they are safe. Lesbians are often the victims of corrective rape – a horrific crime where men sexually violate them in an effort to “correct” or “cure” their sexual orientation. Several non-governmental organizations claim corrective rape is on the rise, fuelled mostly by a growing homophobia in Africa.
    And an update on electronic voting machines -- in 2010, a concerned citizen in South Carolina began doing his own investigation into voting machines when a no-name candidate trounced an established politician in the primary. He’s been pouring thorough electronic voting records with help from some computer scientist. What they found is that the official certified vote counts often don’t match up with the data from the machines.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (3/1/2011) A surprising look at nuclear power and how new developments in the field have created cleaner, more efficient reactors that could create a virtual “nuclear renaissance” -- but the price tag for building these new reactors may be more than the U.S. Department of Energy is ready for.
    Fifteen years after the end of apartheid, South Africa is struggling to implement the laws in its progressive constitution. Gays and lesbians in South Africa have more rights than many gay Americans, but that’s doesn’t mean they are safe. Lesbians are often the victims of corrective rape – a horrific crime where men sexually violate them in an effort to “correct” or “cure” their sexual orientation. Several non-governmental organizations claim corrective rape is on the rise, fuelled mostly by a growing homophobia in Africa.
    And an update on electronic voting machines -- in 2010, a concerned citizen in South Carolina began doing his own investigation into voting machines when a no-name candidate trounced an established politician in the primary. He’s been pouring thorough electronic voting records with help from some computer scientist. What they found is that the official certified vote counts often don’t match up with the data from the machines.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 9

    Betty vs. Goliath

    (3/8/2011) On March 29, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of Dukes vs. Walmart. Betty Dukes is a 61-year-old Walmart greeter from California who says she has been discriminated against on the basis of her gender. She is not alone. Millions of women who have worked at Walmart may be become part of Dukes’ class action. But the Supreme Court will not be deciding the merits of the case - rather what’s at stake is the definition of what a class action can be. And that has everyone from big business to civil rights lawyers very invested in the outcome.
    And, as Col. Muammar Qaddafi shores up his defenses, but further weakens his international standing, we investigate a new kind of government that is rapidly burgeoning in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. Hundreds have signed up for a boot camp designed to bolster the expected assault on Tripoli. For the first time rebel military and political leaders reveal to us their current strategy and what they envision for the country's future.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (3/8/2011) On March 29, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of Dukes vs. Walmart. Betty Dukes is a 61-year-old Walmart greeter from California who says she has been discriminated against on the basis of her gender. She is not alone. Millions of women who have worked at Walmart may be become part of Dukes’ class action. But the Supreme Court will not be deciding the merits of the case - rather what’s at stake is the definition of what a class action can be. And that has everyone from big business to civil rights lawyers very invested in the outcome.
    And, as Col. Muammar Qaddafi shores up his defenses, but further weakens his international standing, we investigate a new kind of government that is rapidly burgeoning in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. Hundreds have signed up for a boot camp designed to bolster the expected assault on Tripoli. For the first time rebel military and political leaders reveal to us their current strategy and what they envision for the country's future.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 10

    ...Do Unto Others

    (3/22/2011) When Congress passed the controversial health care bill conservatives across the country vowed to fight it. But it turns out that there’s an interesting provision in the bill – one that provides an exemption for members of what are called "health-care-sharing ministries". The ministries have been around for years as a Christian alternative to traditional health insurance, but they have suddenly become big news for those who want out of Obama’s health care law. The ministries distribute their members’ medical bills among other members – all of whom have to make certain lifestyle commitments. Members are in good standing only if they are celibate outside of heterosexual marriage and drug-free; weekly church attendance is mandatory.
    Also, allegations of massive visa fraud and giant loopholes that critics say are allowing hi-tech multinational companies to discriminate against Americans.
    And, leading genome scientist Dr. Eric Lander on where the science is today, a decade after it was discovered.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes

    (3/22/2011) When Congress passed the controversial health care bill conservatives across the country vowed to fight it. But it turns out that there’s an interesting provision in the bill – one that provides an exemption for members of what are called "health-care-sharing ministries". The ministries have been around for years as a Christian alternative to traditional health insurance, but they have suddenly become big news for those who want out of Obama’s health care law. The ministries distribute their members’ medical bills among other members – all of whom have to make certain lifestyle commitments. Members are in good standing only if they are celibate outside of heterosexual marriage and drug-free; weekly church attendance is mandatory.
    Also, allegations of massive visa fraud and giant loopholes that critics say are allowing hi-tech multinational companies to discriminate against Americans.
    And, leading genome scientist Dr. Eric Lander on where the science is today, a decade after it was discovered.

