Description

Emmy award winner and veteran journalist Dan Rather brings hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness and guts in their reporting…from politics, the environment and international affairs. Buy a season pass and get new episodes throughout 2012.

    • $29.99

Description

Emmy award winner and veteran journalist Dan Rather brings hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness and guts in their reporting…from politics, the environment and international affairs. Buy a season pass and get new episodes throughout 2012.

    • EPISODE 1

    Finnish First

    (1/17/2012) In just 30 years, Finland transformed its school system from one that was mediocre and inequitable, to one that consistently produces some of the world's best students, while virtually eliminating an achievement gap. And they do it without standardizing testing.

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    • 53 Minutes

    (1/17/2012) In just 30 years, Finland transformed its school system from one that was mediocre and inequitable, to one that consistently produces some of the world's best students, while virtually eliminating an achievement gap. And they do it without standardizing testing.

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    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 2

    All for a Bowl of Soup

    (1/24/2012) Shark finning is the term used when fishermen pull live sharks from the water, slice off their fins and then dump them back into the water while still alive. Without their fins the sharks die a slow and agonizing death, usually of suffocation. And, the practice is on the rise - feeding the growing appetite for shark fin soup.
    Our investigation follows the practice of shark finning from the fishermen who are pushing these animals to the brink of extinction - all in the name of a cultural delicacy - to the legislative efforts attempting to ban this practice in the U.S. and throughout the world.
    Also, Linda Darling-Hammond from Stanford University explains why it’s important for the United States to look to educational systems in foreign countries as a model of how we can improve our schools.

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    • 50 Minutes

    (1/24/2012) Shark finning is the term used when fishermen pull live sharks from the water, slice off their fins and then dump them back into the water while still alive. Without their fins the sharks die a slow and agonizing death, usually of suffocation. And, the practice is on the rise - feeding the growing appetite for shark fin soup.
    Our investigation follows the practice of shark finning from the fishermen who are pushing these animals to the brink of extinction - all in the name of a cultural delicacy - to the legislative efforts attempting to ban this practice in the U.S. and throughout the world.
    Also, Linda Darling-Hammond from Stanford University explains why it’s important for the United States to look to educational systems in foreign countries as a model of how we can improve our schools.

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    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 3

    A Fighting Chance

    (2/7/2012) Once an impressive high school athlete in Virginia, Daniel Rodriguez had big dreams of playing college football, but a detour in his life sent him to serve as a U.S. Infantryman in Afghanistan. However, his gridiron dreams never died. The combat loss of his best friend, Pfc. Kevin Thomson, only strengthened Rodriguez’s resolve to bring to reality the dreams he and Thomson talked about in war. Rodriguez promised Thomson that he would pursue football if he ever made it home -- and that’s where our story picks up.
    Rodriguez’s promise has set him on a quest to make a Division One football program as a 24-year-old injured veteran -- and his skills and discipline are drawing the attention of the very school where he dreams of playing, Virginia Tech.
    Also, as Libya slowly begins to stabilize after the bloodshed and civil strife that wracked the country through most of last year, we travel to the capital city of Tripoli to witness how business is driving the success of this new nation. Businessmen from around the world are heading to Libya, hoping for a slice of the multi-billion dollar contracts that the huge oil reserves here will soon provide.

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    • 52 Minutes

    (2/7/2012) Once an impressive high school athlete in Virginia, Daniel Rodriguez had big dreams of playing college football, but a detour in his life sent him to serve as a U.S. Infantryman in Afghanistan. However, his gridiron dreams never died. The combat loss of his best friend, Pfc. Kevin Thomson, only strengthened Rodriguez’s resolve to bring to reality the dreams he and Thomson talked about in war. Rodriguez promised Thomson that he would pursue football if he ever made it home -- and that’s where our story picks up.
    Rodriguez’s promise has set him on a quest to make a Division One football program as a 24-year-old injured veteran -- and his skills and discipline are drawing the attention of the very school where he dreams of playing, Virginia Tech.
    Also, as Libya slowly begins to stabilize after the bloodshed and civil strife that wracked the country through most of last year, we travel to the capital city of Tripoli to witness how business is driving the success of this new nation. Businessmen from around the world are heading to Libya, hoping for a slice of the multi-billion dollar contracts that the huge oil reserves here will soon provide.

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    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 4

    The Doctor Is Out

    (2/14/2012) We travel to the place where there are more people age 100 and over than anywhere else in the world: Okinawa, Japan. And they're not just living longer there, they're living healthfully and independently into old age. As our nation's age boom begins what secrets can we take away from the old people of Okinawa? Also, in many medical circles, Dr. Donald Berwick’s name is synonymous with “quality.” Doctors and health officials around the globe seek out his advice, and he has been credited with major advances in how healthcare is delivered. In July 2010, President Obama used a recess appointment to put Dr. Berwick in charge of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the little known government agency that just so happens to be one of the most important players in American health care. But as soon as Dr. Berwick arrived in Washington, he became linked with Obamacare, and opponents of the health reform bill pledged to keep him from being confirmed. They called him a rationer and a proponent of socialized medicine, and said he was not qualified for office. Tonight, Dr. Donald Berwick makes his case.

