Description

In 800 B.C., the poet Homer wrote down the stories of the great heroes of Ancient Greece, tales such as ‘Orpheus and Eurydice’ and ‘Daedalus and Icarus’. In an exciting sequel to The Storyteller, Michael Gambon acts as the narrator who, from the ruined depths of the Labyrinth of Knossos, brings the Greek legends and myths to life.

    • $4.99

Description

In 800 B.C., the poet Homer wrote down the stories of the great heroes of Ancient Greece, tales such as ‘Orpheus and Eurydice’ and ‘Daedalus and Icarus’. In an exciting sequel to The Storyteller, Michael Gambon acts as the narrator who, from the ruined depths of the Labyrinth of Knossos, brings the Greek legends and myths to life.

    • EPISODE 1

    Perseus & the Gorgon

    When Acrisius, The King of Argos is told by an oracle that his daughter Danae will have a son who will one day kill him, he tries to avoid the prophecy by keeping her locked up. However, Danae had caught Zeus’ eye and he visited her, appearing as a shower of gold. and impregnated her. When Acrisius learns he has a grandson, Perseus, he doesn’t believe Danae’s story about Zeus, and thinks his brother is the culprit. Nervous about actually putting her to death, he casts Danae and Perseus out to sea in a wooden chest. They wash up on the island of Seriphos, where they make their home. The evil King of Seriphos falls in love with Danae and devises a plan to get rid of her disapproving son Perseus. He holds a great feast, to which all the young men of the island arrive bearing rich gifts — except for penniless Perseus, who is humiliated and jeered at for arriving empty-handed. He retaliates by announcing he will present the King with the rarest gift of all — the head of the Gorgon Medusa, who is so terrifying, one look from her can turn a man to stone. Athene and Hermes appear to Perseus and present him with a highly-polished bronze shield and a sharp sword. They then send him to the three Graeae women, who share just one eye and one tooth between them. Perseus steals their eye, and refuses to return it until they direct him to the three beautiful Stygian nymphs, who give him winged sandals and a cap of invisibility. Then Atlas, the sad giant who wearily holds up the sky, tells Perseus where the Gorgons live. Perseus discovers the three Gorgon sisters asleep, surrounded by the petrified remains of men and animals. As instructed by Athene, Perseus looks only at the reflection of the serpent-haired Medusa in the polished shield, not at her directly, and strikes off her head. On his way home, Perseus visits Atlas again and puts him out of his agony by showing him the Gorgon’s face, thus turning him into a mountain. When he eventually arrives home, he turns the King to stone. With his mother and wife, Perseus heads back to Argos, but on the way stops off to enjoy some celebratory games at Larissa. During the games, Perseus throws a discus so hard, it kills an old man in the crowd. This man, it turns out, is his grandfather Acrisius, who had fled there to avoid the oracle’s prophecy when he heard that Perseus was on his way home.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes

    When Acrisius, The King of Argos is told by an oracle that his daughter Danae will have a son who will one day kill him, he tries to avoid the prophecy by keeping her locked up. However, Danae had caught Zeus’ eye and he visited her, appearing as a shower of gold. and impregnated her. When Acrisius learns he has a grandson, Perseus, he doesn’t believe Danae’s story about Zeus, and thinks his brother is the culprit. Nervous about actually putting her to death, he casts Danae and Perseus out to sea in a wooden chest. They wash up on the island of Seriphos, where they make their home. The evil King of Seriphos falls in love with Danae and devises a plan to get rid of her disapproving son Perseus. He holds a great feast, to which all the young men of the island arrive bearing rich gifts — except for penniless Perseus, who is humiliated and jeered at for arriving empty-handed. He retaliates by announcing he will present the King with the rarest gift of all — the head of the Gorgon Medusa, who is so terrifying, one look from her can turn a man to stone. Athene and Hermes appear to Perseus and present him with a highly-polished bronze shield and a sharp sword. They then send him to the three Graeae women, who share just one eye and one tooth between them. Perseus steals their eye, and refuses to return it until they direct him to the three beautiful Stygian nymphs, who give him winged sandals and a cap of invisibility. Then Atlas, the sad giant who wearily holds up the sky, tells Perseus where the Gorgons live. Perseus discovers the three Gorgon sisters asleep, surrounded by the petrified remains of men and animals. As instructed by Athene, Perseus looks only at the reflection of the serpent-haired Medusa in the polished shield, not at her directly, and strikes off her head. On his way home, Perseus visits Atlas again and puts him out of his agony by showing him the Gorgon’s face, thus turning him into a mountain. When he eventually arrives home, he turns the King to stone. With his mother and wife, Perseus heads back to Argos, but on the way stops off to enjoy some celebratory games at Larissa. During the games, Perseus throws a discus so hard, it kills an old man in the crowd. This man, it turns out, is his grandfather Acrisius, who had fled there to avoid the oracle’s prophecy when he heard that Perseus was on his way home.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes
    • EPISODE 2

