Description

Emmy-award winner and veteran journalist Dan Rather brings hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness, and guts in their reporting. The program covers topics including, but not limited to, politics, the environment, the global economy, and international affairs and conflicts. Dan Rather Reports is dictated by the needs of individual stories. Each show often consists of multiple stories; some shows will be devoted to a single, hour-long report.

    • $29.99

Description

Emmy-award winner and veteran journalist Dan Rather brings hard-edged field reports, in-depth interviews and investigative pieces that emphasize accuracy, fairness, and guts in their reporting. The program covers topics including, but not limited to, politics, the environment, the global economy, and international affairs and conflicts. Dan Rather Reports is dictated by the needs of individual stories. Each show often consists of multiple stories; some shows will be devoted to a single, hour-long report.

    • EPISODE 1

    The Commander

    1/6/09 As the war in Afghanistan moved further and further into the heart of American foreign policy, Dan Rather travels to Kabul to speak with commanding general of Western forces, General David McKiernan about the challenges as he sees them and the way ahead. Following the discussion, we travel to the Afghan-Pakistan border province of Khowst to see what life is like for American soldiers on the front-lines. While there we witness a suicide bombing aimed at their small outpost and a gun fight where US and Afghan soldiers and police skirmish with Taliban fighters across the border in Pakistan. Finally, we return to Kabul for a visit to a Red Cross orthopedic hospital where war amputees come to try to rebuild their broken bodies and their broken lives.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    1/6/09 As the war in Afghanistan moved further and further into the heart of American foreign policy, Dan Rather travels to Kabul to speak with commanding general of Western forces, General David McKiernan about the challenges as he sees them and the way ahead. Following the discussion, we travel to the Afghan-Pakistan border province of Khowst to see what life is like for American soldiers on the front-lines. While there we witness a suicide bombing aimed at their small outpost and a gun fight where US and Afghan soldiers and police skirmish with Taliban fighters across the border in Pakistan. Finally, we return to Kabul for a visit to a Red Cross orthopedic hospital where war amputees come to try to rebuild their broken bodies and their broken lives.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 2

    War Without End

    1/13/09 As fighting in the Gaza Strip flares, we travel to Israel and the Palestinian territories to examine the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians over this small strip of land, and to ask what the war means for American foreign policy. We speak with Israelis and Palestinians who represent a range of viewpoints -- from the most dovish, to the most hawkish, about their thoughts on the war and the future of Middle East peace. Also, meet the founder of J Street, a Jewish American lobbying organization which is trying to change the American Israeli dynamic as the conflict on the Israeli/Gaza border rages. Critics call him naïve, but he says it's possible to support Israel and still be critical of its actions, and doing so may be the only path to peace. And an interview with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright about her experience as a diplomat, her critiques of the Bush Administration, and the advice she would give to Barack Obama about Middle East policy.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes

    1/13/09 As fighting in the Gaza Strip flares, we travel to Israel and the Palestinian territories to examine the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians over this small strip of land, and to ask what the war means for American foreign policy. We speak with Israelis and Palestinians who represent a range of viewpoints -- from the most dovish, to the most hawkish, about their thoughts on the war and the future of Middle East peace. Also, meet the founder of J Street, a Jewish American lobbying organization which is trying to change the American Israeli dynamic as the conflict on the Israeli/Gaza border rages. Critics call him naïve, but he says it's possible to support Israel and still be critical of its actions, and doing so may be the only path to peace. And an interview with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright about her experience as a diplomat, her critiques of the Bush Administration, and the advice she would give to Barack Obama about Middle East policy.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes
    • EPISODE 3

    A Dream Fulfilled

    1/20/09 A look at the inauguration of President Barack Obama from unique perspectives. The complicated history of race in Washington, D.C. is woven together with the voices of a group from Memphis, Tennessee who are coming to witness history. Memphis was the site of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Now, more than three decades later, a church group is looking to put the past behind them as they welcome a new African-American icon. Also, a candid and emotional conversation with civil rights pioneer Benjamin Hooks. And, “Green Guru,” Van Jones, takes viewers to a green technology training location and explains why investing in a green future is the solution to stimulating the economy, the country, and job creation.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    1/20/09 A look at the inauguration of President Barack Obama from unique perspectives. The complicated history of race in Washington, D.C. is woven together with the voices of a group from Memphis, Tennessee who are coming to witness history. Memphis was the site of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Now, more than three decades later, a church group is looking to put the past behind them as they welcome a new African-American icon. Also, a candid and emotional conversation with civil rights pioneer Benjamin Hooks. And, “Green Guru,” Van Jones, takes viewers to a green technology training location and explains why investing in a green future is the solution to stimulating the economy, the country, and job creation.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 4

    Target: Philippines

    1/27/09 When it comes to the War on Terror, the battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan have gotten most of the attention. But the U.S. military has been active in many countries, especially the Philippines. This round table discussion, cut together with field reports, delves into this overlooked battlefield. A general in charge of Special Forces, the former U.S. ambassador, and a leading academic discuss America's complex relationship with the country and how some of the successes and concerns of U.S. forces could serve as a lesson for other hot spots.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    1/27/09 When it comes to the War on Terror, the battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan have gotten most of the attention. But the U.S. military has been active in many countries, especially the Philippines. This round table discussion, cut together with field reports, delves into this overlooked battlefield. A general in charge of Special Forces, the former U.S. ambassador, and a leading academic discuss America's complex relationship with the country and how some of the successes and concerns of U.S. forces could serve as a lesson for other hot spots.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 5

