Description

Host Dan Rather presents hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews, and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness, and guts in their reporting. The program will cover topics including, but not limited to, politics, the environment, the global economy, and international affairs and conflicts.

    • $29.99

Description

Host Dan Rather presents hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews, and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness, and guts in their reporting. The program will cover topics including, but not limited to, politics, the environment, the global economy, and international affairs and conflicts.

    • EPISODE 1

    Talking Text

    (1/5/2010) On Christmas day 2009, a young Nigerian tried to blow up a jetliner as it neared the Detroit airport. His story and the security issues at airports around the world have been well documented. But what about where the plot was hatched? According to authorities, it all started in Yemen -- a place it turns out, we need to know a lot more about. Also, we've been through a remarkable decade of technological change that has altered the way we live our lives in ways unimaginable 10 years ago. We sit down with a group of innovators to discuss where we've been and where we're going.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    (1/5/2010) On Christmas day 2009, a young Nigerian tried to blow up a jetliner as it neared the Detroit airport. His story and the security issues at airports around the world have been well documented. But what about where the plot was hatched? According to authorities, it all started in Yemen -- a place it turns out, we need to know a lot more about. Also, we've been through a remarkable decade of technological change that has altered the way we live our lives in ways unimaginable 10 years ago. We sit down with a group of innovators to discuss where we've been and where we're going.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 2

    Kidney Pirates

    (1/12/2010) There are now twenty-six million Americans with chronic kidney disease. The best chance of survival for the sickest of those is a transplant – but in the United States alone the waiting list numbers in the tens of thousands. There is such a shortage of available kidneys that approximately four thousand five hundred Americans die waiting each year. But some have found a way to jump the line. It's illegal, but it can be life saving. A kidney broker - a middleman of sorts – will find you a living kidney donor, a doctor and even a hospital – for a fee of course. Our probe into the illicit black market for human kidneys takes us from poor villages in Moldova to gleaming hospitals in the U.S. We trace a network of criminals across three continents to see how they have gotten rich recruiting, tempting and coercing the world's poor and desperate into selling a kidney.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (1/12/2010) There are now twenty-six million Americans with chronic kidney disease. The best chance of survival for the sickest of those is a transplant – but in the United States alone the waiting list numbers in the tens of thousands. There is such a shortage of available kidneys that approximately four thousand five hundred Americans die waiting each year. But some have found a way to jump the line. It's illegal, but it can be life saving. A kidney broker - a middleman of sorts – will find you a living kidney donor, a doctor and even a hospital – for a fee of course. Our probe into the illicit black market for human kidneys takes us from poor villages in Moldova to gleaming hospitals in the U.S. We trace a network of criminals across three continents to see how they have gotten rich recruiting, tempting and coercing the world's poor and desperate into selling a kidney.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 3

    Paging Doctor Fraud

    (1/19/2010) Medicare has been a lifesaver for millions of Americans. It's also been credited with keeping health care costs down, but with billions of dollars in payments going out every year, there's room for fraud. It's not too strong to say that Medicare is being pillaged and plundered -- and cracking down on the problem has become a top priority for the Obama Administration. We examine how the Office of Inspector General is combating the fraud, and take an exclusive behind-the-scenes trip with a Strike Force team to Detroit to break up a Medicare crime ring there. Also, after 9/11, Congress called for the use of advanced technology to prevent airplane passengers from bringing explosives on board. Better technology has been available for years, yet 10 years after the terrorist attacks, metal detectors, useless for detecting bombs, are still the last line of defense. We examine the battle over whole body scanners—a technology that can peek under your clothes. And, an American diplomat who's spent 30 years in Haiti talks about the future of the island nation.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    (1/19/2010) Medicare has been a lifesaver for millions of Americans. It's also been credited with keeping health care costs down, but with billions of dollars in payments going out every year, there's room for fraud. It's not too strong to say that Medicare is being pillaged and plundered -- and cracking down on the problem has become a top priority for the Obama Administration. We examine how the Office of Inspector General is combating the fraud, and take an exclusive behind-the-scenes trip with a Strike Force team to Detroit to break up a Medicare crime ring there. Also, after 9/11, Congress called for the use of advanced technology to prevent airplane passengers from bringing explosives on board. Better technology has been available for years, yet 10 years after the terrorist attacks, metal detectors, useless for detecting bombs, are still the last line of defense. We examine the battle over whole body scanners—a technology that can peek under your clothes. And, an American diplomat who's spent 30 years in Haiti talks about the future of the island nation.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 4

    Taking A Hit

    (1/26/2010) This hour long investigation takes us back to the playing field for a follow-up look to our last report on the danger of concussions. And it's a whole new game. Now talk of concussions can be heard everywhere from the halls of Congress, to NFL headquarters, to the sidelines of youth sports. Awareness is up, but has anything really changed?

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes

    (1/26/2010) This hour long investigation takes us back to the playing field for a follow-up look to our last report on the danger of concussions. And it's a whole new game. Now talk of concussions can be heard everywhere from the halls of Congress, to NFL headquarters, to the sidelines of youth sports. Awareness is up, but has anything really changed?

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes
    • EPISODE 5

    Snapshot

    (2/9/2010) America's unemployment rate has soared during the economic recession. We travel to six places around the country-- Washington, DC, Tennessee, North Carolina, California, Illinois, and Ohio to see how people are coping.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (2/9/2010) America's unemployment rate has soared during the economic recession. We travel to six places around the country-- Washington, DC, Tennessee, North Carolina, California, Illinois, and Ohio to see how people are coping.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 6

    The Prison At Pecos

    (2/16/2010) Taxpayers have spent 2.2 billion dollars on private prison contracts within the last four years alone. But despite reaping huge profits from taxpayers, little is known about what happens inside private prisons because they are exempt from The Freedom of Information Act and accountable to no one – sometimes with deadly consequences.

    Also, Haiti: as you’ve never seen it. Independent pilots volunteering their time and aircraft to bring relief to remote areas of this earthquake devastated country.

    And the most famous intersection in America, Times Square, gets a make-over. Dan Rather Reports steps out into our own backyard to see visionary and the Commissioner of NYC’s Department of Transportation, Janette Sadik-Khan’s Time’s Square experiment that turned busy New York City streets into permanent pedestrian plazas.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (2/16/2010) Taxpayers have spent 2.2 billion dollars on private prison contracts within the last four years alone. But despite reaping huge profits from taxpayers, little is known about what happens inside private prisons because they are exempt from The Freedom of Information Act and accountable to no one – sometimes with deadly consequences.

    Also, Haiti: as you’ve never seen it. Independent pilots volunteering their time and aircraft to bring relief to remote areas of this earthquake devastated country.