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    • 52 Minutes

    (2/14/2012) We travel to the place where there are more people age 100 and over than anywhere else in the world: Okinawa, Japan. And they're not just living longer there, they're living healthfully and independently into old age. As our nation's age boom begins what secrets can we take away from the old people of Okinawa? Also, in many medical circles, Dr. Donald Berwick’s name is synonymous with “quality.” Doctors and health officials around the globe seek out his advice, and he has been credited with major advances in how healthcare is delivered. In July 2010, President Obama used a recess appointment to put Dr. Berwick in charge of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the little known government agency that just so happens to be one of the most important players in American health care. But as soon as Dr. Berwick arrived in Washington, he became linked with Obamacare, and opponents of the health reform bill pledged to keep him from being confirmed. They called him a rationer and a proponent of socialized medicine, and said he was not qualified for office. Tonight, Dr. Donald Berwick makes his case.

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    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 5

    Stealth Spy

    (2/21/2012) An American engineer was convicted of espionage after selling stealth secrets to China. But were they really secrets? An investigation of American technology transfer to countries around the world.

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    • 48 Minutes

    (2/21/2012) An American engineer was convicted of espionage after selling stealth secrets to China. But were they really secrets? An investigation of American technology transfer to countries around the world.

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    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 6

    A Greek Tragedy

    (2/28/2012) The economic crisis is becoming a disaster to many Greeks with the fallout spreading to children. Some parents are sending their children to live with relatives because they can no longer afford to keep them.
    Also, since the collapse of the Soviet Union two decades ago, most of Eastern Europe has settled into democracy, but under the iron fisted regime of Alexander Lukashenko, Belarus is like a trip back in time. We profile journalist Natallia Radina, who recently escaped the inhuman conditions of a prison in Belarus. Her crime? Organizing opposition.
    And, while most of the news from the Amazon rainforest over the past two decades has been a picture of large scale deforestation and mass extinctions, we actually have some good news to report. Through the unlikely pairing of the American agri-business giant Cargill and the environmental group, The Nature Conservancy, a model has been created that could help save the world’s forests.

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    • 49 Minutes

    (2/28/2012) The economic crisis is becoming a disaster to many Greeks with the fallout spreading to children. Some parents are sending their children to live with relatives because they can no longer afford to keep them.
    Also, since the collapse of the Soviet Union two decades ago, most of Eastern Europe has settled into democracy, but under the iron fisted regime of Alexander Lukashenko, Belarus is like a trip back in time. We profile journalist Natallia Radina, who recently escaped the inhuman conditions of a prison in Belarus. Her crime? Organizing opposition.
    And, while most of the news from the Amazon rainforest over the past two decades has been a picture of large scale deforestation and mass extinctions, we actually have some good news to report. Through the unlikely pairing of the American agri-business giant Cargill and the environmental group, The Nature Conservancy, a model has been created that could help save the world’s forests.

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    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 7

    Case of the Century

    (3/20/2012) Next week, the eyes of the nation will be on the Supreme Court for the oral arguments in what is being called “The Case of the Century.” At issue is whether President Obama’s signature legislative accomplishment, the health care law, will be found to be constitutional. The legal, political and social stakes couldn’t be higher.
    Dahlia Lithwick, senior editor at Slate, will serve as a special guest contributor for this report, taking viewers beyond political posturing to the key component of the law being challenged in court. Is this law in keeping with the powers of Congress or does it go too far? The public thinks it will be found to be unconstitutional, but many legal scholars, including conservatives, disagree.
    To get at the heart of this disconnect, we speak with people on all sides of this issue, providing a nuanced sense of how we got to the point where nine men and women, all unelected, will decide the fate of one of the most divisive pieces of legislation in half a century.

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    • 53 Minutes

    (3/20/2012) Next week, the eyes of the nation will be on the Supreme Court for the oral arguments in what is being called “The Case of the Century.” At issue is whether President Obama’s signature legislative accomplishment, the health care law, will be found to be constitutional. The legal, political and social stakes couldn’t be higher.
    Dahlia Lithwick, senior editor at Slate, will serve as a special guest contributor for this report, taking viewers beyond political posturing to the key component of the law being challenged in court. Is this law in keeping with the powers of Congress or does it go too far? The public thinks it will be found to be unconstitutional, but many legal scholars, including conservatives, disagree.
    To get at the heart of this disconnect, we speak with people on all sides of this issue, providing a nuanced sense of how we got to the point where nine men and women, all unelected, will decide the fate of one of the most divisive pieces of legislation in half a century.

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    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 7

    The Queen of Green

    (4/10/2012) Average Americans may not know Mary Nichols, but everyone from the oil industry to the big automakers definitely know who she is. She runs the agency in California responsible for setting the state’s air quality standards and the decisions made by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) have led to big changes in the way cars have been made over the years. Now the agency has set its sights on global warming. And, In the wake of declining traditional newspapers, hundreds of online news outlets have emerged across the country. A large percentage of these outlets, many of them independent news sites, survive by getting 501c3 status from the IRS. But the problem is that the IRS has been taking a very long time to grant 501c3 status. Now there is fear that some of these outlets won't survive if they don't hear from the IRS soon, which will leave us all with far fewer sources of news. Also, an update on our story about the controversial partnership between Iowa State University and Agrisol.