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    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 11

    Mexican Standoff

    (3/29/2011) We've all read the newspapers and seen the headline surrounding the bloody drug war in Mexico. The death toll soars as the United States backs Mexico's war on drug trafficking and tensions between the two governments threaten to fray this vital partnership. So far, 34,000 Mexicans have been killed and now the drug cartels have expanded their reach from beyond the borders into all parts of the country.
    Anxiety is high and many are saying it's time for a radical re think. The 2006 election of President Calderon signaled a new cooperation. Calderon deployed his nation's military against the drug cartels who in recent years have grown into vicious criminal gangs. But some are saying what's being done now isn't enough.
    In this special Dan Rather Reports, we travel to Mexico City to meet with top experts and observers to find out what is happening behind the scenes and what the future of Mexico holds.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes

    (3/29/2011) We've all read the newspapers and seen the headline surrounding the bloody drug war in Mexico. The death toll soars as the United States backs Mexico's war on drug trafficking and tensions between the two governments threaten to fray this vital partnership. So far, 34,000 Mexicans have been killed and now the drug cartels have expanded their reach from beyond the borders into all parts of the country.
    Anxiety is high and many are saying it's time for a radical re think. The 2006 election of President Calderon signaled a new cooperation. Calderon deployed his nation's military against the drug cartels who in recent years have grown into vicious criminal gangs. But some are saying what's being done now isn't enough.
    In this special Dan Rather Reports, we travel to Mexico City to meet with top experts and observers to find out what is happening behind the scenes and what the future of Mexico holds.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 12

    The Dissident Disappeared

    (4/5/2011) The last U.S. television interview with Chinese activist Ai Weiwei before he was arrested by Chinese authorities. Weiwei is one of the most famous Chinese dissidents, as well as a world renowned artist and architect. He designed the so-called "birds nest" stadium that was the centerpiece of China's 2008 Olympic Games. But he has also been a constant thorn in the side of Chinese authorities, especially with his postings on the Internet. He's been detained before and suffered a brain hemorrhage after a beating by police.
    And also an encore presentation of our investigation of the big business of baseball in the Dominican Republic. The tiny country supplies more Major League Baseball talent than any country except the United States. The lure of big money is so strong that thousands of young Dominican boys give up everything, including an education, for a shot at the big leagues.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (4/5/2011) The last U.S. television interview with Chinese activist Ai Weiwei before he was arrested by Chinese authorities. Weiwei is one of the most famous Chinese dissidents, as well as a world renowned artist and architect. He designed the so-called "birds nest" stadium that was the centerpiece of China's 2008 Olympic Games. But he has also been a constant thorn in the side of Chinese authorities, especially with his postings on the Internet. He's been detained before and suffered a brain hemorrhage after a beating by police.
    And also an encore presentation of our investigation of the big business of baseball in the Dominican Republic. The tiny country supplies more Major League Baseball talent than any country except the United States. The lure of big money is so strong that thousands of young Dominican boys give up everything, including an education, for a shot at the big leagues.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 13

    The Mother Lode

    (4/12/2011) Afghanistan may be one of the poorest countries in the world economically, but when it comes to precious metals it is one of the richest. The rush to mine this underground treasure is going full bore. The Afghans don’t have the technology to do it themselves, but there is no shortage of countries willing to step in and help. The winner of the first big contract was supposed to be an example of how the country would use it riches to get on its feet economically. But turning metals into money hasn’t exactly gone as planned. A Chinese company won the first bid – worth billions of dollars – but there are serious concerns that the winning bid came about as a result of a thirty million dollar bribe.
    Also, the person in charge of BP's 20 billion dollar claims fund talks about the recovery in the Gulf of Mexico one year after the oil spill.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes

    (4/12/2011) Afghanistan may be one of the poorest countries in the world economically, but when it comes to precious metals it is one of the richest. The rush to mine this underground treasure is going full bore. The Afghans don’t have the technology to do it themselves, but there is no shortage of countries willing to step in and help. The winner of the first big contract was supposed to be an example of how the country would use it riches to get on its feet economically. But turning metals into money hasn’t exactly gone as planned. A Chinese company won the first bid – worth billions of dollars – but there are serious concerns that the winning bid came about as a result of a thirty million dollar bribe.
    Also, the person in charge of BP's 20 billion dollar claims fund talks about the recovery in the Gulf of Mexico one year after the oil spill.

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    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 14

    Gas Pains

    (4/19/2011) What's behind the sudden jump in gas prices may have nothing to do with supply or politics in the Middle East. Many lawmakers, analysts, consumer advocates and CEOs are pointing to another potential culprit -- commodity funds -- a hot Wall Street product.
    Also, as gasoline prices spike to some of their highest prices in history, and more people than ever are concerned about dependence on foreign oil and climate change, the stage may be set for a revolution in the way we drive. Electric car proponents say that 2011 may finally be the year in which drivers begin in earnest to make the switch from the pump … to the plug.
    And, new demand from Asia for rhinoceros horn is making make the rhino worth more dead than alive -- and one thing is for sure, if the slaughter continues the world may lose a species that has roamed the continent for millennia.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes

    (4/19/2011) What's behind the sudden jump in gas prices may have nothing to do with supply or politics in the Middle East. Many lawmakers, analysts, consumer advocates and CEOs are pointing to another potential culprit -- commodity funds -- a hot Wall Street product.
    Also, as gasoline prices spike to some of their highest prices in history, and more people than ever are concerned about dependence on foreign oil and climate change, the stage may be set for a revolution in the way we drive. Electric car proponents say that 2011 may finally be the year in which drivers begin in earnest to make the switch from the pump … to the plug.
    And, new demand from Asia for rhinoceros horn is making make the rhino worth more dead than alive -- and one thing is for sure, if the slaughter continues the world may lose a species that has roamed the continent for millennia.