    And the most famous intersection in America, Times Square, gets a make-over. Dan Rather Reports steps out into our own backyard to see visionary and the Commissioner of NYC’s Department of Transportation, Janette Sadik-Khan’s Time’s Square experiment that turned busy New York City streets into permanent pedestrian plazas.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 7

    Aftershock

    (2/23/2010) A month after the disastrous earthquake in Haiti; life goes on – as best it can. We spend time with Haitians of all stripes as they try to pick up the pieces and get back to a life of normalcy; we follow their search for shelter, food and jobs. With two high-definition cameras; up in the air and down on the ground, we gather some stunning footage of Port-au-Prince, where birds-eye views of quilts of tent camps contrast heartbreaking scenes of the life inside them. Dan Rather Reports was also given unique and candid access to General P.K. Keen, in charge of the U.S. military effort in Haiti. Finally, on this side of the ocean, we go to a bittersweet look at one Haitian family's story of survival, compassion and struggle as 17 family members, who managed to escape the tragedy, do their best to live together under one roof in Florida.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (2/23/2010) A month after the disastrous earthquake in Haiti; life goes on – as best it can. We spend time with Haitians of all stripes as they try to pick up the pieces and get back to a life of normalcy; we follow their search for shelter, food and jobs. With two high-definition cameras; up in the air and down on the ground, we gather some stunning footage of Port-au-Prince, where birds-eye views of quilts of tent camps contrast heartbreaking scenes of the life inside them. Dan Rather Reports was also given unique and candid access to General P.K. Keen, in charge of the U.S. military effort in Haiti. Finally, on this side of the ocean, we go to a bittersweet look at one Haitian family's story of survival, compassion and struggle as 17 family members, who managed to escape the tragedy, do their best to live together under one roof in Florida.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 8

    Women And War

    (3/2/2010) Can Women Stop War? A round table discussion with influential women from around the world on the power of women in developing countries and in regions of conflict.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    (3/2/2010) Can Women Stop War? A round table discussion with influential women from around the world on the power of women in developing countries and in regions of conflict.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 9

    The Price Of An Afghan Bride

    (3/9/2010) A portrait of a young, talented Afghan woman who's being sold for marriage against her will and decides to risk her life by speaking exclusively to us. The story is set against a backdrop of what life is like for most Afghan women in the areas of education, childbirth and domestic violence. A highlight is unique footage inside a maternity ward, where wives of Taliban fighters unveil and allow themselves to be interviewed in front of our cameras. We also speak with an Afghan women's activist, who was elected to parliament but thrown out for speaking up about atrocities against women. And, as the American war effort expands in the Afghan south, we travel to the heart of the Taliban insurgency - rural Kandahar - and spends weeks with the soldiers of the US Army’s Charlie Co. 1st Battalion 12th Infantry Regiment as they fight to hold the line against Taliban fighters while waiting for the troops promised in President Obama’s second escalation of the war.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes

    (3/9/2010) A portrait of a young, talented Afghan woman who's being sold for marriage against her will and decides to risk her life by speaking exclusively to us. The story is set against a backdrop of what life is like for most Afghan women in the areas of education, childbirth and domestic violence. A highlight is unique footage inside a maternity ward, where wives of Taliban fighters unveil and allow themselves to be interviewed in front of our cameras. We also speak with an Afghan women's activist, who was elected to parliament but thrown out for speaking up about atrocities against women. And, as the American war effort expands in the Afghan south, we travel to the heart of the Taliban insurgency - rural Kandahar - and spends weeks with the soldiers of the US Army’s Charlie Co. 1st Battalion 12th Infantry Regiment as they fight to hold the line against Taliban fighters while waiting for the troops promised in President Obama’s second escalation of the war.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes
    • EPISODE 10

    Over And Out

    (3/23/2010) U.S. forces in Iraq are preparing to withdraw for the final time. We visit one of the first American bases to shut down, and follow one of the thousands of convoys carrying vehicles and equipment out of Iraq, and south to Kuwait.

    It’s been 16 years since Rwanda was torn apart by savagery of an unimaginable scale. In 100 days of violence an estimated 800 thousand were slaughtered – most killed by their neighbors. Since then, the Rwandan government has made a bet that is unusual for Africa, and in many ways for the rest of the world. The country's future is being largely rested on the empowerment of women.

    It has been more than two years since the largest financial meltdown since the Great Depression. Yet, we are only in the early stages of any reform of the American banking system. But before we can move forward we must understand how we got into this mess in the first place. We talk with Charles Gasparino, journalist and author, about his critically acclaimed, new book The Sellout.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    (3/23/2010) U.S. forces in Iraq are preparing to withdraw for the final time. We visit one of the first American bases to shut down, and follow one of the thousands of convoys carrying vehicles and equipment out of Iraq, and south to Kuwait.

    It’s been 16 years since Rwanda was torn apart by savagery of an unimaginable scale. In 100 days of violence an estimated 800 thousand were slaughtered – most killed by their neighbors. Since then, the Rwandan government has made a bet that is unusual for Africa, and in many ways for the rest of the world. The country's future is being largely rested on the empowerment of women.

    It has been more than two years since the largest financial meltdown since the Great Depression. Yet, we are only in the early stages of any reform of the American banking system. But before we can move forward we must understand how we got into this mess in the first place. We talk with Charles Gasparino, journalist and author, about his critically acclaimed, new book The Sellout.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 11

    Not If But When

    (3/30/2010) A scientist is trying to bring attention to his findings which show that Port-au-Prince is likely to be hit by another earthquake sooner rather than later -- raising questions about where to rebuild Haiti's capital city.

    Faith Coleman, a nurse practitioner, is one of the millions of Americans without health insurance. Six years ago, she spent $35,000 in cash in a battle with kidney cancer. After surviving her illness, she decided she needed to give back ... so she began a bold experiment to provide free health care to any uninsured member of her community who falls below the poverty line.

    The annual report by The Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism on the State of the Media reveals that most of newspapers' recent financial problems have nothing to do with the recession. The culprit is the internet and the convenience it creates.


    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (3/30/2010) A scientist is trying to bring attention to his findings which show that Port-au-Prince is likely to be hit by another earthquake sooner rather than later -- raising questions about where to rebuild Haiti's capital city.

    Faith Coleman, a nurse practitioner, is one of the millions of Americans without health insurance. Six years ago, she spent $35,000 in cash in a battle with kidney cancer. After surviving her illness, she decided she needed to give back ... so she began a bold experiment to provide free health care to any uninsured member of her community who falls below the poverty line.

    The annual report by The Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism on the State of the Media reveals that most of newspapers' recent financial problems have nothing to do with the recession. The culprit is the internet and the convenience it creates.