    Orpheus & Eurydice

    Orpheus was the only mortal on whom Apollo had bestowed the gift of music — with his lyre he could enchant wild beasts and even move trees and rocks. A few years after his adventures as one of Jason’s Argonauts, Orpheus married Eurydice and settled down. Their happiness was short-lived though when Eurydice died from a snake bite. Heart-broken, Orpheus descended to the Underworld (the Land of the Dead) in a desperate attempt to try and fetch her back. First he met Charon, the old miser who ferried the dead across the River Styx, who uncharacteristically overlooked his usual fee when he heard Orpheus’ sweet music. Upon arrival in Hades’ realm, Orpheus pleaded with the King of the Underworld for the return of Eurydice, and as he started to play his lyre the savage heart of Hades began to melt a little. Hades was sufficiently moved to let Orpheus take Eurydice back to the upper world on the condition that he did not look behind him to check she was following until they were both safely back in the sunlight. Eurydice followed the sound of Orpheus’ lyre through the dark passages and across the Styx, but just as he emerged into the daylight he turned to see if she was still there, and lost her forever.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes

    Orpheus was the only mortal on whom Apollo had bestowed the gift of music — with his lyre he could enchant wild beasts and even move trees and rocks. A few years after his adventures as one of Jason’s Argonauts, Orpheus married Eurydice and settled down. Their happiness was short-lived though when Eurydice died from a snake bite. Heart-broken, Orpheus descended to the Underworld (the Land of the Dead) in a desperate attempt to try and fetch her back. First he met Charon, the old miser who ferried the dead across the River Styx, who uncharacteristically overlooked his usual fee when he heard Orpheus’ sweet music. Upon arrival in Hades’ realm, Orpheus pleaded with the King of the Underworld for the return of Eurydice, and as he started to play his lyre the savage heart of Hades began to melt a little. Hades was sufficiently moved to let Orpheus take Eurydice back to the upper world on the condition that he did not look behind him to check she was following until they were both safely back in the sunlight. Eurydice followed the sound of Orpheus’ lyre through the dark passages and across the Styx, but just as he emerged into the daylight he turned to see if she was still there, and lost her forever.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes
    • EPISODE 3

    Theseus & the Minotaur

    When King Aegeus of Athens visited Troezen, he bedded King Pittheus’ beautiful daughter, Aethra. The next day, Aegeus buried a sword and a pair of sandals under a huge rock, telling Aethra that if she bore him a son, she must send him to Athens only when he was strong enough to lift the stone. When Aethra gave birth to Theseus, King Pittheus spread the rumor that the father was Poseidon. At the age of 16, Theseus lifted the rock and was told the secret of his parentage. Setting off for Athens, he insisted on taking the dangerous coast road, determined to clear the way of all the bandits that terrorized the area. He killed them all. Although he arrived in Athens incognito, Medea soon guessed Theseus’ identity and because she had already provided Aegeus with an heir, plotted his death. She invited Theseus to a feast and gave him some poisoned wine but, just as the cup reached his lips, Aegeus recognized the sword he had left under the stone, and dashed the cup to the floor. Whilst Aegeus embraced his son, Medea quietly slipped away. Shortly afterwards, King Minos of Crete sent envoys to collect young girls and boys to feed the Minotaur — a monstrous half-man, half-bull creature. Learning that this happened every seven years, Theseus decided to put an end to it by volunteering to go to Crete and kill the beast. Reluctant to see him go, Aegeus gave Theseus a white sail which he was to hoist on his return, signalling his success and survival. Theseus’ unbowed manner soon earned him the hatred of King Minos — and the love of his daughter Ariadne. She promised to marry Theseus after he had successfully killed the Minotaur, and gave him a magic ball of thread. He tied one end to the doorway and let it roll, finding its own way to the center of the Labyrinth where the Minotaur lived. When Theseus emerged triumphant, having slain the Minotaur, he rescued Ariadne, boarded their ship and sailed back to Athens. Stopping off at Naxos, Theseus broke his promise of love towards Ariadne and set sail without her. In his obsession with the head of the Minotaur he forgot his promise to hoist the white sail. Aegeus, waiting for his son on the Acropolis believed the black sail meant Theseus was dead, and threw himself into the sea.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes

    When King Aegeus of Athens visited Troezen, he bedded King Pittheus’ beautiful daughter, Aethra. The next day, Aegeus buried a sword and a pair of sandals under a huge rock, telling Aethra that if she bore him a son, she must send him to Athens only when he was strong enough to lift the stone. When Aethra gave birth to Theseus, King Pittheus spread the rumor that the father was Poseidon. At the age of 16, Theseus lifted the rock and was told the secret of his parentage. Setting off for Athens, he insisted on taking the dangerous coast road, determined to clear the way of all the bandits that terrorized the area. He killed them all. Although he arrived in Athens incognito, Medea soon guessed Theseus’ identity and because she had already provided Aegeus with an heir, plotted his death. She invited Theseus to a feast and gave him some poisoned wine but, just as the cup reached his lips, Aegeus recognized the sword he had left under the stone, and dashed the cup to the floor. Whilst Aegeus embraced his son, Medea quietly slipped away. Shortly afterwards, King Minos of Crete sent envoys to collect young girls and boys to feed the Minotaur — a monstrous half-man, half-bull creature. Learning that this happened every seven years, Theseus decided to put an end to it by volunteering to go to Crete and kill the beast. Reluctant to see him go, Aegeus gave Theseus a white sail which he was to hoist on his return, signalling his success and survival. Theseus’ unbowed manner soon earned him the hatred of King Minos — and the love of his daughter Ariadne. She promised to marry Theseus after he had successfully killed the Minotaur, and gave him a magic ball of thread. He tied one end to the doorway and let it roll, finding its own way to the center of the Labyrinth where the Minotaur lived. When Theseus emerged triumphant, having slain the Minotaur, he rescued Ariadne, boarded their ship and sailed back to Athens. Stopping off at Naxos, Theseus broke his promise of love towards Ariadne and set sail without her. In his obsession with the head of the Minotaur he forgot his promise to hoist the white sail. Aegeus, waiting for his son on the Acropolis believed the black sail meant Theseus was dead, and threw himself into the sea.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes
    • EPISODE 4

    Daedalus & Icarus

    Daedalus was generally thought to be the most brilliant craftsman in Athens until one of his apprentices surpassed him. In a fight spurred by jealousy, Daedalus threw the apprentice off the Acropolis. His crime was discovered and he was banished from Athens. He sought refuge in Crete, where King Minos was delighted to welcome such a famous craftsman. He lived happily there for many years, and during that time, built the Labyrinth of Knossos, in which was placed the fearsome Minotaur – half man, half bull. Upon its completion, Daedalus swore on his life that no man would ever find his way out of it. However evil King Minos imprisoned Daedalus and his son, Icarus, in the prison so the secret of the Labyrinth is certain. Daedalus escaped and made wings of feathers fastened together with wax for himself and his son. Daedalus cautioned Icarus to go neither too high, not too low, and told him to follow closely. As they sped away over sea and land, fisherman and shepherds gazing upwards mistook them for gods. Icarus eventually disobeyed his father’s instructions and soared up, enjoying the lift of his great sweeping wings. He flew too high, however, and as the sun melted the wax that held his wings, he fell into the sea and drowned. Grief-stricken, Daedalus continued on to Sicily, where he remained in the employ of King Cocalus. King Minos wanted revenge and raised a fleet to search out Daedalus. With him he brought a triton shell, and wherever he went he promised a reward to anyone who could pass a linen thread through it — knowing that only Daedalus would be able to solve the problem. Sure enough, when he landed in Sicily, King Cocalus undertook to have it threaded and handed it over to Daedalus. He attached the thread to an ant and let it crawl through the spiral, coaxing it along with honey. When Cocalus claimed the reward, Minos demanded that Daedalus be handed over. Cocalus would have obliged, but his daughters were so fond of Daedalus, they fed boiling water through a secret pipe into King Minos’ bath, scalding him to death. Daedalus was finally free to continue life without having to keep looking over his shoulder, but constantly mourned his son.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes

    Daedalus was generally thought to be the most brilliant craftsman in Athens until one of his apprentices surpassed him. In a fight spurred by jealousy, Daedalus threw the apprentice off the Acropolis. His crime was discovered and he was banished from Athens. He sought refuge in Crete, where King Minos was delighted to welcome such a famous craftsman. He lived happily there for many years, and during that time, built the Labyrinth of Knossos, in which was placed the fearsome Minotaur – half man, half bull. Upon its completion, Daedalus swore on his life that no man would ever find his way out of it. However evil King Minos imprisoned Daedalus and his son, Icarus, in the prison so the secret of the Labyrinth is certain. Daedalus escaped and made wings of feathers fastened together with wax for himself and his son. Daedalus cautioned Icarus to go neither too high, not too low, and told him to follow closely. As they sped away over sea and land, fisherman and shepherds gazing upwards mistook them for gods. Icarus eventually disobeyed his father’s instructions and soared up, enjoying the lift of his great sweeping wings. He flew too high, however, and as the sun melted the wax that held his wings, he fell into the sea and drowned. Grief-stricken, Daedalus continued on to Sicily, where he remained in the employ of King Cocalus. King Minos wanted revenge and raised a fleet to search out Daedalus. With him he brought a triton shell, and wherever he went he promised a reward to anyone who could pass a linen thread through it — knowing that only Daedalus would be able to solve the problem. Sure enough, when he landed in Sicily, King Cocalus undertook to have it threaded and handed it over to Daedalus. He attached the thread to an ant and let it crawl through the spiral, coaxing it along with honey. When Cocalus claimed the reward, Minos demanded that Daedalus be handed over. Cocalus would have obliged, but his daughters were so fond of Daedalus, they fed boiling water through a secret pipe into King Minos’ bath, scalding him to death. Daedalus was finally free to continue life without having to keep looking over his shoulder, but constantly mourned his son.

    • HD
    • CC
    • 23 Minutes
© The Jim Henson Company, 1991

Viewers Also Bought

Top Sci-Fi & Fantasy Shows