    The Castle Doctrine

    2/3/09 To shoot or not to shoot? That is the critical question underlying this groundbreaking hour-long report on the new breed of gun laws sweeping the country. Since 2005, 24 states have expanded the rights of civilians to use deadly force by enacting so-called, “castle doctrine" laws. Sponsored by the National Rifle Association, these laws are taking hold with unprecedented speed and bi-partisan support, rapidly redrawing the line between killing that's justified and killing that's murder.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    2/3/09 To shoot or not to shoot? That is the critical question underlying this groundbreaking hour-long report on the new breed of gun laws sweeping the country. Since 2005, 24 states have expanded the rights of civilians to use deadly force by enacting so-called, “castle doctrine" laws. Sponsored by the National Rifle Association, these laws are taking hold with unprecedented speed and bi-partisan support, rapidly redrawing the line between killing that's justified and killing that's murder.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 6

    Yankee, Go Home!

    2/10/09 U.S. -Bolivian relations reached a historic low-point when President Evo Morales expelled U.S. DEA agents from his country. From Bolivia's cocaine centers, we report on how unpopular U.S. counter-narcotics policies backfired and gave rise to the anti-American, coca-friendly Morales. Our cameras capture a raid of one of countless hidden forest cocaine labs, and a wholesale and legal coca market. Also, an investigation into a little-known corner of Ft. Benning, where police and military from across Latin America have trained for decades at U.S. taxpayers’ expense. The question is, what kind of training? The academy has a reputation for teaching soldiers from countries with histories of repression, to be even deadlier. And a wide-ranging conversation with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan William B. Wood. The discussion covers the current state of the Afghan War and gives an overview on the cultural, geographic, and historical complexities facing Western forces in Afghanistan.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    2/10/09 U.S. -Bolivian relations reached a historic low-point when President Evo Morales expelled U.S. DEA agents from his country. From Bolivia's cocaine centers, we report on how unpopular U.S. counter-narcotics policies backfired and gave rise to the anti-American, coca-friendly Morales. Our cameras capture a raid of one of countless hidden forest cocaine labs, and a wholesale and legal coca market. Also, an investigation into a little-known corner of Ft. Benning, where police and military from across Latin America have trained for decades at U.S. taxpayers’ expense. The question is, what kind of training? The academy has a reputation for teaching soldiers from countries with histories of repression, to be even deadlier. And a wide-ranging conversation with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan William B. Wood. The discussion covers the current state of the Afghan War and gives an overview on the cultural, geographic, and historical complexities facing Western forces in Afghanistan.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 7

    SOLD!

    2/17/09 Rising unemployment, weak home prices and an increasing foreclosure crisis, are threatening families, cities and the entire U.S. economy. We speak to Harvard law professor, and bankruptcy specialist, Elizabeth Warren, who has studied the economy and foreclosures and their dramatic, long term effect on the middle class of the United States. Also, what happens to all those houses that are repossessed by the banks? They are often auctioned off to the highest bidder. A huge home auction in Fort Myers, Florida takes place over three days while just a few miles away families line up at a food kitchen. Learn how the great recession has created a surprising and burgeoning problem in the wealthiest nation on earth – hunger.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    2/17/09 Rising unemployment, weak home prices and an increasing foreclosure crisis, are threatening families, cities and the entire U.S. economy. We speak to Harvard law professor, and bankruptcy specialist, Elizabeth Warren, who has studied the economy and foreclosures and their dramatic, long term effect on the middle class of the United States. Also, what happens to all those houses that are repossessed by the banks? They are often auctioned off to the highest bidder. A huge home auction in Fort Myers, Florida takes place over three days while just a few miles away families line up at a food kitchen. Learn how the great recession has created a surprising and burgeoning problem in the wealthiest nation on earth – hunger.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 8

    Knocking Heads

    3/3/09 Often referred to as a "ding" or "getting your bell rung" concussions are widely seen as something to just shake off. But the CDC has declared the millions of sports-related concussions that happen each year an epidemic. And many experts say they need to be taken a lot more seriously. That's something 16-year old Zack Lystedt whose life dramatically changed in one junior high football game learned the hard way. From inside the world's leading concussion clinic in Pittsburgh to Radio Row at the Super bowl to evidence of the devastating effects too many concussions can have on NFL players at a nursing home in Maryland. This hour long report tells the story of athletes and the injury you can't see.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    3/3/09 Often referred to as a "ding" or "getting your bell rung" concussions are widely seen as something to just shake off. But the CDC has declared the millions of sports-related concussions that happen each year an epidemic. And many experts say they need to be taken a lot more seriously. That's something 16-year old Zack Lystedt whose life dramatically changed in one junior high football game learned the hard way. From inside the world's leading concussion clinic in Pittsburgh to Radio Row at the Super bowl to evidence of the devastating effects too many concussions can have on NFL players at a nursing home in Maryland. This hour long report tells the story of athletes and the injury you can't see.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 9