    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 12

    The Big O

    (4/6/2010) Dan Rather Reports travels to Baghdad for a profile of four-star General Raymond Odierno, the chief U.S. military commander in Iraq, as he works to define a role for the Army in the final 20 months of America’s occupation. He talks about his experiences since the 2003 invasion, the difficult demands made of troops under his command, and his views on the future of Iraq. Also a report from the U.S. military's Middle East transit hub, Kuwait.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (4/6/2010) Dan Rather Reports travels to Baghdad for a profile of four-star General Raymond Odierno, the chief U.S. military commander in Iraq, as he works to define a role for the Army in the final 20 months of America’s occupation. He talks about his experiences since the 2003 invasion, the difficult demands made of troops under his command, and his views on the future of Iraq. Also a report from the U.S. military's Middle East transit hub, Kuwait.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 13

    Fracking Gas

    (4/13/2010) It's being called America's new energy frontier. Technological advances in drilling for natural gas have opened up vast new reserves, in shale rock. Enough gas, some estimates say, to last the U.S. 100 years. We look at what the technology is, how it works and the effect it may have on world politics. Also, families in small Wyoming town are getting sick. They believe their well water has been contaminated by the chemicals used to hydraulically fracture, or frack, gas wells on their property. The EPA is testing to see if they might be right.

    And a potentially game-changing update on a story we have been following - the danger of repeated concussions, particularly in sports like football. One woman speaks for her husband who cannot. She's taking a claim that her husband's dementia was caused by concussions during his NFL career to court. And if she wins the implications for the NFL could be huge.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (4/13/2010) It's being called America's new energy frontier. Technological advances in drilling for natural gas have opened up vast new reserves, in shale rock. Enough gas, some estimates say, to last the U.S. 100 years. We look at what the technology is, how it works and the effect it may have on world politics. Also, families in small Wyoming town are getting sick. They believe their well water has been contaminated by the chemicals used to hydraulically fracture, or frack, gas wells on their property. The EPA is testing to see if they might be right.

    And a potentially game-changing update on a story we have been following - the danger of repeated concussions, particularly in sports like football. One woman speaks for her husband who cannot. She's taking a claim that her husband's dementia was caused by concussions during his NFL career to court. And if she wins the implications for the NFL could be huge.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 14

    Mud Flap

    (4/20/2010) The bayous of Louisiana are an enchanting brew of water, land, plants and animals, but this distinctive part of America is disappearing quickly. With the mighty Mississippi bottled up behind man-made levees, the marshes that protect the bayous are no longer being replenished with the river mud that has sustained them for centuries. The Gulf of Mexico is encroaching, washing away wetlands, killing the bayous with salt water and putting an entire way of life at risk.

    Also, the story of a 12-year-old Haitian girl who is one of the few Haitians allowed into the U.S. for medical reasons. Through an unlikely series of circumstances, she was air-lifted from Haiti and flown to Florida, where she received specialized surgery and intensive care. Two months later, she is now able to walk again and take the trip back to her family in Haiti. We follow her journey, and meet the doctor who made it all happen.

    And U.S. forces withdraw from what was once considered the front lines in Afghanistan.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (4/20/2010) The bayous of Louisiana are an enchanting brew of water, land, plants and animals, but this distinctive part of America is disappearing quickly. With the mighty Mississippi bottled up behind man-made levees, the marshes that protect the bayous are no longer being replenished with the river mud that has sustained them for centuries. The Gulf of Mexico is encroaching, washing away wetlands, killing the bayous with salt water and putting an entire way of life at risk.

    Also, the story of a 12-year-old Haitian girl who is one of the few Haitians allowed into the U.S. for medical reasons. Through an unlikely series of circumstances, she was air-lifted from Haiti and flown to Florida, where she received specialized surgery and intensive care. Two months later, she is now able to walk again and take the trip back to her family in Haiti. We follow her journey, and meet the doctor who made it all happen.

    And U.S. forces withdraw from what was once considered the front lines in Afghanistan.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 15

    Where There's Smoke...

    (5/4/2010) An investigation into what may be the next Gulf War syndrome. Several years ago, otherwise healthy soldiers started coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan literally gasping for breath. Their doctors were at a loss to explain conditions normally found in people decades older. But now there are some who believe that these illnesses are the direct result of the air breathed in from hundreds of military “burn pits,” burning hazardous materials -- including batteries, computers, paint and even human body parts.
    Also, two views of the aftermath of the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico: fishermen in Louisiana who fear their livelihood will never return, and Native Alaskans who are trying to stop drilling coming to their shores. They hope the tragedy in the Gulf of Mexico is a game changer for their cause.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (5/4/2010) An investigation into what may be the next Gulf War syndrome. Several years ago, otherwise healthy soldiers started coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan literally gasping for breath. Their doctors were at a loss to explain conditions normally found in people decades older. But now there are some who believe that these illnesses are the direct result of the air breathed in from hundreds of military “burn pits,” burning hazardous materials -- including batteries, computers, paint and even human body parts.
    Also, two views of the aftermath of the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico: fishermen in Louisiana who fear their livelihood will never return, and Native Alaskans who are trying to stop drilling coming to their shores. They hope the tragedy in the Gulf of Mexico is a game changer for their cause.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 16

    Voting With Their Feet

    (5/11/2010) In the past few years, tens of thousands of Afghans have fled war and poverty in their own country and headed for Europe - with dreams of a better life. But many of them have become trapped in Greece, a country with problems of its own. While Greece is suffering from a severe economic crisis, thousands of Afghan migrants are living in conditions almost as dire as the ones they left. With no legal status in Greece, they sleep in public parks, struggle to find work, and worship in underground mosques. They are mostly ignored by the Greek government – that is, until they try to leave.
    Also, rape victims often undergo an invasive exam to collect any biological evidence a rapist may have left behind. They assume this evidence will be processed quickly and that every effort will be made to find their assailant. But that is not case. In fact, much of the evidence remains unanalyzed and is stacking up in labs across the country. As a result, thousands of rapists remain on the loose.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    (5/11/2010) In the past few years, tens of thousands of Afghans have fled war and poverty in their own country and headed for Europe - with dreams of a better life. But many of them have become trapped in Greece, a country with problems of its own. While Greece is suffering from a severe economic crisis, thousands of Afghan migrants are living in conditions almost as dire as the ones they left. With no legal status in Greece, they sleep in public parks, struggle to find work, and worship in underground mosques. They are mostly ignored by the Greek government – that is, until they try to leave.
    Also, rape victims often undergo an invasive exam to collect any biological evidence a rapist may have left behind. They assume this evidence will be processed quickly and that every effort will be made to find their assailant. But that is not case. In fact, much of the evidence remains unanalyzed and is stacking up in labs across the country. As a result, thousands of rapists remain on the loose.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 17