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    • 50 Minutes

    (4/10/2012) Average Americans may not know Mary Nichols, but everyone from the oil industry to the big automakers definitely know who she is. She runs the agency in California responsible for setting the state’s air quality standards and the decisions made by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) have led to big changes in the way cars have been made over the years. Now the agency has set its sights on global warming. And, In the wake of declining traditional newspapers, hundreds of online news outlets have emerged across the country. A large percentage of these outlets, many of them independent news sites, survive by getting 501c3 status from the IRS. But the problem is that the IRS has been taking a very long time to grant 501c3 status. Now there is fear that some of these outlets won't survive if they don't hear from the IRS soon, which will leave us all with far fewer sources of news. Also, an update on our story about the controversial partnership between Iowa State University and Agrisol.

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    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 8

    A Dire Strait

    (3/27/2012) Off the southern coast of Iran lies the Strait of Hormuz, a vital waterway linking the Persian Gulf to the Arabian Sea. Twenty % of the world's oil supply flows daily through the Strait and the US intends to keep it that way, especially in the face of threats by Iran to shut it down. With this strip of water becoming more dangerous by the day, the US is beefing up its naval presence in the region. We saw the situation for ourselves, aboard the mighty aircraft carrier the USS Carl Vinson.
    Also, the US Navy's Fifth Fleet is based in Bahrain, a tiny kingdom off the coast of Saudi Arabia. With tensions on the rise in the Gulf, the Navy needs more than ever a 'safe harbor' from which to stage its naval operations and keep an eye on Iran. But for more than a year, Bahrainis have been pushing for more freedom and the ongoing clashes have caused deaths and hundreds of injuries, leaving the US caught in the middle between a strategic ally and the democratic yearnings of a repressed population.

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    • 52 Minutes

    (3/27/2012) Off the southern coast of Iran lies the Strait of Hormuz, a vital waterway linking the Persian Gulf to the Arabian Sea. Twenty % of the world's oil supply flows daily through the Strait and the US intends to keep it that way, especially in the face of threats by Iran to shut it down. With this strip of water becoming more dangerous by the day, the US is beefing up its naval presence in the region. We saw the situation for ourselves, aboard the mighty aircraft carrier the USS Carl Vinson.
    Also, the US Navy's Fifth Fleet is based in Bahrain, a tiny kingdom off the coast of Saudi Arabia. With tensions on the rise in the Gulf, the Navy needs more than ever a 'safe harbor' from which to stage its naval operations and keep an eye on Iran. But for more than a year, Bahrainis have been pushing for more freedom and the ongoing clashes have caused deaths and hundreds of injuries, leaving the US caught in the middle between a strategic ally and the democratic yearnings of a repressed population.

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    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 10

    A Panamanian Passageway

    (4/17/2012) Panama is both literally and economically at the center of the hemisphere. The tiny country connects North and South America and is home to the Panama Canal, which is traversed by five percent of all goods traded worldwide. But the country’s unique geography has a dark side: Panama borders Colombia, the world’s largest producer of cocaine. And almost all cocaine bound to the U.S. first passes through Panama, or along its coasts. As Panama’s economy sizzles, the tiny country is being is threatened by the same lethal mix of guns, drugs and dirty money that has brought chaos elsewhere in Central America. And the United States government has taken notice. We provide exclusive access to new initiatives that Washington hopes will choke off one of the most important pipelines for illegal drugs – and allow Panama to continue its economic growth. Also, an interview with legendary journalist and author Gay Talese on the state of the news business.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (4/17/2012) Panama is both literally and economically at the center of the hemisphere. The tiny country connects North and South America and is home to the Panama Canal, which is traversed by five percent of all goods traded worldwide. But the country’s unique geography has a dark side: Panama borders Colombia, the world’s largest producer of cocaine. And almost all cocaine bound to the U.S. first passes through Panama, or along its coasts. As Panama’s economy sizzles, the tiny country is being is threatened by the same lethal mix of guns, drugs and dirty money that has brought chaos elsewhere in Central America. And the United States government has taken notice. We provide exclusive access to new initiatives that Washington hopes will choke off one of the most important pipelines for illegal drugs – and allow Panama to continue its economic growth. Also, an interview with legendary journalist and author Gay Talese on the state of the news business.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 11

    China in the Caribbean

    (4/24/2012) Many believe that within the next decade, China, already the largest holder of U.S. debt, will replace the United States as the biggest economy in the world. And now, the Chinese are moving closer to America’s doorstep. Our six-month investigation has found that Beijing is quietly handing out massive loans to countries from Trinidad and Tobago to the Bahamas. These loans are being used to build everything from enormous infrastructure projects to luxury resorts.
    While many of these tiny island nations are desperate for the cash infusion, there are some who believe that this is just a form of “Chinese Colonialism.” So far, Beijing’s actions have been solely economic, but some worry that the next step could be the establishment of Chinese military bases just off American shores. According to some leaders in the region, America has lost interest in the Caribbean…and now China is moving in.

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    • 54 Minutes

    (4/24/2012) Many believe that within the next decade, China, already the largest holder of U.S. debt, will replace the United States as the biggest economy in the world. And now, the Chinese are moving closer to America’s doorstep. Our six-month investigation has found that Beijing is quietly handing out massive loans to countries from Trinidad and Tobago to the Bahamas. These loans are being used to build everything from enormous infrastructure projects to luxury resorts.
    While many of these tiny island nations are desperate for the cash infusion, there are some who believe that this is just a form of “Chinese Colonialism.” So far, Beijing’s actions have been solely economic, but some worry that the next step could be the establishment of Chinese military bases just off American shores. According to some leaders in the region, America has lost interest in the Caribbean…and now China is moving in.