    Meltdown

    3/10/09 A look at how the isolated country of Iceland turned itself from a modest fishing nation into the world's largest hedge fund; by betting it all, and then lose big as the global credit crisis hit. The country's bankruptcy was followed by the first revolution in Icelandic history when Icelanders kicked out the government; making it the first to fall as a consequence of the world's financial meltdown. Also, an interview with Dr. Mark Zandi, the chief economist and co-founder of moodyseconomy.com, who discusses how close the U.S. came to a complete economic shutdown in the Fall of 2008. And we’ve all heard about big banks behaving recklessly. But surprisingly, in cities and towns across the country, a number of small community banks are actually doing well. In many cases, and in particular with banks such as 175-year-old Hingham Institution for Savings in Massachusetts, it’s because they had a simple formula that hinged on a word the big banks didn't say often enough – that word is no.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    3/10/09 A look at how the isolated country of Iceland turned itself from a modest fishing nation into the world's largest hedge fund; by betting it all, and then lose big as the global credit crisis hit. The country's bankruptcy was followed by the first revolution in Icelandic history when Icelanders kicked out the government; making it the first to fall as a consequence of the world's financial meltdown. Also, an interview with Dr. Mark Zandi, the chief economist and co-founder of moodyseconomy.com, who discusses how close the U.S. came to a complete economic shutdown in the Fall of 2008. And we’ve all heard about big banks behaving recklessly. But surprisingly, in cities and towns across the country, a number of small community banks are actually doing well. In many cases, and in particular with banks such as 175-year-old Hingham Institution for Savings in Massachusetts, it’s because they had a simple formula that hinged on a word the big banks didn't say often enough – that word is no.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 10

    The Swedish Model

    3/31/09 We go to Stockholm to look at how Sweden was able to sort out their bank collapse in the 1990's -- in a way that was recently championed by several members of Congress as a way to avoid just handing over both a large chunk of emergency cash and power to the U.S. banks that were deemed too big to fail. Also, it was a simple five page memo released by the White House on a Friday afternoon. But when Washington's 15,000 lobbyists learned they would be banned from meetings where the distribution of the $787 billion stimulus bill would be discussed, K Street erupted. We sit down with a number of lobbyists to get their take on "the memo," and the role of lobbyists in DC. And New York is home to many of the financial institutions receiving bailout money and they are asking employees to cut spending. But cutting back in NY means something very different than it does in the rest of the country - executives are being forced to give up their chauffeured cars and instead, hail lowly, yellow cabs.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    3/31/09 We go to Stockholm to look at how Sweden was able to sort out their bank collapse in the 1990's -- in a way that was recently championed by several members of Congress as a way to avoid just handing over both a large chunk of emergency cash and power to the U.S. banks that were deemed too big to fail. Also, it was a simple five page memo released by the White House on a Friday afternoon. But when Washington's 15,000 lobbyists learned they would be banned from meetings where the distribution of the $787 billion stimulus bill would be discussed, K Street erupted. We sit down with a number of lobbyists to get their take on "the memo," and the role of lobbyists in DC. And New York is home to many of the financial institutions receiving bailout money and they are asking employees to cut spending. But cutting back in NY means something very different than it does in the rest of the country - executives are being forced to give up their chauffeured cars and instead, hail lowly, yellow cabs.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 11

    Meat Market

    4/7/09 In an interconnected economy, the failure of one business threatens the well being of many others. Our report focuses on one narrow strand of the beef industry, and how dwindling expense accounts by New York tycoons sends ripples from their upscale haunt, the 21 Club, to the beef wholesaler in the Bronx, to the Nebraska cattle rancher more than 1,000 miles away. Also, in October of 2008, Congress passed the Emergency Stabilization Act, to help banks in trouble and to stabilize the economy. Lawmakers set up an Oversight Panel to track the funds. They chose the distinguished Harvard Law professor, Elizabeth Warren, to chair the panel. We speak to her about where the money is going, how it's being spent, and the prospect of too-big-to-fail banks, being bailed out in the first place. And, as the price tag for the stimulus and financial bailouts added up, mathematician John Paulos gives an irreverent perspective on what all these big numbers really mean.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    4/7/09 In an interconnected economy, the failure of one business threatens the well being of many others. Our report focuses on one narrow strand of the beef industry, and how dwindling expense accounts by New York tycoons sends ripples from their upscale haunt, the 21 Club, to the beef wholesaler in the Bronx, to the Nebraska cattle rancher more than 1,000 miles away. Also, in October of 2008, Congress passed the Emergency Stabilization Act, to help banks in trouble and to stabilize the economy. Lawmakers set up an Oversight Panel to track the funds. They chose the distinguished Harvard Law professor, Elizabeth Warren, to chair the panel. We speak to her about where the money is going, how it's being spent, and the prospect of too-big-to-fail banks, being bailed out in the first place. And, as the price tag for the stimulus and financial bailouts added up, mathematician John Paulos gives an irreverent perspective on what all these big numbers really mean.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 12