    Pornland Oregon

    (5/18/2010) Each year hundreds of thousands of adolescent girls are manipulated into America's illegal sex trade. It’s considered by many to be modern day slavery and it’s happening big time in a city you might not expect…Portland, Oregon.
    Surrounded by rivers and majestic mountains, the picturesque city of Portland is often referred to as a model American city. But there is another side to Portland, a seedier side. The city has more strip clubs per capita than Las Vegas, and with all-nude shows and numerous sex stores, Portland has been dubbed "pornland".
    It's not surprising that where you find strip clubs and sex stores, you'll most likely find prostitutes. But what is surprising, is that Portland is becoming a major center for underage trafficking. Our investigation found a growing number of teenage girls being pressured into prostitution by smooth talking “boyfriends”, aka pimps, who wine and dine them before forcing them to sell their bodies on the street or sites like Craigslist.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (5/18/2010) Each year hundreds of thousands of adolescent girls are manipulated into America's illegal sex trade. It’s considered by many to be modern day slavery and it’s happening big time in a city you might not expect…Portland, Oregon.
    Surrounded by rivers and majestic mountains, the picturesque city of Portland is often referred to as a model American city. But there is another side to Portland, a seedier side. The city has more strip clubs per capita than Las Vegas, and with all-nude shows and numerous sex stores, Portland has been dubbed "pornland".
    It's not surprising that where you find strip clubs and sex stores, you'll most likely find prostitutes. But what is surprising, is that Portland is becoming a major center for underage trafficking. Our investigation found a growing number of teenage girls being pressured into prostitution by smooth talking “boyfriends”, aka pimps, who wine and dine them before forcing them to sell their bodies on the street or sites like Craigslist.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 18

    Up To Their Ashes

    (5/25/2010) Dan Rather Reports travels to Iceland where the volcano Eyjafjallajökull has disrupted travel across Europe. Immediately underneath the volcano and its ash cloud, Icelandic farmers are also facing spiraling losses. Volcano and glacier experts say that Iceland's unique geography could mean that global warming and the melting of the island's glaciers - many of which cover active volcanoes - could lead to more frequent and more powerful eruptions in the future. Meanwhile, glaciers in Greenland are melting -- fast. Scientists explain what this could mean for sea levels in the rest of the world.
    Also, a conversation with an innovator who has some revolutionary ideas for Wall Street. Barry Silbert, the 34 year old founder and CEO of SecondMarket, has created the first centralized, e-Bay-style marketplace, for financial illiquid assets.
    Plus, an update on our investigation into sex trafficking of children in Portland, Oregon. Legislation could get kids off the streets and provide federal dollars to provide shelter.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (5/25/2010) Dan Rather Reports travels to Iceland where the volcano Eyjafjallajökull has disrupted travel across Europe. Immediately underneath the volcano and its ash cloud, Icelandic farmers are also facing spiraling losses. Volcano and glacier experts say that Iceland's unique geography could mean that global warming and the melting of the island's glaciers - many of which cover active volcanoes - could lead to more frequent and more powerful eruptions in the future. Meanwhile, glaciers in Greenland are melting -- fast. Scientists explain what this could mean for sea levels in the rest of the world.
    Also, a conversation with an innovator who has some revolutionary ideas for Wall Street. Barry Silbert, the 34 year old founder and CEO of SecondMarket, has created the first centralized, e-Bay-style marketplace, for financial illiquid assets.
    Plus, an update on our investigation into sex trafficking of children in Portland, Oregon. Legislation could get kids off the streets and provide federal dollars to provide shelter.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 19

    Haul or High Water

    (6/8/2010) Over the past thirty years, trucking has exploded into a giant $650 billion industry that is very much the lifeblood of our economy.
    But the big rigs that once embodied the workingman’s American dream have become what one economist calls sweatshops on wheels. We’ll find out why truckers are working 90-hour weeks and going broke -- while consumers are pocketing big savings and Wall Street investors are banking big profits. It’s a story about true American grit and hardworking people....free markets and fading hopes.
    Tonight you’ll experience long haul life first hand because we’re riding shotgun with a truck driving man. So climb aboard, buckle up…

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (6/8/2010) Over the past thirty years, trucking has exploded into a giant $650 billion industry that is very much the lifeblood of our economy.
    But the big rigs that once embodied the workingman’s American dream have become what one economist calls sweatshops on wheels. We’ll find out why truckers are working 90-hour weeks and going broke -- while consumers are pocketing big savings and Wall Street investors are banking big profits. It’s a story about true American grit and hardworking people....free markets and fading hopes.
    Tonight you’ll experience long haul life first hand because we’re riding shotgun with a truck driving man. So climb aboard, buckle up…

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 20

    Face-Off

    (6/15/2010) In June 2009, the Supreme Court issued a ruling in Melendez-Diaz v. Massachusetts that made headlines and had prosecutors screaming that it
    could bring drug prosecutions to a grinding halt nationwide: prosecutors could no longer use certificates to prove that a substance is drugs. Instead, they have to call the crime lab analyst as a witness in every trial. As quickly as the case entered the headlines, it
    disappeared, and no journalist has taken a rigorous look at what the effects of the case have actually been, until this special report. Reporting from Virginia, where the effect has been particularly pronounced, guest correspondent Dahlia Lithwick of Slate Magazine looks at both sides of the story, and then sits down for an in-depth conversation about the Supreme Court with Dan Rather.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes

    (6/15/2010) In June 2009, the Supreme Court issued a ruling in Melendez-Diaz v. Massachusetts that made headlines and had prosecutors screaming that it
    could bring drug prosecutions to a grinding halt nationwide: prosecutors could no longer use certificates to prove that a substance is drugs. Instead, they have to call the crime lab analyst as a witness in every trial. As quickly as the case entered the headlines, it
    disappeared, and no journalist has taken a rigorous look at what the effects of the case have actually been, until this special report. Reporting from Virginia, where the effect has been particularly pronounced, guest correspondent Dahlia Lithwick of Slate Magazine looks at both sides of the story, and then sits down for an in-depth conversation about the Supreme Court with Dan Rather.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes
    • EPISODE 21

    A Gulf in Understanding

    (6/22/2010) The oil gushing in the Gulf of Mexico has dominated the nation's attention, and everybody wants answers. But one of the striking and frightening realities of this disaster is how little we know. Dan Rather travels to the Gulf to talk to the scientists who are rushing to understand what has become an uncontrolled experiment with dire consequences. Where will all this oil go in the coming weeks and months? How much of it is lurking in giant clouds thousands of feet below the surface? Will it enter the food chain? These are just a few of the countless questions for which there are no good answers. That's because so little is known about the deep ocean where the blowout has spewed millions of gallons of oil and gas. One NASA scientist says the surface of the moon is better understood than the sea floor of the Gulf.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    (6/22/2010) The oil gushing in the Gulf of Mexico has dominated the nation's attention, and everybody wants answers. But one of the striking and frightening realities of this disaster is how little we know. Dan Rather travels to the Gulf to talk to the scientists who are rushing to understand what has become an uncontrolled experiment with dire consequences. Where will all this oil go in the coming weeks and months? How much of it is lurking in giant clouds thousands of feet below the surface? Will it enter the food chain? These are just a few of the countless questions for which there are no good answers. That's because so little is known about the deep ocean where the blowout has spewed millions of gallons of oil and gas. One NASA scientist says the surface of the moon is better understood than the sea floor of the Gulf.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 22