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    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 15

    The Nuclear Option

    (4/26/2011) The earthquake and tsunami that ravaged parts of Japan and severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have sparked fears of radiation exposure and a potential meltdown. Here in the United States those realities have renewed the debate over the future of American nuclear power plants -- and have thrust nuclear energy development into the limelight as both America’s answer to its growing electricity needs as well as one of its greatest security threats.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes

    (4/26/2011) The earthquake and tsunami that ravaged parts of Japan and severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have sparked fears of radiation exposure and a potential meltdown. Here in the United States those realities have renewed the debate over the future of American nuclear power plants -- and have thrust nuclear energy development into the limelight as both America’s answer to its growing electricity needs as well as one of its greatest security threats.

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    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 16

    The Best of the Best

    (5/3/2011) In the light of Osama bin Laden’s death – a look inside the elite, highly secretive U.S. Special Forces.
    Also, one of the basic tenets of journalism is that you report only what you see and know to be true. But what happens if there’s an important story that no reporter can get to? That’s what’s happening in Syria, where there is no independent press and all foreign reporters have been kicked out. But story is still being told – thanks to some brave Syrians who are risking their lives to make sure the story gets out.
    And from China, the Internet is helping to get the truth out from under the thumb of the world’s most repressive regime.

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    • 50 Minutes

    (5/3/2011) In the light of Osama bin Laden’s death – a look inside the elite, highly secretive U.S. Special Forces.
    Also, one of the basic tenets of journalism is that you report only what you see and know to be true. But what happens if there’s an important story that no reporter can get to? That’s what’s happening in Syria, where there is no independent press and all foreign reporters have been kicked out. But story is still being told – thanks to some brave Syrians who are risking their lives to make sure the story gets out.
    And from China, the Internet is helping to get the truth out from under the thumb of the world’s most repressive regime.

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    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 17

    A National Disgrace

    (5/10/2011) This special two-hour report documents a pivotal year and a half in the Detroit Public Schools, set against a backdrop of history and the plight of one student desperate to succeed despite the odds.
    “A National Disgrace” is part historical documentary, part investigative report and part personal profile detailing the political strife, corruption, and systemic breakdown during the tumultuous 2009-2010 school year when the state of Michigan imposed new leadership on the school district. The result is a searing portrait of a local tragedy that asks the question, does the situation in Detroit demonstrate how we view public education? Is the real “national disgrace” the fact that something like this could happen at all?

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    • 1 Hour 45 Minutes

    (5/10/2011) This special two-hour report documents a pivotal year and a half in the Detroit Public Schools, set against a backdrop of history and the plight of one student desperate to succeed despite the odds.
    “A National Disgrace” is part historical documentary, part investigative report and part personal profile detailing the political strife, corruption, and systemic breakdown during the tumultuous 2009-2010 school year when the state of Michigan imposed new leadership on the school district. The result is a searing portrait of a local tragedy that asks the question, does the situation in Detroit demonstrate how we view public education? Is the real “national disgrace” the fact that something like this could happen at all?

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    • 1 Hour 45 Minutes
    • EPISODE 18

    The App Bubble

    (5/17/2011) Behind-the-scenes at Hashable - one of the many new social-media startups trying to prove they have what it takes to launch a successful social media platform in the highly competitive new tech landscape. Does Hashable have what it takes to break through the clutter? And even if it does, will it make money? Or is all the funding flowing to Hashable and other startups a sign of yet another bubble?
    Also, for years prosecutors from the National Marine Fisheries have gone after east coast fishermen as if they were the enemy. They have banned several fishermen for life and imposed huge fines – all without supervision or control. Until now – an independent investigation confirmed many of the fishermen’s allegations and revealed even more. It looks like the tide may be about to turn.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes

    (5/17/2011) Behind-the-scenes at Hashable - one of the many new social-media startups trying to prove they have what it takes to launch a successful social media platform in the highly competitive new tech landscape. Does Hashable have what it takes to break through the clutter? And even if it does, will it make money? Or is all the funding flowing to Hashable and other startups a sign of yet another bubble?
    Also, for years prosecutors from the National Marine Fisheries have gone after east coast fishermen as if they were the enemy. They have banned several fishermen for life and imposed huge fines – all without supervision or control. Until now – an independent investigation confirmed many of the fishermen’s allegations and revealed even more. It looks like the tide may be about to turn.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 19

    No Easy Answers

    (5/24/2011) On the heels of “A National Disgrace,” our two-hour special presentation on the crisis in the Detroit Public Schools, this week’s program focuses on several of the most important and controversial aspects of education reform including testing, the role of teachers unions, merit pay, charter schools, school leadership, and the so-called “privatization of public education.
    We feature interviews with some of the country’s biggest names in education: Dr. Andres Alonso, CEO of the Baltimore City Public Schools, who has been lauded as one of the most progressive – and successful – big-city superintendents in the country; Jon Schnur, founder of New Leaders for New Schools and one of the architects of Presidents Obama’s “Race To The Top” program; Dr. Pedro Noguera, an urban sociologist and professor of education at New York University, whose scholarship examines the ways in which schools are influenced by poverty; and Diane Ravitch, former US Assistant Secretary of Education and best-selling author of more than a dozen books about public education.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (5/24/2011) On the heels of “A National Disgrace,” our two-hour special presentation on the crisis in the Detroit Public Schools, this week’s program focuses on several of the most important and controversial aspects of education reform including testing, the role of teachers unions, merit pay, charter schools, school leadership, and the so-called “privatization of public education.
    We feature interviews with some of the country’s biggest names in education: Dr. Andres Alonso, CEO of the Baltimore City Public Schools, who has been lauded as one of the most progressive – and successful – big-city superintendents in the country; Jon Schnur, founder of New Leaders for New Schools and one of the architects of Presidents Obama’s “Race To The Top” program; Dr. Pedro Noguera, an urban sociologist and professor of education at New York University, whose scholarship examines the ways in which schools are influenced by poverty; and Diane Ravitch, former US Assistant Secretary of Education and best-selling author of more than a dozen books about public education.