    Everyone's Covered

    4/14/09 Graduate students at the University of British Columbia’s journalism graduate school take a look at how Canada provides all its citizens with health insurance. Canada spends about half as much per person as the US on health care and yet Canadians live longer than Americans. Also, the rich fields of California’s Central Valley have been the first rung of the economic ladder for hundreds of thousands of Americans and immigrants ever since the Great Depression. We take a look at how things are holding up during the nation’s worst economic downturn in decades. And a discussion with Fouad Ajami, one of the world's leading experts on the Middle East, who talks about the effect of the global recession on the Middle East, whether President Obama can change attitudes of Arabs and Muslims towards the U.S., and whether the war in Afghanistan is worth fighting for.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    4/14/09 Graduate students at the University of British Columbia’s journalism graduate school take a look at how Canada provides all its citizens with health insurance. Canada spends about half as much per person as the US on health care and yet Canadians live longer than Americans. Also, the rich fields of California’s Central Valley have been the first rung of the economic ladder for hundreds of thousands of Americans and immigrants ever since the Great Depression. We take a look at how things are holding up during the nation’s worst economic downturn in decades. And a discussion with Fouad Ajami, one of the world's leading experts on the Middle East, who talks about the effect of the global recession on the Middle East, whether President Obama can change attitudes of Arabs and Muslims towards the U.S., and whether the war in Afghanistan is worth fighting for.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 13

    Busted

    4/21/09 No has been spared in the economic downturn. Not even Las Vegas, Nevada, proving that in these tough times even the city that bills itself as “recession proof” can go bust. We visit the individuals who make up this young city, who came to Las Vegas in search of the American dream. From exotic dancers trying to earn a living, to struggling families who are about to be evicted from their homes. Some are optimistic, believing that there’s light at the end of the tunnel, while others are trying to stay afloat despite 100,000 people being out of work, and home values being dropped close to 50%. We bring you their stories as they unfold, some promising, others not so much.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    4/21/09 No has been spared in the economic downturn. Not even Las Vegas, Nevada, proving that in these tough times even the city that bills itself as “recession proof” can go bust. We visit the individuals who make up this young city, who came to Las Vegas in search of the American dream. From exotic dancers trying to earn a living, to struggling families who are about to be evicted from their homes. Some are optimistic, believing that there’s light at the end of the tunnel, while others are trying to stay afloat despite 100,000 people being out of work, and home values being dropped close to 50%. We bring you their stories as they unfold, some promising, others not so much.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 14

    Revolt

    4/28/09 When the federal government began doling out billions of stimulus dollars to the states last year, Virginia was the first to say "no thank you," despite its record unemployment rate. We travel to one of the state's hardest hit towns to gauge reaction among employers -- and the unemployed -- to the House of Delegates' controversial decision. Also, the academic community calls it food security but when you're working several jobs just to make ends meet, it might better be called food in-security. Hunger knows no borders, affects all races and religions and plagues big cities and small towns – we visit the mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania where they're auctioning food -- to the lowest bidder. And on the picturesque wind-swept plains of northern Afghanistan, a population weary from drought that has devastated agriculture needs to be fed. We travel with the Red Cross to see how aid is delivered and why it’s so necessary

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    4/28/09 When the federal government began doling out billions of stimulus dollars to the states last year, Virginia was the first to say "no thank you," despite its record unemployment rate. We travel to one of the state's hardest hit towns to gauge reaction among employers -- and the unemployed -- to the House of Delegates' controversial decision. Also, the academic community calls it food security but when you're working several jobs just to make ends meet, it might better be called food in-security. Hunger knows no borders, affects all races and religions and plagues big cities and small towns – we visit the mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania where they're auctioning food -- to the lowest bidder. And on the picturesque wind-swept plains of northern Afghanistan, a population weary from drought that has devastated agriculture needs to be fed. We travel with the Red Cross to see how aid is delivered and why it’s so necessary

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 15

    Operation Helmet

    5/5/09 We investigate allegations that the helmet pads used by the Army and Marines in Iraq and Afghanistan are endangering American soldiers' lives -- all because the better helmets are being sold by Dr. Bob Meaders, a gadfly whom the military brass doesn’t like. We talk to Meaders, the soldiers who've worn both pads, and to the manufacturers of the pads currently in use. Also, thousands of young marines trained at Camp Lejeune for the day when they would serve and perhaps sacrifice for their country. But what they didn't know was that many of them may also have been sacrificing their health by drinking what turned out to be some of the most highly contaminated water this country has ever seen. And what's most shocking is that Camp Lejeune officials allegedly knew their water was contaminated, yet it took them years to close the wells.
    And we document the amazing journey of a group of 5th graders from the Bronx to Germany and Austria where they tackle the history of the Holocaust.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    5/5/09 We investigate allegations that the helmet pads used by the Army and Marines in Iraq and Afghanistan are endangering American soldiers' lives -- all because the better helmets are being sold by Dr. Bob Meaders, a gadfly whom the military brass doesn’t like. We talk to Meaders, the soldiers who've worn both pads, and to the manufacturers of the pads currently in use. Also, thousands of young marines trained at Camp Lejeune for the day when they would serve and perhaps sacrifice for their country. But what they didn't know was that many of them may also have been sacrificing their health by drinking what turned out to be some of the most highly contaminated water this country has ever seen. And what's most shocking is that Camp Lejeune officials allegedly knew their water was contaminated, yet it took them years to close the wells.
    And we document the amazing journey of a group of 5th graders from the Bronx to Germany and Austria where they tackle the history of the Holocaust.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 16