    Spiritually Bankrupt

    (6/29/2010) Dan Rather Reports investigates how the Roman Catholic Church has been hiding and shielding assets from victims of priest abuse. From the Vatican on down, the church has vowed to make peace with hundreds of victims of a decades-long epidemic of sex abuse by its priests. But we found evidence that the church has done just the opposite: wealthy U.S. Dioceses from California to Delaware have claimed to be broke and have filed for bankruptcy to avoid paying damages; Bishops have exploited arcane corporate laws to shield church assets from liability; and, in San Diego, parish priests have been caught literally hiding money in safes, according to court records. Critics say the Church is behaving more like a big corporation than a sacred institution.
    And also, a tale of money, liquor, and lobbyists that reaches from the halls of Congress to the beaches of the Caribbean. That’s where a modern day Rum War is brewing, with millions of your tax dollars at stake.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (6/29/2010) Dan Rather Reports investigates how the Roman Catholic Church has been hiding and shielding assets from victims of priest abuse. From the Vatican on down, the church has vowed to make peace with hundreds of victims of a decades-long epidemic of sex abuse by its priests. But we found evidence that the church has done just the opposite: wealthy U.S. Dioceses from California to Delaware have claimed to be broke and have filed for bankruptcy to avoid paying damages; Bishops have exploited arcane corporate laws to shield church assets from liability; and, in San Diego, parish priests have been caught literally hiding money in safes, according to court records. Critics say the Church is behaving more like a big corporation than a sacred institution.
    And also, a tale of money, liquor, and lobbyists that reaches from the halls of Congress to the beaches of the Caribbean. That’s where a modern day Rum War is brewing, with millions of your tax dollars at stake.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 23

    Return to Base

    (7/20/2010) For the better part of a year photographer Lucian Read embedded with the 4th infantry division 4th combat brigade during their one year deployment in Afghanistan. We were there for their homecoming in Fort
    Carson, Colorado and afterward sat down with some of the soldiers for a round table discussion before an audience of troops and their families. Also, vignettes from our time embedded with the soldiers.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (7/20/2010) For the better part of a year photographer Lucian Read embedded with the 4th infantry division 4th combat brigade during their one year deployment in Afghanistan. We were there for their homecoming in Fort
    Carson, Colorado and afterward sat down with some of the soldiers for a round table discussion before an audience of troops and their families. Also, vignettes from our time embedded with the soldiers.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 24

    What Happened Next: Congressman Grayson

    (8/3/2010) An update on our story on Medicare fraud. Medicare has been a lifesaver for millions of Americans, but with billions of dollars in payments going out every year, there's room for fraud. It's not too strong to say that Medicare is being plundered -- and cracking down on the problem has become a top priority. We examine how the Office of Inspector General is combating the fraud, and take an exclusive behind-the-scenes trip with a Strike Force team as they break up a Medicare crime ring.

    And also an update on the story we did about controversial Florida Congressman Alan Grayson. While the Federal Reserve is credited with bringing back the economy from the edge of collapse, it did so by literally "printing money" and injecting more than one trillion dollars into the system. Who got the money, and what were the terms of the loans? The Federal Reserve won't say, but Grayson has been working hard to force the Fed to open its books – and it looks like he may be getting his way.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (8/3/2010) An update on our story on Medicare fraud. Medicare has been a lifesaver for millions of Americans, but with billions of dollars in payments going out every year, there's room for fraud. It's not too strong to say that Medicare is being plundered -- and cracking down on the problem has become a top priority. We examine how the Office of Inspector General is combating the fraud, and take an exclusive behind-the-scenes trip with a Strike Force team as they break up a Medicare crime ring.

    And also an update on the story we did about controversial Florida Congressman Alan Grayson. While the Federal Reserve is credited with bringing back the economy from the edge of collapse, it did so by literally "printing money" and injecting more than one trillion dollars into the system. Who got the money, and what were the terms of the loans? The Federal Reserve won't say, but Grayson has been working hard to force the Fed to open its books – and it looks like he may be getting his way.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 25

    What Happened Next: Concussions

    (8/10/2010) Often referred to as a "ding" or "getting your bell rung" concussions are widely seen as something to just shake off. But the CDC has declared the millions of sports-related concussions that happen each year an epidemic. And many experts say they need to be taken a lot more seriously. We explore this issue throughout the country -- from inside the world's leading concussion clinic in Pittsburgh to the permanent damage suffered by one junior high football player in Seattle to evidence of the devastating effects of too many concussions on one NFL player at a nursing home in Maryland. The NFL has finally begun warning players about the dangers of concussions -- can the NCAA and our nation’s high schools be far behind?

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (8/10/2010) Often referred to as a "ding" or "getting your bell rung" concussions are widely seen as something to just shake off. But the CDC has declared the millions of sports-related concussions that happen each year an epidemic. And many experts say they need to be taken a lot more seriously. We explore this issue throughout the country -- from inside the world's leading concussion clinic in Pittsburgh to the permanent damage suffered by one junior high football player in Seattle to evidence of the devastating effects of too many concussions on one NFL player at a nursing home in Maryland. The NFL has finally begun warning players about the dangers of concussions -- can the NCAA and our nation’s high schools be far behind?

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 26

    What Happened Next: The Future of the Military

    (8/17/2010) The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and other new missions after the terrorist attacks on 9/11, have fundamentally changed the identity of the U.S. military. This hour looks back at four years of reporting on the armed forces to see how our troops are being deployed as diplomats as much as war fighters. Much of the change to the military culture has taken place without debate. But that is starting to change as the war in Afghanistan becomes less and less popular. With deficit concerns sweeping Washington, many are now looking to cut a military budget that once seemed untouchable, but has grown staggeringly over the last decade. U.S. military spending now accounts for nearly half of what all the countries in the world spend on their armed forces. The program includes a provocative interview with retired army colonel Douglas Macgregor, who has become a leading critic of current military policy and argues that the approach the U.S. takes on defense is long overdue for a radical re-think.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    (8/17/2010) The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and other new missions after the terrorist attacks on 9/11, have fundamentally changed the identity of the U.S. military. This hour looks back at four years of reporting on the armed forces to see how our troops are being deployed as diplomats as much as war fighters. Much of the change to the military culture has taken place without debate. But that is starting to change as the war in Afghanistan becomes less and less popular. With deficit concerns sweeping Washington, many are now looking to cut a military budget that once seemed untouchable, but has grown staggeringly over the last decade. U.S. military spending now accounts for nearly half of what all the countries in the world spend on their armed forces. The program includes a provocative interview with retired army colonel Douglas Macgregor, who has become a leading critic of current military policy and argues that the approach the U.S. takes on defense is long overdue for a radical re-think.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 27