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    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 12

    Adopted or Abducted?

    (5/1/2012) We examine the treatment of unwed mothers in the 1950’s through the 1970’s…and today. In a sweeping and exhaustive six month investigation that spanned from Australia to the United States, we conducted nearly one hundred interviews with victims of forced adoptions – some of them speaking for the very first time. What we found was a widespread and shocking practice, even at the height of the sexual revolution in the 1960’s and 70’s when unwed pregnancy was still seen as a disgrace, of babies born out of wedlock forcefully put up for adoption.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (5/1/2012) We examine the treatment of unwed mothers in the 1950’s through the 1970’s…and today. In a sweeping and exhaustive six month investigation that spanned from Australia to the United States, we conducted nearly one hundred interviews with victims of forced adoptions – some of them speaking for the very first time. What we found was a widespread and shocking practice, even at the height of the sexual revolution in the 1960’s and 70’s when unwed pregnancy was still seen as a disgrace, of babies born out of wedlock forcefully put up for adoption.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 13

    The Most Unconventional Conservative

    (5/8/2012) As the world reflects on the first anniversary of the death of Osama bin Laden, we take a look at what it means to be Muslim in America. In this post-9/11 world, top secret reports uncovered by the Associated Press reveal the New York City Police Department has monitored many Muslim American communities well beyond the city's borders. The surveillance tactics have come under serious fire -- critics have called it spying, and many Muslim American groups worry this could be a potential wide scale violation of civil rights. We speak to the very controversial Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, an American-born Muslim and the president of the American Islamic Forum for Democracy, who shares his surprising beliefs on how to prevent future acts of terrorism and the critical role Muslim Americans must play to protect this country. Also, an update on our "Castle Doctrine" report and the controversial breed of gun laws center stage in the Trayvon Martin shooting.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (5/8/2012) As the world reflects on the first anniversary of the death of Osama bin Laden, we take a look at what it means to be Muslim in America. In this post-9/11 world, top secret reports uncovered by the Associated Press reveal the New York City Police Department has monitored many Muslim American communities well beyond the city's borders. The surveillance tactics have come under serious fire -- critics have called it spying, and many Muslim American groups worry this could be a potential wide scale violation of civil rights. We speak to the very controversial Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, an American-born Muslim and the president of the American Islamic Forum for Democracy, who shares his surprising beliefs on how to prevent future acts of terrorism and the critical role Muslim Americans must play to protect this country. Also, an update on our "Castle Doctrine" report and the controversial breed of gun laws center stage in the Trayvon Martin shooting.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 14

    The A-List: A Conversation in Hollywood

    (5/15/2012) A special live broadcast from Los Angeles with a panel discussion on the state of television. As television grapples with its own evolution in the 21st Century, actors, critics and fans are reaching for content delivered through their remote. Academy Award® nominee Don Cheadle, Ed Helms, Academy Award® nominee William H. Macy, and Emmy Award® nominee Linda Wallem join us for a no-holds-barred conversation on whether television is surpassing feature films as Hollywood’s premier content provider, the ongoing struggle for balance with emerging digital platforms and the battle for viewers’ attention.

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    • 53 Minutes

    (5/15/2012) A special live broadcast from Los Angeles with a panel discussion on the state of television. As television grapples with its own evolution in the 21st Century, actors, critics and fans are reaching for content delivered through their remote. Academy Award® nominee Don Cheadle, Ed Helms, Academy Award® nominee William H. Macy, and Emmy Award® nominee Linda Wallem join us for a no-holds-barred conversation on whether television is surpassing feature films as Hollywood’s premier content provider, the ongoing struggle for balance with emerging digital platforms and the battle for viewers’ attention.

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    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 15

    A Hunger That Never Ends

    (5/22/2012) Every year, the U.S. sends millions of dollars worth of emergency food aid to desperate countries in Africa, but millions still go hungry. And, with the world’s exploding population and the challenges of climate change, the stakes surrounding the world’s food shortage couldn’t be higher.
    As world leaders at the recent G-8 Summit discussed more ways to promote food security and agricultural development in Africa, we focus on Niger, where exciting new ideas are being put into practice…actually growing hope in the desert. New programs are teaching Nigeriens to grow crops that thrive in the desert climate, perhaps eventually putting an end to Africa’s food crisis. Also, we revisit a story we did a few years ago on water contamination at Camp Lejeune, NC. Up to a million marines and their families were exposed to the contamination, which measured many times above the legal limit. Today, many former Lejeune residents are suffering from illnesses like cancer – and they want answers.

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    • 50 Minutes

    (5/22/2012) Every year, the U.S. sends millions of dollars worth of emergency food aid to desperate countries in Africa, but millions still go hungry. And, with the world’s exploding population and the challenges of climate change, the stakes surrounding the world’s food shortage couldn’t be higher.
    As world leaders at the recent G-8 Summit discussed more ways to promote food security and agricultural development in Africa, we focus on Niger, where exciting new ideas are being put into practice…actually growing hope in the desert. New programs are teaching Nigeriens to grow crops that thrive in the desert climate, perhaps eventually putting an end to Africa’s food crisis. Also, we revisit a story we did a few years ago on water contamination at Camp Lejeune, NC. Up to a million marines and their families were exposed to the contamination, which measured many times above the legal limit. Today, many former Lejeune residents are suffering from illnesses like cancer – and they want answers.