    Power from the People

    5/12/09 As the Obama administration pursues a new environmental and energy agenda, we profile countries that have already taken the lead in alternative energy development. It's clear the United States has a lot of catching up to do. We travel to Germany, where entire cities have embraced solar energy and the concept of a 'feed-in tariff" to incentivize citizens to build their own green power sources. From there, we venture to the oil-soaked sands of the United Arab Emirates, where plans are underway to build the world's first carbon-neutral city, and back in the U.S we speak to veteran environmentalist and technologist Denis Hayes about how the alternative energy movement lost momentum in the Reagan era.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    5/12/09 As the Obama administration pursues a new environmental and energy agenda, we profile countries that have already taken the lead in alternative energy development. It's clear the United States has a lot of catching up to do. We travel to Germany, where entire cities have embraced solar energy and the concept of a 'feed-in tariff" to incentivize citizens to build their own green power sources. From there, we venture to the oil-soaked sands of the United Arab Emirates, where plans are underway to build the world's first carbon-neutral city, and back in the U.S we speak to veteran environmentalist and technologist Denis Hayes about how the alternative energy movement lost momentum in the Reagan era.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 17

    The Raid on Imam Sahib

    5/19/09 From the aftermath of a suicide bombing at a hospital in the Taliban stronghold of Kandahar, to the site of a disputed raid in northern Afghanistan, to the flight line at the main U.S. airbase in the region, this hour-long report considers the complex realities of civilian casualties in Afghanistan from all angles. The deaths of civilians in war are always personal tragedies, but in an already tenuous counter insurgency like the one being waged in Afghanistan, American military leaders know they can threaten the entire war effort.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    5/19/09 From the aftermath of a suicide bombing at a hospital in the Taliban stronghold of Kandahar, to the site of a disputed raid in northern Afghanistan, to the flight line at the main U.S. airbase in the region, this hour-long report considers the complex realities of civilian casualties in Afghanistan from all angles. The deaths of civilians in war are always personal tragedies, but in an already tenuous counter insurgency like the one being waged in Afghanistan, American military leaders know they can threaten the entire war effort.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 18

    Rethinking Russia

    6/2/09 In this sneak-preview of our hour on Guantanamo Bay, we present viewers with exclusive glimpses inside Guantanamo Bay and controversial new allegations from the first American television interview with Lakhdar Boumediene -- the detainee whose lawsuit went to the Supreme Court and granted his fellow detainees access to the American court system. Also, Dan Rather sits down with a trio of experts to explore a vital element of foreign policy and its long, complex relationship with the United States: Russia. Professor Stephen Cohen, Dmitri Trenin and Ariel Cohen address important policy concerns currently facing the two nations and share their thoughts on the new road ahead.


    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    6/2/09 In this sneak-preview of our hour on Guantanamo Bay, we present viewers with exclusive glimpses inside Guantanamo Bay and controversial new allegations from the first American television interview with Lakhdar Boumediene -- the detainee whose lawsuit went to the Supreme Court and granted his fellow detainees access to the American court system. Also, Dan Rather sits down with a trio of experts to explore a vital element of foreign policy and its long, complex relationship with the United States: Russia. Professor Stephen Cohen, Dmitri Trenin and Ariel Cohen address important policy concerns currently facing the two nations and share their thoughts on the new road ahead.


    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 19

    7 Years Inside Gitmo

    6/9/09 With the debate about whether -- and how -- to close down Guantanamo raging on the cable channels and in the opinion pages, we take a tour of the "new" Guantanamo, and feature the first American television interview with Lakhdar Boumediene, a detainee who challenged the Bush Administration before the Supreme Court, and won. We hear about his seven year ordeal, including allegations of torture. We take a behind the scenes look at Guantanamo today, where the commander in charge denies all of Boumediene’s allegations.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    6/9/09 With the debate about whether -- and how -- to close down Guantanamo raging on the cable channels and in the opinion pages, we take a tour of the "new" Guantanamo, and feature the first American television interview with Lakhdar Boumediene, a detainee who challenged the Bush Administration before the Supreme Court, and won. We hear about his seven year ordeal, including allegations of torture. We take a behind the scenes look at Guantanamo today, where the commander in charge denies all of Boumediene’s allegations.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 20

    Private Prisons

    6/16/09 For 30 years, America's been waging a very lopsided battle on crime. Politicians push for new laws and new cops but balk at building new jails. That means a glut of inmates with nowhere to go, especially at the federal level. On an average night, there are nearly 90,000 people in federal custody awaiting trial, sentencing or deportation, but fewer than 25,000 jail beds to hold them. The rest are outsourced to a labyrinth of local jails and private prisons. Our report takes an unprecedented look into this massive game of musical beds, a detention system rife with turf wars, waste and profiteering. Also, hoping to fill local coffers and provide jobs, counties throughout Texas have spent over half-a-billion dollars to finance the construction of speculative detention facilities through the sale of a special type of municipal bond, called revenue bonds. But are these prisons, primarily run by private prison operators, truly benefiting these counties?