    What Happened Next: Wolfman

    (8/24/2010) A look back at previous stories from northwest Montana, including the first wolf hunt for grey wolves, trapping giant grizzly bears and disappearing ice from Glacier National Park.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (8/24/2010) A look back at previous stories from northwest Montana, including the first wolf hunt for grey wolves, trapping giant grizzly bears and disappearing ice from Glacier National Park.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 28

    The Mysterious Case of Kevin Xu

    (9/14/2010) In March a Homeland Security official told Congress that counterfeit drugs were “a major growing health and safety issue.” That same month an FDA official testified that the pharmaceutical supply chain had become increasingly complex making “oversight significantly more difficult,” and leaving weaknesses through which counterfeit drugs might infiltrate the “legitimate supply chain.”
    Both these officials knew about Kevin Xu – a Chinese national who was caught trying to sell fake drugs to undercover agents in 2007. For the first time on TV we see the video agents made of Xu discussing how to avoid detection by customs, what kind of fake drugs he can provide and bragging how he’d never been caught.
    We also visit Nigeria where just a few years ago consumers were more likely to get a counterfeit drug than an authentic one. But nowadays Nigeria is making a concerted effort to purge fake medicine from their markets and is leading the charge against counterfeit drugs throughout the world.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (9/14/2010) In March a Homeland Security official told Congress that counterfeit drugs were “a major growing health and safety issue.” That same month an FDA official testified that the pharmaceutical supply chain had become increasingly complex making “oversight significantly more difficult,” and leaving weaknesses through which counterfeit drugs might infiltrate the “legitimate supply chain.”
    Both these officials knew about Kevin Xu – a Chinese national who was caught trying to sell fake drugs to undercover agents in 2007. For the first time on TV we see the video agents made of Xu discussing how to avoid detection by customs, what kind of fake drugs he can provide and bragging how he’d never been caught.
    We also visit Nigeria where just a few years ago consumers were more likely to get a counterfeit drug than an authentic one. But nowadays Nigeria is making a concerted effort to purge fake medicine from their markets and is leading the charge against counterfeit drugs throughout the world.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 29

    A Family Secret

    (9/21/2010) Despite decades of Western involvement in Afghanistan, an ancient practice that lies just below the surface has largely escaped the outside world. Through months of on-the-ground and investigative reporting, we were able to trace how some families go to extraordinary lengths to create a better future for their daughters – surprisingly, by disguising them as boys.
    One outstanding woman chose to step forward and offer an intimate portrait of her family. Azita Rafaat survived 30 years of war, a forced marriage, abuse and suicide attacks. She went on to become one of Afghanistan’s most powerful women, winning a seat in parliament. But not even a woman like Rafaat can escape Afghanistan’s repressive rules.
    Also, BP’s wellhead is closed and the ecological disaster of oil on beaches and wetlands largely didn’t happen. The government says much of the oil has been consumed by the gulf, but despite all the rosy talk, scientists are not ready to proclaim mission accomplished.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (9/21/2010) Despite decades of Western involvement in Afghanistan, an ancient practice that lies just below the surface has largely escaped the outside world. Through months of on-the-ground and investigative reporting, we were able to trace how some families go to extraordinary lengths to create a better future for their daughters – surprisingly, by disguising them as boys.
    One outstanding woman chose to step forward and offer an intimate portrait of her family. Azita Rafaat survived 30 years of war, a forced marriage, abuse and suicide attacks. She went on to become one of Afghanistan’s most powerful women, winning a seat in parliament. But not even a woman like Rafaat can escape Afghanistan’s repressive rules.
    Also, BP’s wellhead is closed and the ecological disaster of oil on beaches and wetlands largely didn’t happen. The government says much of the oil has been consumed by the gulf, but despite all the rosy talk, scientists are not ready to proclaim mission accomplished.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 30

    Take This Job and Love It

    (9/28/2010) Hardliners on the left and the right say that a program that allows U.S. companies to hire foreign workers legally will be the silver bullet for illegal immigration. Guest workers, they say, are a win-win solution. And the model for such a system already exists. A rare, up close look into a little-known guest worker program that raises big questions not only about our immigration policy but also the future of an economy increasingly dependent on foreign labor.
    Also, when great white sharks showed up unexpectedly on the New England coast, it got everyone’s attention. Marine biologists jumped at the opportunity to study a shark whose behavior is largely unknown – a rare, inside look into the world of the East Coast great whites.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes

    (9/28/2010) Hardliners on the left and the right say that a program that allows U.S. companies to hire foreign workers legally will be the silver bullet for illegal immigration. Guest workers, they say, are a win-win solution. And the model for such a system already exists. A rare, up close look into a little-known guest worker program that raises big questions not only about our immigration policy but also the future of an economy increasingly dependent on foreign labor.
    Also, when great white sharks showed up unexpectedly on the New England coast, it got everyone’s attention. Marine biologists jumped at the opportunity to study a shark whose behavior is largely unknown – a rare, inside look into the world of the East Coast great whites.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 31

    Goin' To Guam

    (10/5/2010) In 2014, 8,600 marines and their families will move from Okinawa, Japan to Guam, USA. In many ways Guam would seem like the perfect place to build a marine base. This tropical U.S. territory is strategically located near Asia, its residents are incredibly patriotic and the island has a long history with the Marine Corps.
    After all, it was the marines who liberated Guam from a brutal Japanese occupation during WWII; many Guamanians still feel a debt to America for saving them from Japanese rule. And yet, despite Guamanians’ reverence for Marines and their loyalty to the U.S., this realignment has been anything but smooth. The island may simply be unable to support the large population that will come with a new base.
    We take the viewer from the massive protests against the marines in Okinawa, to a corner of the U.S. rarely visited by the media or fellow Americans. Also an update on our Emmy award winning Iran money laundering story.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (10/5/2010) In 2014, 8,600 marines and their families will move from Okinawa, Japan to Guam, USA. In many ways Guam would seem like the perfect place to build a marine base. This tropical U.S. territory is strategically located near Asia, its residents are incredibly patriotic and the island has a long history with the Marine Corps.
    After all, it was the marines who liberated Guam from a brutal Japanese occupation during WWII; many Guamanians still feel a debt to America for saving them from Japanese rule. And yet, despite Guamanians’ reverence for Marines and their loyalty to the U.S., this realignment has been anything but smooth. The island may simply be unable to support the large population that will come with a new base.
    We take the viewer from the massive protests against the marines in Okinawa, to a corner of the U.S. rarely visited by the media or fellow Americans. Also an update on our Emmy award winning Iran money laundering story.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 32