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    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 20

    Mini-Meds

    (6/7/2011) An in-depth interview with Neil Barofsky, who recently stepped down as the Special Inspector General for TARP, more commonly known as the $700 billion dollar taxpayer bailout of the country’s biggest banks. Barofsky warns that the safeguards that are supposed to be in place to help avoid another bank meltdown are woefully insufficient – and that another, bigger crisis could be right around the corner.
    Also, an investigative report on mini-med health insurance. Many people buy mini-med insurance thinking they're covered in case of a catastrophic illness, only to find out later that it covers almost nothing. According to one former health insurance agent, his company encourages its agents to deceive their clients.
    And, despite being detained by Chinese authorities in a massive crackdown on free speech, artist and activist, Ai Weiwei's voice is still heard around the world. We take a look at the artist behind the man who has challenged Chinese authority.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (6/7/2011) An in-depth interview with Neil Barofsky, who recently stepped down as the Special Inspector General for TARP, more commonly known as the $700 billion dollar taxpayer bailout of the country’s biggest banks. Barofsky warns that the safeguards that are supposed to be in place to help avoid another bank meltdown are woefully insufficient – and that another, bigger crisis could be right around the corner.
    Also, an investigative report on mini-med health insurance. Many people buy mini-med insurance thinking they're covered in case of a catastrophic illness, only to find out later that it covers almost nothing. According to one former health insurance agent, his company encourages its agents to deceive their clients.
    And, despite being detained by Chinese authorities in a massive crackdown on free speech, artist and activist, Ai Weiwei's voice is still heard around the world. We take a look at the artist behind the man who has challenged Chinese authority.

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    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 21

    No Thanks for Everything

    (6/14/2011) With the unemployment rate over nine percent, why are lawmakers, lobbyists and pundits across the political spectrum clamoring to increase the flow of high-skilled guest workers from overseas? Business advocates say U.S. companies need the world’s “best and the brightest” in order to out-innovate global competitors and to create new jobs. Critics claim the federal guest worker visa programs are rife with abusive practices and that there’s no shortage of the best and brightest talent right here – especially now with more than 20 million Americans jobless or underemployed.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (6/14/2011) With the unemployment rate over nine percent, why are lawmakers, lobbyists and pundits across the political spectrum clamoring to increase the flow of high-skilled guest workers from overseas? Business advocates say U.S. companies need the world’s “best and the brightest” in order to out-innovate global competitors and to create new jobs. Critics claim the federal guest worker visa programs are rife with abusive practices and that there’s no shortage of the best and brightest talent right here – especially now with more than 20 million Americans jobless or underemployed.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 22

    All Is Not Forgiven

    (6/28/2011) When the priest sex abuse scandal exploded nearly 10 years ago, the Roman Catholic Church promised an era of no tolerance. Perhaps no one was publicly more contrite than Cardinal Roger Mahony, who until recently was the leader of the Los Angeles Archdiocese. But our investigation reveals that while Cardinal Mahony was promising sweeping new reforms, his archdiocese welcomed a priest with a dark and not-so-hidden past to this parish. As a result, more lives were ruined.
    Also, our cameras head out thousands of miles from the nearest land, to a place called the Eastern Garbage Patch. Trash has been quietly accumulating here for decades and most of it takes the form of millions of tiny plastic particles—a "plastic soup," some have called it. Nobody knows what damage it could be doing to the ocean ecosystem and many experts say it’s virtually impossible to clean up.
    And, our series on foreign work visas continues with the story of a foreign high-tech worker who has come to the United States.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (6/28/2011) When the priest sex abuse scandal exploded nearly 10 years ago, the Roman Catholic Church promised an era of no tolerance. Perhaps no one was publicly more contrite than Cardinal Roger Mahony, who until recently was the leader of the Los Angeles Archdiocese. But our investigation reveals that while Cardinal Mahony was promising sweeping new reforms, his archdiocese welcomed a priest with a dark and not-so-hidden past to this parish. As a result, more lives were ruined.
    Also, our cameras head out thousands of miles from the nearest land, to a place called the Eastern Garbage Patch. Trash has been quietly accumulating here for decades and most of it takes the form of millions of tiny plastic particles—a "plastic soup," some have called it. Nobody knows what damage it could be doing to the ocean ecosystem and many experts say it’s virtually impossible to clean up.
    And, our series on foreign work visas continues with the story of a foreign high-tech worker who has come to the United States.