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    6/16/09 For 30 years, America's been waging a very lopsided battle on crime. Politicians push for new laws and new cops but balk at building new jails. That means a glut of inmates with nowhere to go, especially at the federal level. On an average night, there are nearly 90,000 people in federal custody awaiting trial, sentencing or deportation, but fewer than 25,000 jail beds to hold them. The rest are outsourced to a labyrinth of local jails and private prisons. Our report takes an unprecedented look into this massive game of musical beds, a detention system rife with turf wars, waste and profiteering. Also, hoping to fill local coffers and provide jobs, counties throughout Texas have spent over half-a-billion dollars to finance the construction of speculative detention facilities through the sale of a special type of municipal bond, called revenue bonds. But are these prisons, primarily run by private prison operators, truly benefiting these counties?

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 21

    Money Man to the World

    6/23/09 A full hour investigation into the biggest bailout yet; one which nobody's heard about -- how the International Monetary Fund bailed out entire countries in Eastern Europe last year; all with the help of U.S. taxpayer money; only to benefit wealthy Western European economies. We gained exclusive access to what many call the most powerful man in the world -- Dominique Strauss Khan, the French socialist who runs the IMF.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    6/23/09 A full hour investigation into the biggest bailout yet; one which nobody's heard about -- how the International Monetary Fund bailed out entire countries in Eastern Europe last year; all with the help of U.S. taxpayer money; only to benefit wealthy Western European economies. We gained exclusive access to what many call the most powerful man in the world -- Dominique Strauss Khan, the French socialist who runs the IMF.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 22

    A Conversation with Frank Rich

    8/4/09 Dan Rather and renowned New York Times columnist Frank Rich discuss war, health care, the economy and the Academy Awards.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    8/4/09 Dan Rather and renowned New York Times columnist Frank Rich discuss war, health care, the economy and the Academy Awards.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 23

    Up on the Farm

    8/11/09 From back lots to roof tops urban farming is exploding. Our round table discussion from a floating barge and hydroponic farm on the Hudson River sheds light on a unique plan for turning farming on its end, literally: it’s called vertical farming. But there's more to the story. Chickens on rooftops? We visit one urban family doing just that. And a look at a food pantry planting a seed to go beyond canned food - turning an abandoned lot into a farm plot.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    8/11/09 From back lots to roof tops urban farming is exploding. Our round table discussion from a floating barge and hydroponic farm on the Hudson River sheds light on a unique plan for turning farming on its end, literally: it’s called vertical farming. But there's more to the story. Chickens on rooftops? We visit one urban family doing just that. And a look at a food pantry planting a seed to go beyond canned food - turning an abandoned lot into a farm plot.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 24

    The Trailers - 4 Years Later

    8/18/09 In a follow-up to our extensive reporting on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, we take a look back at the role FEMA played in placing families into camper homes provided by the federal government-- homes that turned out to be toxic and contaminated with formaldehyde. We update you on the stories of those residents who became victims twice and their battle to have FEMA take responsibility for the fallout from the "toxic trailers."

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    8/18/09 In a follow-up to our extensive reporting on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, we take a look back at the role FEMA played in placing families into camper homes provided by the federal government-- homes that turned out to be toxic and contaminated with formaldehyde. We update you on the stories of those residents who became victims twice and their battle to have FEMA take responsibility for the fallout from the "toxic trailers."

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 25

    The Most Dangerous Place to Join a Union

    8/25/09 The Latin American nation of Colombia is only the United States’ 27th largest trading partner, but when it comes to American labor and industry’s showdown over U.S. trade policy, it’s priority #1. Pro-free-trade lobbyists see a trade with Colombia as a way to reward cooperation with American interests on the global stage; labor activists point to a pattern of horrific violence directed at labor organizers. Both sides see Colombia as a test case that will determine the fate of free trade agreements for years to come. We go deep into coal country in the north of this violent country, witness an act of terrorism, and interview victims and would-be protectors to try to get to the bottom of this complex issue.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes

    8/25/09 The Latin American nation of Colombia is only the United States’ 27th largest trading partner, but when it comes to American labor and industry’s showdown over U.S. trade policy, it’s priority #1. Pro-free-trade lobbyists see a trade with Colombia as a way to reward cooperation with American interests on the global stage; labor activists point to a pattern of horrific violence directed at labor organizers. Both sides see Colombia as a test case that will determine the fate of free trade agreements for years to come. We go deep into coal country in the north of this violent country, witness an act of terrorism, and interview victims and would-be protectors to try to get to the bottom of this complex issue.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes
    • EPISODE 26

    Electric Cars

    9/8/09 From California to New York – the next possible revolution in transportation… electric cars. This hour-long report looks at Telsa – the first electric car manufacturer. Also, industry insiders Dan Neil, Jim Motavalli, and Matt Debord weigh in on the future technology. Are electric cars the vehicle of the future?

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes

    9/8/09 From California to New York – the next possible revolution in transportation… electric cars. This hour-long report looks at Telsa – the first electric car manufacturer. Also, industry insiders Dan Neil, Jim Motavalli, and Matt Debord weigh in on the future technology. Are electric cars the vehicle of the future?