    All I Want Is Work

    (10/12/2010) It's conventional wisdom that there are some jobs Americans just won't do -- jobs that have to be filled by foreign workers. But that conventional wisdom is being put to the test in the farm fields of southern Georgia. We discovered that in rural Colquitt County, there hundreds of unemployed Americans who say they're ready, willing and able to do this back breaking work, but they aren't getting a chance because the vegetable farms prefer to import foreign guest workers. The farmers say they're just trying to stay in business, the local job-seekers says they're being discriminated against for being American.
    Also an interview with Georgia senator Saxby Chambliss who has sponsored legislation expanding the guest worker farm program. And a look back at the history of foreign workers coming to American to work the land.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (10/12/2010) It's conventional wisdom that there are some jobs Americans just won't do -- jobs that have to be filled by foreign workers. But that conventional wisdom is being put to the test in the farm fields of southern Georgia. We discovered that in rural Colquitt County, there hundreds of unemployed Americans who say they're ready, willing and able to do this back breaking work, but they aren't getting a chance because the vegetable farms prefer to import foreign guest workers. The farmers say they're just trying to stay in business, the local job-seekers says they're being discriminated against for being American.
    Also an interview with Georgia senator Saxby Chambliss who has sponsored legislation expanding the guest worker farm program. And a look back at the history of foreign workers coming to American to work the land.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 33

    Field of Broken Dreams

    (10/19/2010) An investigation into an American pastime and the big business that runs it. That business is Major League Baseball and no country produces more baseball talent outside of the United States than the Dominican Republic. Despite the Dominican Republic’s relatively small size, the multi-billion dollar business of Major League Baseball would suffer without the pipeline of prospects this country produces.
    With dreams of making it big in the U.S. like mega-star Dominican athletes Pedro Martinez or David Ortiz, many children see baseball as a chance to hit the jackpot in a land with almost no other economic opportunities. In the Dominican Republic baseball dollars can be seen everywhere-- and kids will sacrifice everything, including an education, to get them.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    (10/19/2010) An investigation into an American pastime and the big business that runs it. That business is Major League Baseball and no country produces more baseball talent outside of the United States than the Dominican Republic. Despite the Dominican Republic’s relatively small size, the multi-billion dollar business of Major League Baseball would suffer without the pipeline of prospects this country produces.
    With dreams of making it big in the U.S. like mega-star Dominican athletes Pedro Martinez or David Ortiz, many children see baseball as a chance to hit the jackpot in a land with almost no other economic opportunities. In the Dominican Republic baseball dollars can be seen everywhere-- and kids will sacrifice everything, including an education, to get them.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 34

    Das Vote

    (10/26/2010) The upcoming midterm election will be historic, not because of the outcome of the vote, but the way we vote. For the first time, all 50 states will use some form of electronic voting machines to tally the ballots.
    In recent years, the U.S. and a number of countries abroad have rushed to replace old style voting, like punch cards and paper ballots with computers -- so-called e-voting machines that are said to record votes faster and more accurately.
    During the past eight years, the government has funneled nearly $4 billion to states to buy electronic machines. But in Europe, where the machines have also been used, computer savvy activists have raised serious questions about the machines…questions that cut to the very essence of a democracy -- namely, how can the public be sure every electronic vote is counted and what’s to stop someone from hacking into the e-voting machines?
    Also, one American's fight against voting machines in his state.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes

    (10/26/2010) The upcoming midterm election will be historic, not because of the outcome of the vote, but the way we vote. For the first time, all 50 states will use some form of electronic voting machines to tally the ballots.
    In recent years, the U.S. and a number of countries abroad have rushed to replace old style voting, like punch cards and paper ballots with computers -- so-called e-voting machines that are said to record votes faster and more accurately.
    During the past eight years, the government has funneled nearly $4 billion to states to buy electronic machines. But in Europe, where the machines have also been used, computer savvy activists have raised serious questions about the machines…questions that cut to the very essence of a democracy -- namely, how can the public be sure every electronic vote is counted and what’s to stop someone from hacking into the e-voting machines?
    Also, one American's fight against voting machines in his state.

    • CC
    • 48 Minutes
    • EPISODE 35

    Govt. 2.0

    (11/2/2010) Barack Obama’s presidential campaign was recognized, even by his political critics, for its innovative use of technology to rally voter support. But there are people out there who say that technology has the power to not only revolutionize campaigns, but the very way we view government. It’s a movement called 2.0 and Tim O’Reilly, known as "the Oracle of Silicon Valley,” is one of its most vocal prophets. O’Reilly saw the potential of the world wide web years before most of us had even heard of it and he believes we are at the vanguard of a radical re-think of how government works in the Internet age.
    Also, an interview with author and Russian expert Dr. Stephen Cohen about the impact of Russia’s history on today’s world.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes

    (11/2/2010) Barack Obama’s presidential campaign was recognized, even by his political critics, for its innovative use of technology to rally voter support. But there are people out there who say that technology has the power to not only revolutionize campaigns, but the very way we view government. It’s a movement called 2.0 and Tim O’Reilly, known as "the Oracle of Silicon Valley,” is one of its most vocal prophets. O’Reilly saw the potential of the world wide web years before most of us had even heard of it and he believes we are at the vanguard of a radical re-think of how government works in the Internet age.
    Also, an interview with author and Russian expert Dr. Stephen Cohen about the impact of Russia’s history on today’s world.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 36

    Here Comes the Cash

    (11/9/2010) Ever since President Obama scolded the Supreme Court for its Citizens United decision, Democrats have been making a big political issue out of the case that gave more free-speech rights to unions, some non-profits and businesses. It's no wonder, since outside dollars facilitated by the decision go two to one for Republicans.
    It's true that 2010 saw more spending by independent groups than the last midterms, and some candidates on both sides worry they can lose control of their message when groups with their own agendas take over the role of convincing voters how to vote. But how much does Citizens United really have to do with all this? We talk to two legal experts who have some surprising areas of agreement, including that the problem has little to do with Citizens United.
    We also visit the campaigns of Senators Russ Feingold and Jim Renacci as they battle against massive spending by outside groups to defeat them.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (11/9/2010) Ever since President Obama scolded the Supreme Court for its Citizens United decision, Democrats have been making a big political issue out of the case that gave more free-speech rights to unions, some non-profits and businesses. It's no wonder, since outside dollars facilitated by the decision go two to one for Republicans.
    It's true that 2010 saw more spending by independent groups than the last midterms, and some candidates on both sides worry they can lose control of their message when groups with their own agendas take over the role of convincing voters how to vote. But how much does Citizens United really have to do with all this? We talk to two legal experts who have some surprising areas of agreement, including that the problem has little to do with Citizens United.
    We also visit the campaigns of Senators Russ Feingold and Jim Renacci as they battle against massive spending by outside groups to defeat them.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 37