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    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 16

    Dan Rather Remembers Pearl Harbor

    (5/29/2012) Seventy years after the United States was launched into World War II, veteran reporter Dan Rather returns to Hawaii to explore the day that will live in infamy and how its meaning has changed with the passage of time.

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    • 1 Hour 42 Minutes

    (5/29/2012) Seventy years after the United States was launched into World War II, veteran reporter Dan Rather returns to Hawaii to explore the day that will live in infamy and how its meaning has changed with the passage of time.

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    • 1 Hour 42 Minutes
    • EPISODE 17

    Divided They Stand

    (6/5/2012) An in-depth conversation about our dysfunctional, overly partisan Congress with authors Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein. The two have recently written the book, “It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism.”

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    • 48 Minutes

    (6/5/2012) An in-depth conversation about our dysfunctional, overly partisan Congress with authors Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein. The two have recently written the book, “It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism.”

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    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 18

    Running for Their Lives

    (6/12/2012) With the violence escalating, hundreds of families are escaping the hell that is Syria every day. We have first access to crowded camps on the Jordanian border where families show us the horrors of what's happening just a few miles from their safe haven. Also, middle east expert Fouad Ajami.

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    • 51 Minutes

    (6/12/2012) With the violence escalating, hundreds of families are escaping the hell that is Syria every day. We have first access to crowded camps on the Jordanian border where families show us the horrors of what's happening just a few miles from their safe haven. Also, middle east expert Fouad Ajami.

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    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 19

    Inside the Revolution

    (7/3/2012) Journalist David Enders spent three jolting weeks in June witnessing first hand the violence raging all across Syria. Enders is one of the few Western journalists to gain extensive access to Syrian rebels. His contacts allowed him unprecedented freedom to travel to several Syrian towns and report what the Assad regime doesn’t want you to see. Enders shares his experiences as well as his footage for an exclusive look at what is really happening inside Syria.

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    • 47 Minutes

    (7/3/2012) Journalist David Enders spent three jolting weeks in June witnessing first hand the violence raging all across Syria. Enders is one of the few Western journalists to gain extensive access to Syrian rebels. His contacts allowed him unprecedented freedom to travel to several Syrian towns and report what the Assad regime doesn’t want you to see. Enders shares his experiences as well as his footage for an exclusive look at what is really happening inside Syria.

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    • 47 Minutes
    • EPISODE 20

    Red Gold

    (7/10/2012) There is a storm brewing in Alaska. While two mining companies have been developing plans to build what could be the world's largest open-pit copper mine in the head waters of Bristol Bay, environmentalists, local commercial fishermen and lodge owners have come together to try and stop them in order to protect the massive salmon population living in those waters. For this special live broadcast, we are joined by John Shively, CEO of Pebble Partnership; Bob Reiss, Author of "The Eskimo and the Oil Man," and renowned Chef Rick Moonen, Chef and Owner of RM Seafood in Las Vegas.

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    • 45 Minutes

    (7/10/2012) There is a storm brewing in Alaska. While two mining companies have been developing plans to build what could be the world's largest open-pit copper mine in the head waters of Bristol Bay, environmentalists, local commercial fishermen and lodge owners have come together to try and stop them in order to protect the massive salmon population living in those waters. For this special live broadcast, we are joined by John Shively, CEO of Pebble Partnership; Bob Reiss, Author of "The Eskimo and the Oil Man," and renowned Chef Rick Moonen, Chef and Owner of RM Seafood in Las Vegas.

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    • 45 Minutes
    • EPISODE 21

    It's a Southern Thing

    (7/17/2012) More than 30 years into the AIDS epidemic in America, the popular image of the disease is badly out of step with reality. Today, the place in the U.S. where the HIV virus is hitting hardest is the South, which has over half of all new HIV cases in the country. The South also accounts for 53% of the HIV-related deaths in the entire country – meaning someone in Mississippi is 50% more likely to die of AIDS than someone in New York. And even though this part of our country is being so highly affected by the disease, the South still receives significantly less federal funding to fight HIV than any other region of the country. Our months-long investigation looks the reasons for this explosion of AIDS, including the shocking lack of education about the disease and the continuing social stigma of AIDS, forcing the patients into almost total secrecy. Also, an update on the fate of Blitz USA, a company that makes plastic gas containers that are alleged to explode.

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    • 46 Minutes

    (7/17/2012) More than 30 years into the AIDS epidemic in America, the popular image of the disease is badly out of step with reality. Today, the place in the U.S. where the HIV virus is hitting hardest is the South, which has over half of all new HIV cases in the country. The South also accounts for 53% of the HIV-related deaths in the entire country – meaning someone in Mississippi is 50% more likely to die of AIDS than someone in New York. And even though this part of our country is being so highly affected by the disease, the South still receives significantly less federal funding to fight HIV than any other region of the country. Our months-long investigation looks the reasons for this explosion of AIDS, including the shocking lack of education about the disease and the continuing social stigma of AIDS, forcing the patients into almost total secrecy. Also, an update on the fate of Blitz USA, a company that makes plastic gas containers that are alleged to explode.