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes
    • EPISODE 27

    Iran's Manhattan Project

    9/15/09 Our investigation looks at how Iran has been able to evade sanctions and launder billions through western banks--enough to build nuclear weapon; and how American ally Dubai has become Iran’s commercial, cultural and financial gateway to the rest of the world. Also, at a time when Congress has seldom if ever been more partisanly divided, there are five U.S. senators who didn't receive a single vote to get into office. We meet George LeMieux of Florida, a Republican lawyer from Tallahassee who has never even held public office, yet he’ll be casting crucial votes at a time when the stakes couldn’t be higher.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes

    9/15/09 Our investigation looks at how Iran has been able to evade sanctions and launder billions through western banks--enough to build nuclear weapon; and how American ally Dubai has become Iran’s commercial, cultural and financial gateway to the rest of the world. Also, at a time when Congress has seldom if ever been more partisanly divided, there are five U.S. senators who didn't receive a single vote to get into office. We meet George LeMieux of Florida, a Republican lawyer from Tallahassee who has never even held public office, yet he’ll be casting crucial votes at a time when the stakes couldn’t be higher.

    • CC
    • 50 Minutes
    • EPISODE 28

    Taking on the Fed

    9/22/09 While the Federal Reserve is credited with bringing back the economy from the edge of collapse, it did so by literally "printing money" and injecting more than one trillion dollars into the system. Who got the money, and what were the terms of the loans? The Federal Reserve won't say, but Congressman Alan Grayson wants to force the Fed to open its books. Also, we join 1st Battalion 5th Marines as it takes part in Operation Strike of the Sword, one of the largest offensives of the Afghan War and the beginning of the Marines’ push to control Helmand Province. Later we rejoin the Marines as they and their civilian counterparts work to re-establish governance and bring security and prosperity to the people of Helmand’s Nawa District. The hour ends with a discussion between Dan Rather and the journalists who spent weeks reporting it.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    9/22/09 While the Federal Reserve is credited with bringing back the economy from the edge of collapse, it did so by literally "printing money" and injecting more than one trillion dollars into the system. Who got the money, and what were the terms of the loans? The Federal Reserve won't say, but Congressman Alan Grayson wants to force the Fed to open its books. Also, we join 1st Battalion 5th Marines as it takes part in Operation Strike of the Sword, one of the largest offensives of the Afghan War and the beginning of the Marines’ push to control Helmand Province. Later we rejoin the Marines as they and their civilian counterparts work to re-establish governance and bring security and prosperity to the people of Helmand’s Nawa District. The hour ends with a discussion between Dan Rather and the journalists who spent weeks reporting it.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 29

    Half the Sky

    10/6/09 A very special one-hour report from the 92nd Street Y in New York City; a conversation with authors Nicolas Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn about and their new book Half the Sky, which focuses on the global movement to empower women. Mr. Kristof and Ms. Wudunn are the first married couple to win a Pulitzer Prize, Mr. Kristof is a New York Times columnist and Ms. Wudunn is a former editor and journalist for The Times.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    10/6/09 A very special one-hour report from the 92nd Street Y in New York City; a conversation with authors Nicolas Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn about and their new book Half the Sky, which focuses on the global movement to empower women. Mr. Kristof and Ms. Wudunn are the first married couple to win a Pulitzer Prize, Mr. Kristof is a New York Times columnist and Ms. Wudunn is a former editor and journalist for The Times.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 30

    Tax Cheats

    10/13/09 Justice Department prosecutor Kevin Downing explains how people who have stashed money in unreported Swiss bank accounts have 48 hours to come forward. With the clock ticking on a new amnesty program, we learn about the massive fraud perpetrated by UBS that’ll put an end to Switzerland's tradition of bank secrecy. Also, a few decades ago, wolves were virtually nonexistent in most of the U.S., but since being added to the endangered species list, they have flourished. So much so that for the first time in years, it's now legal to hunt wolves in the Northern Rockies. The question is how to live with an animal that was hunted to near extinction - and one that some people never wanted back in the first place. And, in an economic downturn, those at the bottom of the ladder are the first to feel the pinch. So even as Wall Street bounces back, the ranks of the unemployed continue to grow. We look at both sides of the NY economy, meeting a Wall Street and a woman working hard to stay afloat.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes

    10/13/09 Justice Department prosecutor Kevin Downing explains how people who have stashed money in unreported Swiss bank accounts have 48 hours to come forward. With the clock ticking on a new amnesty program, we learn about the massive fraud perpetrated by UBS that’ll put an end to Switzerland's tradition of bank secrecy. Also, a few decades ago, wolves were virtually nonexistent in most of the U.S., but since being added to the endangered species list, they have flourished. So much so that for the first time in years, it's now legal to hunt wolves in the Northern Rockies. The question is how to live with an animal that was hunted to near extinction - and one that some people never wanted back in the first place. And, in an economic downturn, those at the bottom of the ladder are the first to feel the pinch. So even as Wall Street bounces back, the ranks of the unemployed continue to grow. We look at both sides of the NY economy, meeting a Wall Street and a woman working hard to stay afloat.