    Shell Game

    (11/16/2010) The issue of food safety was brought to light again this summer with the recall of millions of eggs from a farmer with a very bad record. His name is Jack DeCoster, and he’s been in trouble many times before. He was labeled a habitual violator in Iowa and he’s paid numerous fines in other states to avoid scrutiny. But the FDA didn’t have the power to stop him as he jumped from state to state.
    But that may soon change. Congress is considering legislation that for the first time in decades would strengthen the authority of the agencies in charge of monitoring our food - because at this point who’s guarding the hen house is up for debate.
    Also, we go inside a farm that's trying to satisfy both safety concerns and animal rights activists. It’s the first of its kind in the country and may be the beginning of a new trend in food safety.
    And, in remembrance of Veteran’s Day we pay tribute to Bill Millin, who may very well be the last man ever to lead an army into battle playing the bagpipes.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (11/16/2010) The issue of food safety was brought to light again this summer with the recall of millions of eggs from a farmer with a very bad record. His name is Jack DeCoster, and he’s been in trouble many times before. He was labeled a habitual violator in Iowa and he’s paid numerous fines in other states to avoid scrutiny. But the FDA didn’t have the power to stop him as he jumped from state to state.
    But that may soon change. Congress is considering legislation that for the first time in decades would strengthen the authority of the agencies in charge of monitoring our food - because at this point who’s guarding the hen house is up for debate.
    Also, we go inside a farm that's trying to satisfy both safety concerns and animal rights activists. It’s the first of its kind in the country and may be the beginning of a new trend in food safety.
    And, in remembrance of Veteran’s Day we pay tribute to Bill Millin, who may very well be the last man ever to lead an army into battle playing the bagpipes.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 38

    True Believers

    (12/7/2010) For over a century, the Catholic Church has played a role in shaping American society. In the late 1960s, it looked like an open, less dogmatic view of Catholicism would shape the Vatican for years to come. But without much fanfare or notice in the press, the Church has recently become more conservative. The story has broken onto the front pages only once, in 2009, when Pope Benedict rescinded the excommunications of the leaders of a group called the Priestly Society of Saint Pius X, or SSPX. One of them was a Holocaust denier, and uproar threatened Catholic-Jewish relations. But the uproar over one crazy clergyman died down without anyone examining the real story: what did the Pope's overtures towards SSPX mean for the future of the Church? We go inside SSPX, interviewing its leader, Bishop Bernard Fellay, whose excommunication was also lifted. We also spend time with a liberal Catholic community in Minneapolis called the Spirit of Saint Stephen's. The Vatican thinks they strayed too far from Catholic law, and around the same time it was beginning dialogue with SSPX, it told Spirit of Saint Stephen's to shape up, or get out of the church where they'd been practicing for 40 years. With this new conservative vision taking hold, reformers who had hoped for a more modern Church, are wondering whether they belong.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    (12/7/2010) For over a century, the Catholic Church has played a role in shaping American society. In the late 1960s, it looked like an open, less dogmatic view of Catholicism would shape the Vatican for years to come. But without much fanfare or notice in the press, the Church has recently become more conservative. The story has broken onto the front pages only once, in 2009, when Pope Benedict rescinded the excommunications of the leaders of a group called the Priestly Society of Saint Pius X, or SSPX. One of them was a Holocaust denier, and uproar threatened Catholic-Jewish relations. But the uproar over one crazy clergyman died down without anyone examining the real story: what did the Pope's overtures towards SSPX mean for the future of the Church? We go inside SSPX, interviewing its leader, Bishop Bernard Fellay, whose excommunication was also lifted. We also spend time with a liberal Catholic community in Minneapolis called the Spirit of Saint Stephen's. The Vatican thinks they strayed too far from Catholic law, and around the same time it was beginning dialogue with SSPX, it told Spirit of Saint Stephen's to shape up, or get out of the church where they'd been practicing for 40 years. With this new conservative vision taking hold, reformers who had hoped for a more modern Church, are wondering whether they belong.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 39

    Home Loans From Hell

    (12/14/2010) America is facing a foreclosure tsunami -- a quarter of all homeowners in America are delinquent on their mortgages. By the end of this year, foreclosure notices will have been sent to more than three million homes....and a second wave is predicted.
    The country’s largest mortgage servicers -- banks who service home loans -- have been battered in the headlines and on Capitol Hill for allegations of ‘robo-signing’ and using fraudulent documents to foreclose. But that could be the tip of the iceberg. A little-reported and little-understood aspect to the foreclosure crisis, claim consumer advocates, is that foreclosure is in fact very profitable for the banks. The banks dispute this, but we’ve been talking to homeowners across the country who say their servicers pushed them into foreclosure instead of modifying their loans. And the government-led effort to stop foreclosures could be making the problem worse.
    Also, economist Gary Shilling on when he expects the U.S. economy to rebound.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes

    (12/14/2010) America is facing a foreclosure tsunami -- a quarter of all homeowners in America are delinquent on their mortgages. By the end of this year, foreclosure notices will have been sent to more than three million homes....and a second wave is predicted.
    The country’s largest mortgage servicers -- banks who service home loans -- have been battered in the headlines and on Capitol Hill for allegations of ‘robo-signing’ and using fraudulent documents to foreclose. But that could be the tip of the iceberg. A little-reported and little-understood aspect to the foreclosure crisis, claim consumer advocates, is that foreclosure is in fact very profitable for the banks. The banks dispute this, but we’ve been talking to homeowners across the country who say their servicers pushed them into foreclosure instead of modifying their loans. And the government-led effort to stop foreclosures could be making the problem worse.
    Also, economist Gary Shilling on when he expects the U.S. economy to rebound.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 40

    The Best of 2010

    (12/21/2010) Highlights from some of our many investigations in 2010.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes

    (12/21/2010) Highlights from some of our many investigations in 2010.

    • CC
    • 51 Minutes
    • EPISODE 41

    A Border Runs Through It

    (3/24/2009) Few of the thousands of people crossing the Pakistan-Afghanistan border every day are searched or checked. And an Afghan border region where NATO reconstruction efforts are paying off. Also, a conversation on President Obama's recent trip to Russia with scholar Stephen Cohen.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    (3/24/2009) Few of the thousands of people crossing the Pakistan-Afghanistan border every day are searched or checked. And an Afghan border region where NATO reconstruction efforts are paying off. Also, a conversation on President Obama's recent trip to Russia with scholar Stephen Cohen.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
© 2010 HDNet LLC

More Seasons in Series

Viewers Also Bought

Top Nonfiction Shows