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    • 46 Minutes
    • EPISODE 22

    In the Running

    (7/24/2012) On the eve of the Olympics, we take viewers to Kenya to uncover the secrets of how athletes from a third world country on the world’s poorest continent have all but taken over marathon running, one of the most popular sports in the world. Iten is a tiny Kenyan farming village where many live without running water, there are no stoplights and a sign of success is owning one’s own cow. But this town also happens to be home to more world-class runners than any other place on earth, including all six of Kenya’s Olympic marathon team. And we’ll also meet an unlikely coach, a missionary from Ireland, who came to Kenya in the 1970s to teach geography, and ended up forever changing the sport of running.

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    • 45 Minutes

    (7/24/2012) On the eve of the Olympics, we take viewers to Kenya to uncover the secrets of how athletes from a third world country on the world’s poorest continent have all but taken over marathon running, one of the most popular sports in the world. Iten is a tiny Kenyan farming village where many live without running water, there are no stoplights and a sign of success is owning one’s own cow. But this town also happens to be home to more world-class runners than any other place on earth, including all six of Kenya’s Olympic marathon team. And we’ll also meet an unlikely coach, a missionary from Ireland, who came to Kenya in the 1970s to teach geography, and ended up forever changing the sport of running.

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    • 45 Minutes
    • EPISODE 23

    A Crack in the Ice

    (8/14/2012) We head 450 miles north of the Arctic Circle, where warming sea ice is rapidly receding and revealing a new series of opportunities and challenges.
    For nearly 30 years, NASA satellite images have told the story: the ice cap that sits atop the world is shrinking rapidly. The melting ice has created an open water route that could shave thousands of miles off traditional shipping routes from Europe to Asia. Global warming is upsetting a delicate environmental balance with unpredictable results, but it is also revealing resources that had been locked beneath the ice. Geologists estimate that 25 percent of the world's untapped oil and natural gas reserves lie in the Arctic. So the Arctic is shaking off its reputation as the end of the world. After all, the earth is a globe, and the "end of the world" has always been a matter of perspective.

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    • 48 Minutes

    (8/14/2012) We head 450 miles north of the Arctic Circle, where warming sea ice is rapidly receding and revealing a new series of opportunities and challenges.
    For nearly 30 years, NASA satellite images have told the story: the ice cap that sits atop the world is shrinking rapidly. The melting ice has created an open water route that could shave thousands of miles off traditional shipping routes from Europe to Asia. Global warming is upsetting a delicate environmental balance with unpredictable results, but it is also revealing resources that had been locked beneath the ice. Geologists estimate that 25 percent of the world's untapped oil and natural gas reserves lie in the Arctic. So the Arctic is shaking off its reputation as the end of the world. After all, the earth is a globe, and the "end of the world" has always been a matter of perspective.

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    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 24

    Adopted or Abducted?

    (8/21/2012) An update to our original program with new information into claims by women that they were forced to put their babies up for adoption, many with the knowledge and support of Catholic Charities. Our six month investigation spans from Australia to Canada and the U.S. -- and looks at the widespread and shocking practice of babies born out of wedlock, even at the height of the sexual revolution of the 1960’s and 70’s, forcefully put up for adoption.

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    • 48 Minutes

    (8/21/2012) An update to our original program with new information into claims by women that they were forced to put their babies up for adoption, many with the knowledge and support of Catholic Charities. Our six month investigation spans from Australia to Canada and the U.S. -- and looks at the widespread and shocking practice of babies born out of wedlock, even at the height of the sexual revolution of the 1960’s and 70’s, forcefully put up for adoption.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 25

    A Fighting Chance

    (8/28/2012) Once an impressive high school athlete in Virginia, Daniel Rodriguez had big dreams of playing college football, but a detour in his life sent him to serve as a U.S. Infantryman in Afghanistan. However, his gridiron dreams never died. The combat loss of his best friend, Pfc. Kevin Thomson, only strengthened Rodriguez’s resolve to bring to reality the dreams he and Thomson talked about in war. Rodriguez promised Thomson that he would pursue football if he ever made it home – and he’s done it – find out where Rodriguez will be playing Division One football.
    Also, a follow up report to our investigation into counterfeit prescription drugs and how they almost infiltrated the U.S. market.

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    • 48 Minutes

    (8/28/2012) Once an impressive high school athlete in Virginia, Daniel Rodriguez had big dreams of playing college football, but a detour in his life sent him to serve as a U.S. Infantryman in Afghanistan. However, his gridiron dreams never died. The combat loss of his best friend, Pfc. Kevin Thomson, only strengthened Rodriguez’s resolve to bring to reality the dreams he and Thomson talked about in war. Rodriguez promised Thomson that he would pursue football if he ever made it home – and he’s done it – find out where Rodriguez will be playing Division One football.
    Also, a follow up report to our investigation into counterfeit prescription drugs and how they almost infiltrated the U.S. market.

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    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 26

    Music 2.0

    (9/4/2012) Making music but not making money may sound like the lyrics to a country song, but for some musicians, it's the new reality. Many say that it has never been so difficult. The digital revolution that began a decade ago with the iPod has changed the music industry forever. How can this critical piece of the American entertainment business survive when so much of its content is given away? Joining us for this special broadcast from Austin City Limits Live at the Moody Theatre are music legend Willie Nelson and new comer Kat Edmonson – each weighing in on the changes in the business, while also taking the stage to do what they do best, perform live music. Music mogul Marc Geiger, Bob Boilen from NPR's “All Songs Considered” and University of Texas music professor Gary Powell will also be on hand for the discussion.