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    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 23

    The New Space Race

    (7/12/2011) We travel farther than ever with a special round-table discussion about the future of space exploration. We are joined by Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 pilot; Leroy Chiao, Expedition 10 commander; Bobby Braun, NASA's chief technologist; and Ken Bowersox a former astronaut and now VP of Astronaut Safety and Mission Assurance at a private space company, SpaceX. The spirited conversation covers the scientific and technological accomplishments and discoveries made over the last 30 years of the space program, the opportunities for space exploration that lie ahead, and the imminent changes for the program when it comes to government-run vs. privately-run space flights.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (7/12/2011) We travel farther than ever with a special round-table discussion about the future of space exploration. We are joined by Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 pilot; Leroy Chiao, Expedition 10 commander; Bobby Braun, NASA's chief technologist; and Ken Bowersox a former astronaut and now VP of Astronaut Safety and Mission Assurance at a private space company, SpaceX. The spirited conversation covers the scientific and technological accomplishments and discoveries made over the last 30 years of the space program, the opportunities for space exploration that lie ahead, and the imminent changes for the program when it comes to government-run vs. privately-run space flights.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 24

    What Happened Next? The Mysterious Case of Kevin Xu

    (8/2/2011) An update on The Mysterious Case of Kevin Xu. The original story, nominated for a 2010 News and Documentary Emmy for Best Business Reporting followed a Chinese businessman who was trying to flood the US supply chain with enormous quantities of counterfeit prescription medication. We’ve now learned he had successfully penetrated pharmacies in the United Kingdom with phony medicine -- and that up to 25,000 packets of the fake medication were never recovered . Also, we follow fake drugs that are pouring into Africa from China and the impact they are having on the people there. But what has become of Kevin Xu?

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (8/2/2011) An update on The Mysterious Case of Kevin Xu. The original story, nominated for a 2010 News and Documentary Emmy for Best Business Reporting followed a Chinese businessman who was trying to flood the US supply chain with enormous quantities of counterfeit prescription medication. We’ve now learned he had successfully penetrated pharmacies in the United Kingdom with phony medicine -- and that up to 25,000 packets of the fake medication were never recovered . Also, we follow fake drugs that are pouring into Africa from China and the impact they are having on the people there. But what has become of Kevin Xu?

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 25

    What Happened Next: The Dalits of India

    (8/9/2011) An update on our story about India’s Dalits -- they used to be called “untouchables,” and though their name has changed their lot in life has not. Dalit women especially are denied a full education, work the most menial jobs and many are routinely physically and sexually abused. But one Dalit woman we met is breaking the cycle. We catch up with her a world away from her native country to see how her determination is changing lives back home.
    We also update our story about the practice of forced marriage in the United Kingdom. Families from immigrant communities often use the notion of “honor” to coerce young women into non-consensual marriages, sometimes leading to violence and even murder. This time around, we consider forced marriage on our side of the Atlantic. We meet two women who say it’s a big and hidden problem that needs to be brought to light.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (8/9/2011) An update on our story about India’s Dalits -- they used to be called “untouchables,” and though their name has changed their lot in life has not. Dalit women especially are denied a full education, work the most menial jobs and many are routinely physically and sexually abused. But one Dalit woman we met is breaking the cycle. We catch up with her a world away from her native country to see how her determination is changing lives back home.
    We also update our story about the practice of forced marriage in the United Kingdom. Families from immigrant communities often use the notion of “honor” to coerce young women into non-consensual marriages, sometimes leading to violence and even murder. This time around, we consider forced marriage on our side of the Atlantic. We meet two women who say it’s a big and hidden problem that needs to be brought to light.

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    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 26

    What Happened Next: Taking a Hit

    (8/23/2011) For years we've reported on the danger of concussions as it exploded from the pro ranks to the pee wees. Along the way we have talked to doctors, star athletes, coaches and sportscasters, but no story has
    touched us as much as that of a brave young man and his family who have struggled to turn tragedy into hope. Wheelchair bound after a tragic head injury on the football field, Zack Lystedt set a goal to walk across his high school graduation stage. We return on his graduation day and see how he went from an injured boy to "the kid who changed football."

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (8/23/2011) For years we've reported on the danger of concussions as it exploded from the pro ranks to the pee wees. Along the way we have talked to doctors, star athletes, coaches and sportscasters, but no story has
    touched us as much as that of a brave young man and his family who have struggled to turn tragedy into hope. Wheelchair bound after a tragic head injury on the football field, Zack Lystedt set a goal to walk across his high school graduation stage. We return on his graduation day and see how he went from an injured boy to "the kid who changed football."

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 27

    Special: A National Disgrace Revisited

    (8/30/2011) A special Dan Rather Reports takes an in-depth look at the deep challenges facing the Detroit Public Schools. From a fierce battle at the district
    level, to the heartbreaking story of Deanna Williams, a student trying to succeed, this report uses a local crisis to ask broad national questions. This version of the documentary includes a new interview with Deanna
    Williams after her freshman year at college.

    • CC
    • 1 Hour 52 Minutes

    (8/30/2011) A special Dan Rather Reports takes an in-depth look at the deep challenges facing the Detroit Public Schools. From a fierce battle at the district
    level, to the heartbreaking story of Deanna Williams, a student trying to succeed, this report uses a local crisis to ask broad national questions. This version of the documentary includes a new interview with Deanna
    Williams after her freshman year at college.

    • CC
    • 1 Hour 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 28

    Dan Rather Remembers 9/11

    (9/11/2011) Dan Rather Remembers 9/11 is a special broadcast hosted by the man who was watched by tens of millions of viewers on the day America was attacked. His personal recollections as well as poignant stories about how much our country has changed and sacrificed in the last decade.