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    • 1 Hour 10 Minutes

    (9/4/2012) Making music but not making money may sound like the lyrics to a country song, but for some musicians, it's the new reality. Many say that it has never been so difficult. The digital revolution that began a decade ago with the iPod has changed the music industry forever. How can this critical piece of the American entertainment business survive when so much of its content is given away? Joining us for this special broadcast from Austin City Limits Live at the Moody Theatre are music legend Willie Nelson and new comer Kat Edmonson – each weighing in on the changes in the business, while also taking the stage to do what they do best, perform live music. Music mogul Marc Geiger, Bob Boilen from NPR's “All Songs Considered” and University of Texas music professor Gary Powell will also be on hand for the discussion.

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    • 1 Hour 10 Minutes
    • EPISODE 27

    College On the Cheap

    (9/18/2012) A college degree is the key to realizing the American dream, well worth the financial sacrifice -- at least, that's what we've always believed. But the cost of going to college has never been so high and the value of that diploma has never been more in doubt. We profile several entrepreneurs who are trying to make college education more affordable, accessible…and relevant to today's job market.
    Also, what started out as the innocent practice of releasing an unwanted house pet into the wild is now threatening to destroy the already fragile ecosystem of one of the nation’s most majestic national parks, Everglades National Park. The Burmese Python has grown into an infestation that numbers an estimated 100,000 -- and in some cases, these pythons are depleting the park of indigenous species to the tune of 90% or more.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes

    (9/18/2012) A college degree is the key to realizing the American dream, well worth the financial sacrifice -- at least, that's what we've always believed. But the cost of going to college has never been so high and the value of that diploma has never been more in doubt. We profile several entrepreneurs who are trying to make college education more affordable, accessible…and relevant to today's job market.
    Also, what started out as the innocent practice of releasing an unwanted house pet into the wild is now threatening to destroy the already fragile ecosystem of one of the nation’s most majestic national parks, Everglades National Park. The Burmese Python has grown into an infestation that numbers an estimated 100,000 -- and in some cases, these pythons are depleting the park of indigenous species to the tune of 90% or more.

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    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 28

    El Presidente

    (9/25/2012) The nation of Colombia has accepted billions of dollars in U.S. aid for fighting drug traffickers and eradicating drug crops. But in a candid interview, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos makes it clear that he’s not afraid to challenge longstanding U.S. drug-fighting dogma – telling us it’s time to rethink the entire effort – and at least consider decriminalizing drugs. Also, we travel to the jungles of South America, where countries like Suriname are turning to gold mining to increase their bottom line. But mercury, one of the main ingredients used in the mining process, is also incredibly dangerous and it’s causing irreversible environmental damage and serious health issues.

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    • 47 Minutes

    (9/25/2012) The nation of Colombia has accepted billions of dollars in U.S. aid for fighting drug traffickers and eradicating drug crops. But in a candid interview, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos makes it clear that he’s not afraid to challenge longstanding U.S. drug-fighting dogma – telling us it’s time to rethink the entire effort – and at least consider decriminalizing drugs. Also, we travel to the jungles of South America, where countries like Suriname are turning to gold mining to increase their bottom line. But mercury, one of the main ingredients used in the mining process, is also incredibly dangerous and it’s causing irreversible environmental damage and serious health issues.

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    • 47 Minutes
    • EPISODE 29

    As Ohio Goes...

    (10/2/2012) In 2008, Ohio had unprecedented hours for early voting, including weekends and three days prior to the election. This change drew a record number of voters to the polls, especially in the African American community. But in 2011, the Ohio legislature and Republican Secretary of State curtailed early voting, cutting the number of early voting days -- and last month uniform hours were mandated statewide, thus eliminating weekend voting altogether, except for military voters. The situation remains a flashpoint of debate, with many in the Democratic Party seeing this move by state Republicans as an attempt to suppress votes. Also, we speak with Republican strategist Mike Murphy who will elaborate on the situation in Ohio and give his latest assessment of Mitt Romney’s chances in November.

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    • 48 Minutes

    (10/2/2012) In 2008, Ohio had unprecedented hours for early voting, including weekends and three days prior to the election. This change drew a record number of voters to the polls, especially in the African American community. But in 2011, the Ohio legislature and Republican Secretary of State curtailed early voting, cutting the number of early voting days -- and last month uniform hours were mandated statewide, thus eliminating weekend voting altogether, except for military voters. The situation remains a flashpoint of debate, with many in the Democratic Party seeing this move by state Republicans as an attempt to suppress votes. Also, we speak with Republican strategist Mike Murphy who will elaborate on the situation in Ohio and give his latest assessment of Mitt Romney’s chances in November.

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    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 30

    Real Fast Rail

    (10/16/2012) The promise of high speed trains across the United States is falling off the tracks. But in many countries super fast trains are full speed ahead. We visit Spain, which has one of the world’s best high speed rail systems in the world to see how it could one day look in the U.S. We also head out to Madera, California, where history is about to be made. In just a few months, construction will begin on the U.S.’s first true high-speed rail line. Join us for a real fast ride.

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    • 48 Minutes

    (10/16/2012) The promise of high speed trains across the United States is falling off the tracks. But in many countries super fast trains are full speed ahead. We visit Spain, which has one of the world’s best high speed rail systems in the world to see how it could one day look in the U.S. We also head out to Madera, California, where history is about to be made. In just a few months, construction will begin on the U.S.’s first true high-speed rail line. Join us for a real fast ride.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 31

    Gaddafi's Last Day

    (10/23/2012) We report from Libya, a country that is back in the headlines but from which there has been precious little reporting on the ground. The death of U.S. ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans has become a key point in the presidential election. But what about the country itself? The reality is, as with most matters of foreign affairs, there are no easy answers.
    We were given extraordinary access to what has happened in Libya in the past twelve months. It was a year ago, October 2011, when Moammar Gadaffi was executed by his countrymen. But it wouldn’t have happened without help from the U.S. Of all the countries that have seen so-called “Arab Spring” uprisings, Libya is the only one where the west openly intervened. There was great hope that Libya would quickly become a symbol of a new order in the Arab world, but a year later all the complexity and contradictions of the country can be found in the charred ruins of the American consulate in Benghazi.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes

    (10/23/2012) We report from Libya, a country that is back in the headlines but from which there has been precious little reporting on the ground. The death of U.S. ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans has become a key point in the presidential election. But what about the country itself? The reality is, as with most matters of foreign affairs, there are no easy answers.
    We were given extraordinary access to what has happened in Libya in the past twelve months. It was a year ago, October 2011, when Moammar Gadaffi was executed by his countrymen. But it wouldn’t have happened without help from the U.S. Of all the countries that have seen so-called “Arab Spring” uprisings, Libya is the only one where the west openly intervened. There was great hope that Libya would quickly become a symbol of a new order in the Arab world, but a year later all the complexity and contradictions of the country can be found in the charred ruins of the American consulate in Benghazi.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 32

    How Sweet It Was

    (10/30/2012) Since 2000, this country has averaged 17 factory closings a day-- that’s a net loss of nearly 1300 American manufacturing jobs every single day. These closings are caused by the inequities of a new global economy and certainly not helped by government policies that may be helping America’s companies compete, but in the process, ravaging America’s middle class. In this hour, we take a look at one of America’s most iconic companies -- The Hershey Company. We’ll see why in even the sweetest success stories, today’s reality of jobs moving to Mexico and accusations of unfair labor practices, makes for a painful new bottom line in the place that once embodied the working man’s American dream.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes

    (10/30/2012) Since 2000, this country has averaged 17 factory closings a day-- that’s a net loss of nearly 1300 American manufacturing jobs every single day. These closings are caused by the inequities of a new global economy and certainly not helped by government policies that may be helping America’s companies compete, but in the process, ravaging America’s middle class. In this hour, we take a look at one of America’s most iconic companies -- The Hershey Company. We’ll see why in even the sweetest success stories, today’s reality of jobs moving to Mexico and accusations of unfair labor practices, makes for a painful new bottom line in the place that once embodied the working man’s American dream.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 33

    Pulling Rank

    (11/13/2012) We sit down with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, on the future of the U.S. military and the concerns of veterans. Also, on December 7, 1941, Glenn Lane was a 23 year-old radio man assigned to the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Many of his shipmates died on that “date that will live in infamy,” but Lane made it out alive, passing away recently at the age of 93. A military provision allows for those who survived the attack on the Arizona to have their ashes interred on the ship so they may join their fallen comrades. We were a given a special invitation by Lane’s family to document this rare military burial at the sunken battleship. And, a look at our newest veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan.

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    • 48 Minutes

    (11/13/2012) We sit down with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, on the future of the U.S. military and the concerns of veterans. Also, on December 7, 1941, Glenn Lane was a 23 year-old radio man assigned to the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Many of his shipmates died on that “date that will live in infamy,” but Lane made it out alive, passing away recently at the age of 93. A military provision allows for those who survived the attack on the Arizona to have their ashes interred on the ship so they may join their fallen comrades. We were a given a special invitation by Lane’s family to document this rare military burial at the sunken battleship. And, a look at our newest veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 34

    In The Dark

    (11/20/2012) In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy a lot of anger around New York and especially New Jersey, has focused on the time it has taken to get the power back into millions of homes and businesses. We investigate one power company in New Jersey that has come under heavy criticism – and take a look at whether an era of deregulation might have left power companies and regulators across the country more focused on cutting costs and maximizing profits than keeping the lights on.
    Also, a look at the skyrocketing rates of HIV infections across the southern U.S., where more than 50% of new infections are reported, by far the highest area in the nation. But even though this part of our country is being so highly affected by the disease, the South still receives significantly less federal funding to fight HIV than any other region of the country.
    And, an update on our story about the Hershey Company. .

    • CC
    • 47 Minutes

    (11/20/2012) In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy a lot of anger around New York and especially New Jersey, has focused on the time it has taken to get the power back into millions of homes and businesses. We investigate one power company in New Jersey that has come under heavy criticism – and take a look at whether an era of deregulation might have left power companies and regulators across the country more focused on cutting costs and maximizing profits than keeping the lights on.
    Also, a look at the skyrocketing rates of HIV infections across the southern U.S., where more than 50% of new infections are reported, by far the highest area in the nation. But even though this part of our country is being so highly affected by the disease, the South still receives significantly less federal funding to fight HIV than any other region of the country.
    And, an update on our story about the Hershey Company. .

    • CC
    • 47 Minutes
    • EPISODE 35

    Best of Dan Rather Reports 2012

    (12/18/2012) A look back at some of our more memorable stories this year from around the world.

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    • 47 Minutes

    (12/18/2012) A look back at some of our more memorable stories this year from around the world.

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    • 47 Minutes
© 2012 HDNet LLC

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