    • CC
    • 1 Hour 7 Minutes

    (9/11/2011) Dan Rather Remembers 9/11 is a special broadcast hosted by the man who was watched by tens of millions of viewers on the day America was attacked. His personal recollections as well as poignant stories about how much our country has changed and sacrificed in the last decade.

    • CC
    • 1 Hour 7 Minutes
    • EPISODE 29

    What Really Happened At Bari Alai

    (9/13/2011) In May of 2009, Bari Alai, a remote outpost manned jointly by coalition soldiers and Afghan National Army forces, was overrun when it came under fire from the Taliban. Five coalition soldiers died protecting the post and 12 of their Afghan comrades surrendered to the Taliban and were taken prisoner. But were they truly prisoners or Taliban collaborators? Our 6-month investigation features never-seen-before footage of the deadly raid and looks at how much intelligence the Taliban insurgents received from inside the post.
    Also, training Afghans to protect their own country has become a multi-billion dollar mission of the United States military. But is the training working and will the Afghans fight? We meet Lieutenant General William Caldwell, the American general in charge of training Afghan troops.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (9/13/2011) In May of 2009, Bari Alai, a remote outpost manned jointly by coalition soldiers and Afghan National Army forces, was overrun when it came under fire from the Taliban. Five coalition soldiers died protecting the post and 12 of their Afghan comrades surrendered to the Taliban and were taken prisoner. But were they truly prisoners or Taliban collaborators? Our 6-month investigation features never-seen-before footage of the deadly raid and looks at how much intelligence the Taliban insurgents received from inside the post.
    Also, training Afghans to protect their own country has become a multi-billion dollar mission of the United States military. But is the training working and will the Afghans fight? We meet Lieutenant General William Caldwell, the American general in charge of training Afghan troops.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 30

    Bad Score

    (9/20/2011) While our students take mandatory evaluation tests nationwide – who is evaluating the evaluators? We investigate how the grading and evaluation of national, standardized testing works – or in some cases doesn’t work. We hear from a group of whistleblowers who tell us how erratically and unfairly the tests are scored. Also, an investigation into growing questions about the impact of a new class of pesticides on bees -- and ultimately, our entire food system. Are government regulators taking the potential threat seriously enough? And, As Japan continues to make headlines and the future of the country remains uncertain, we sit down with Academy Award nominated documentary film maker and Pulitzer Prize winning author, John Dower to discuss whether lessons from Japan’s past might help guide its future.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (9/20/2011) While our students take mandatory evaluation tests nationwide – who is evaluating the evaluators? We investigate how the grading and evaluation of national, standardized testing works – or in some cases doesn’t work. We hear from a group of whistleblowers who tell us how erratically and unfairly the tests are scored. Also, an investigation into growing questions about the impact of a new class of pesticides on bees -- and ultimately, our entire food system. Are government regulators taking the potential threat seriously enough? And, As Japan continues to make headlines and the future of the country remains uncertain, we sit down with Academy Award nominated documentary film maker and Pulitzer Prize winning author, John Dower to discuss whether lessons from Japan’s past might help guide its future.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 31

    Trouble On the Land

    (9/27/2011) As populations expand and food prices hit record highs, international investors are hoping to strike it rich in an unlikely place, Africa. We investigate one controversial deal, that some are calling a land grab, and the surprising cast of players involved - including one of America's oldest land grant universities.
    Also, the state of Michigan has been in a recession for over a decade with high unemployment and the hemorrhaging of a million jobs. Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has a controversial new plan to solve the state's jobs crisis -- while some states are trying to reduce the number of immigrants, Snyder hopes that a attracting more immigrants is the answer.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (9/27/2011) As populations expand and food prices hit record highs, international investors are hoping to strike it rich in an unlikely place, Africa. We investigate one controversial deal, that some are calling a land grab, and the surprising cast of players involved - including one of America's oldest land grant universities.
    Also, the state of Michigan has been in a recession for over a decade with high unemployment and the hemorrhaging of a million jobs. Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has a controversial new plan to solve the state's jobs crisis -- while some states are trying to reduce the number of immigrants, Snyder hopes that a attracting more immigrants is the answer.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 32

    Internal Combustion

    (10/4/2011) We revisit an investigation into a product that sits in millions of garages across America - plastic consumer gas cans. These red plastic gas containers can unexpectedly explode, sometimes simply from contact with static electricity from one's clothing. We began investigating this problem three years ago and despite independent studies that show that the problem can be solved with a small, inexpensive device, Blitz USA, the main producer of gas cans, has yet to install the part. Also, for a hundred years, Jewish Americans have helped shape every aspect of our life and culture - but for fifty years, Jewish practice has been on a downward slope. As our investigation suggests the trend has accelerated since the economic crisis in 2008. We'll look at what's at play, and the controversial step some small Jewish communities have taken to revive their ranks: bringing Jewish families over from the Holy Land. And, a conversation with economist Gary Shilling.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (10/4/2011) We revisit an investigation into a product that sits in millions of garages across America - plastic consumer gas cans. These red plastic gas containers can unexpectedly explode, sometimes simply from contact with static electricity from one's clothing. We began investigating this problem three years ago and despite independent studies that show that the problem can be solved with a small, inexpensive device, Blitz USA, the main producer of gas cans, has yet to install the part. Also, for a hundred years, Jewish Americans have helped shape every aspect of our life and culture - but for fifty years, Jewish practice has been on a downward slope. As our investigation suggests the trend has accelerated since the economic crisis in 2008. We'll look at what's at play, and the controversial step some small Jewish communities have taken to revive their ranks: bringing Jewish families over from the Holy Land. And, a conversation with economist Gary Shilling.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 33

    Taking It to the Street

    (10/11/2011) We take a look at the current global citizen uprising. Who is behind the “Occupy Wall Street” gatherings in New York, Los Angeles and dozens of other cities across America; and what are they looking to achieve? We talk exclusively with Grim Womyn, one of those helping to lead the online effort of this growing movement.
    Also, it is the zero accountability and responsibility for the economic downturn in this country for which Occupy Wall Street most vigorously speaks out. Attorney Jerry Silk, who could be called the people’s lawyer, is looking to change just that. Silk is currently suing dozens of big Wall Street banks, including Deutsche Bank, on behalf of Investor Funds – or how he sees it, on behalf of the American people.
    And, we speak with Fouad Ajami about the spark that ignited the Arab Spring, how this event provides that “these young Arabs will be given better than the tide that al Qaeda served them” and whether such an event is possible for Israel.
    Last but not least, an interview with Liberia’s president and one of three women recently awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes

    (10/11/2011) We take a look at the current global citizen uprising. Who is behind the “Occupy Wall Street” gatherings in New York, Los Angeles and dozens of other cities across America; and what are they looking to achieve? We talk exclusively with Grim Womyn, one of those helping to lead the online effort of this growing movement.
    Also, it is the zero accountability and responsibility for the economic downturn in this country for which Occupy Wall Street most vigorously speaks out. Attorney Jerry Silk, who could be called the people’s lawyer, is looking to change just that. Silk is currently suing dozens of big Wall Street banks, including Deutsche Bank, on behalf of Investor Funds – or how he sees it, on behalf of the American people.
    And, we speak with Fouad Ajami about the spark that ignited the Arab Spring, how this event provides that “these young Arabs will be given better than the tide that al Qaeda served them” and whether such an event is possible for Israel.
    Last but not least, an interview with Liberia’s president and one of three women recently awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 34

    Angel of the Desert

    (10/18/2011) We travel to the American southwest to what has become the most dangerous border in the world – the one that separates the United States from Mexico. On average, one person dies per day, trying to cross illegally into the United States through the Sonoran desert. And when these illegal immigrants disappear in this deadly desert terrain, the local authorities and border patrol rarely, if ever, search for them. But, a middle-aged, former mechanic from San Diego does just that. Rafael Hernandez is known as “The Angel in the Desert” to the many desperate families looking for loved ones who have disappeared while trying to cross into the United States. Often, it is a race against time.
    Also, Russia scholar Stephen Cohen on Vladimir Putin and finally, the dedication of the King Memorial in Washington.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (10/18/2011) We travel to the American southwest to what has become the most dangerous border in the world – the one that separates the United States from Mexico. On average, one person dies per day, trying to cross illegally into the United States through the Sonoran desert. And when these illegal immigrants disappear in this deadly desert terrain, the local authorities and border patrol rarely, if ever, search for them. But, a middle-aged, former mechanic from San Diego does just that. Rafael Hernandez is known as “The Angel in the Desert” to the many desperate families looking for loved ones who have disappeared while trying to cross into the United States. Often, it is a race against time.
    Also, Russia scholar Stephen Cohen on Vladimir Putin and finally, the dedication of the King Memorial in Washington.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 35

    The Un-Banked

    (10/25/2011) As the recession grinds into its third year there’s a palpable anger growing in America – and one of the main targets of that anger is big banks. There was an outcry recently when Bank of America announced an unprecedented $5 a month fee on debit card users. Wells Fargo and Chase are testing their own new debit fees, and customers far and wide are saying they’ve had enough. They’re taking their frustration online, using an array of social media to encourage people to leave their big banks in favor of small community banks or credit unions. We take a look at how an organization like change.org and an online movement like Bank Transfer Day are helping every day, average people send the big banks a message. Also, economist Jeffrey Sachs on the corporatization of the U.S.

    • CC
    • 46 Minutes

    (10/25/2011) As the recession grinds into its third year there’s a palpable anger growing in America – and one of the main targets of that anger is big banks. There was an outcry recently when Bank of America announced an unprecedented $5 a month fee on debit card users. Wells Fargo and Chase are testing their own new debit fees, and customers far and wide are saying they’ve had enough. They’re taking their frustration online, using an array of social media to encourage people to leave their big banks in favor of small community banks or credit unions. We take a look at how an organization like change.org and an online movement like Bank Transfer Day are helping every day, average people send the big banks a message. Also, economist Jeffrey Sachs on the corporatization of the U.S.

    • CC
    • 46 Minutes
    • EPISODE 36

    Take a Lesson from Singapore

    (11/1/2011) The first in our new series about global education: As recently as the 1960’s, Singapore was a sleepy backwater with a 40% illiteracy rate and a school system that served only the elite. Today, it is a global economic powerhouse, and its students have scored at the top of every international math, science and literacy test for the last decade. By the end of tenth grade, most Singaporeans are almost two school years ahead of most American students.
    How and why have Singapore’s students managed to skyrocket past the rest of the developed world so quickly, while American students have only continued to sink further in the world rankings? Could Singapore’s approach to education provide lessons for how we could reform our own schools?

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes

    (11/1/2011) The first in our new series about global education: As recently as the 1960’s, Singapore was a sleepy backwater with a 40% illiteracy rate and a school system that served only the elite. Today, it is a global economic powerhouse, and its students have scored at the top of every international math, science and literacy test for the last decade. By the end of tenth grade, most Singaporeans are almost two school years ahead of most American students.
    How and why have Singapore’s students managed to skyrocket past the rest of the developed world so quickly, while American students have only continued to sink further in the world rankings? Could Singapore’s approach to education provide lessons for how we could reform our own schools?

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 37

    An American Nightmare

    (11/8/2011) A six-month investigation into what some are calling the biggest case of human trafficking in U.S. history. Gulf Coast shipbuilder Signal International stands accused of luring more than 500 Indian workers into years of what amounts to indentured servitude. The workers say that Signal promised them the American dream: good jobs in the U.S and Green Cards for them and their families. But the Indians say the company instead trapped them in an American nightmare.
    The workers were housed in overcrowded trailers, strung along with false hopes, and threatened with financial ruin if they stepped out of line. They were away from family and friends for years before they finally dared to speak out and take a stand.
    Also, an update on the Castle Doctrine, a new breed of law that is rapidly giving Americans more rights to use deadly force to defend themselves and their property.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (11/8/2011) A six-month investigation into what some are calling the biggest case of human trafficking in U.S. history. Gulf Coast shipbuilder Signal International stands accused of luring more than 500 Indian workers into years of what amounts to indentured servitude. The workers say that Signal promised them the American dream: good jobs in the U.S and Green Cards for them and their families. But the Indians say the company instead trapped them in an American nightmare.
    The workers were housed in overcrowded trailers, strung along with false hopes, and threatened with financial ruin if they stepped out of line. They were away from family and friends for years before they finally dared to speak out and take a stand.
    Also, an update on the Castle Doctrine, a new breed of law that is rapidly giving Americans more rights to use deadly force to defend themselves and their property.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 38

    Avoiding the Auction Block

    (11/15/2011) Despite new federal measures to slow foreclosures, thousands of homes continue to be auctioned off every month. One of the hardest hit states is California. We travel to the Golden State to meet with homeowners desperate to avoid the auction block...then we track their loans all the way to Wall Street where investors have lost their shirts thanks to loans that started in California. Also, a look at how your taxpayer dollars have been spent in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Commission on Wartime Contracting estimates that between $30 and $60 billion have been lost to contract waste and fraud -- that's approx $12 million every day for the past 10 years! Some examples of that waste in Iraq include: a $227 million water treatment plant that has never worked correctly; a $300 million power plant in Kabul which is seldom used because it's too expensive for the Afghan government to operate; and a $40 million prison that was abandoned before it was finished. And, a tale of two cities; Joplin, MO, and Greensburg, KS, both rebuilding after killer tornadoes.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    (11/15/2011) Despite new federal measures to slow foreclosures, thousands of homes continue to be auctioned off every month. One of the hardest hit states is California. We travel to the Golden State to meet with homeowners desperate to avoid the auction block...then we track their loans all the way to Wall Street where investors have lost their shirts thanks to loans that started in California. Also, a look at how your taxpayer dollars have been spent in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Commission on Wartime Contracting estimates that between $30 and $60 billion have been lost to contract waste and fraud -- that's approx $12 million every day for the past 10 years! Some examples of that waste in Iraq include: a $227 million water treatment plant that has never worked correctly; a $300 million power plant in Kabul which is seldom used because it's too expensive for the Afghan government to operate; and a $40 million prison that was abandoned before it was finished. And, a tale of two cities; Joplin, MO, and Greensburg, KS, both rebuilding after killer tornadoes.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 39

    Dan Rather Remembers Pearl Harbor

    (12/6/2011) It’s been 70 years since the day “which will live in infamy,” – the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. This 90-minute special takes an expansive look at the history and meaning behind Pearl Harbor: from the harrowing recollections of survivors now in their late 80s and 90s, to a Japanese school group coming to Hawaii to learn about the war. We hear the story behind the building of the famed memorial to the USS Arizona, what the attack meant for local Hawaiians and reflections on the meaning of sacrifice from a war-decorated Marine who now oversees the fallen heroes buried at Hawaii’s Punchbowl national cemetery.

    • CC
    • 1 Hour 18 Minutes

    (12/6/2011) It’s been 70 years since the day “which will live in infamy,” – the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. This 90-minute special takes an expansive look at the history and meaning behind Pearl Harbor: from the harrowing recollections of survivors now in their late 80s and 90s, to a Japanese school group coming to Hawaii to learn about the war. We hear the story behind the building of the famed memorial to the USS Arizona, what the attack meant for local Hawaiians and reflections on the meaning of sacrifice from a war-decorated Marine who now oversees the fallen heroes buried at Hawaii’s Punchbowl national cemetery.

    • CC
    • 1 Hour 18 Minutes
    • EPISODE 40

    Best of Dan Rather Reports 2011

    (12/20/2011) From the Middle East to Main Street USA – a look back at some of our favorite stories from 2011.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (12/20/2011) From the Middle East to Main Street USA – a look back at some of our favorite stories from 2011.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
© 2011 HDNet LLC

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