    • CC
    • 53 Minutes
    • EPISODE 31

    Queen of the Road

    10/20/09 We investigate the harrowing realities behind the tens of thousands of cut-rate student truck drivers hitting the road every year. Whistleblowers reveal how big fleets and shoddy driving schools are putting profits before safety, luring unsuspecting students into the pipeline of cheap driving labor. Also, for the first time ever, a scientist has sent AUVs - autonomous underwater vehicles - that he designed to the floor of the Arctic Ocean and brought back never before seen pictures - we get a first-hand look. And we revisit an interview with Iran's most wanted man, a terrorist leader who operates on Iran's eastern border with Pakistan. His latest suicide bombing attack had killed dozens of Iranian Revolutionary Guards; including the country's number two commanding general.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes

    10/20/09 We investigate the harrowing realities behind the tens of thousands of cut-rate student truck drivers hitting the road every year. Whistleblowers reveal how big fleets and shoddy driving schools are putting profits before safety, luring unsuspecting students into the pipeline of cheap driving labor. Also, for the first time ever, a scientist has sent AUVs - autonomous underwater vehicles - that he designed to the floor of the Arctic Ocean and brought back never before seen pictures - we get a first-hand look. And we revisit an interview with Iran's most wanted man, a terrorist leader who operates on Iran's eastern border with Pakistan. His latest suicide bombing attack had killed dozens of Iranian Revolutionary Guards; including the country's number two commanding general.

    • CC
    • 49 Minutes
    • EPISODE 32

    Pill Mills

    10/27/09 We investigate the shady dealings of certain so called “pain clinics” in Texas where a valid I.D., a little cash, and an excuse for pain will get you hundreds of potent pain killers. It’s all legal, and for some, coming at a deadly cost. Also, the most famous intersection in America, Times Square, gets a make-over. We step out into our own backyard to take a look at what Janette Sadik-Khan’s, the visionary behind Time’s Square new experiment and the Commissioner of NYC’s Department of Transportation, has been doing to turn this busy intersection into a pedestrian paradise.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    10/27/09 We investigate the shady dealings of certain so called “pain clinics” in Texas where a valid I.D., a little cash, and an excuse for pain will get you hundreds of potent pain killers. It’s all legal, and for some, coming at a deadly cost. Also, the most famous intersection in America, Times Square, gets a make-over. We step out into our own backyard to take a look at what Janette Sadik-Khan’s, the visionary behind Time’s Square new experiment and the Commissioner of NYC’s Department of Transportation, has been doing to turn this busy intersection into a pedestrian paradise.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 33

    Carbonomics

    11/3/09 An in depth investigation into the billions of dollars to be made from the environment by “offsetting" pollution." We travel from Europe to China and back to the United States to see if buying and selling the right to "pollute" is helping stop global warming, and uncover a massive loophole in the scheme that scientists and policy experts fear could undermine the effort to stop global warming.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes

    11/3/09 An in depth investigation into the billions of dollars to be made from the environment by “offsetting" pollution." We travel from Europe to China and back to the United States to see if buying and selling the right to "pollute" is helping stop global warming, and uncover a massive loophole in the scheme that scientists and policy experts fear could undermine the effort to stop global warming.

    • CC
    • 52 Minutes
    • EPISODE 34

    Truck Talk

    11/10/09 Part two of our investigation of the trucking industry takes us to Willie Nelson's legendary truck-stop in the heart of Texas for an open forum about living and working on the open road. Our panel of big rig industry experts and insiders sound off on hot button issues: sky-high driver turnover rates, a stone-cold freight market and of course, the student trucker controversy stirred up by part one of our series.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    11/10/09 Part two of our investigation of the trucking industry takes us to Willie Nelson's legendary truck-stop in the heart of Texas for an open forum about living and working on the open road. Our panel of big rig industry experts and insiders sound off on hot button issues: sky-high driver turnover rates, a stone-cold freight market and of course, the student trucker controversy stirred up by part one of our series.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 35

    Treasure Island

    11/17/09 Madagascar’s national parks are being plundered by thousands of locals who are illegally chopping down rare and extremely valuable rosewood trees. This investigative report has new, shocking video showing an ecological nightmare that is threatening one-of a kind species on an exotic island off the coast of Africa. Also, everyone is used to the convenience of the supermarket and a wide selection of produce year round - but what should a 21st century food system really look like? One Vermont town is sprouting an experiment to find out. Members of this community-wide farming circle describe what it takes to keep the process as local as possible from soil to seed, crop to compost.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes

    11/17/09 Madagascar’s national parks are being plundered by thousands of locals who are illegally chopping down rare and extremely valuable rosewood trees. This investigative report has new, shocking video showing an ecological nightmare that is threatening one-of a kind species on an exotic island off the coast of Africa. Also, everyone is used to the convenience of the supermarket and a wide selection of produce year round - but what should a 21st century food system really look like? One Vermont town is sprouting an experiment to find out. Members of this community-wide farming circle describe what it takes to keep the process as local as possible from soil to seed, crop to compost.

    • CC
    • 55 Minutes
    • EPISODE 36

    Afghanistan: One Last Chance

    12/8/09 On December 1, 2009, President Obama addressed the nation and the world from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point to announce a new strategy for the war in Afghanistan. One week later, this hour-long documentary looked at what the view of this new strategy was, from the battlefield, from Kabul, and from Washington, D.C. Dan Rather Reports travels to the eastern Afghan province where battle tactics are already changing dramatically. We also see how official Washington responds to the speech, in real time. And then back to Afghanistan for perspective from prominent politician Abdullah Abdullah and young soldiers who must fight on the front lines.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    12/8/09 On December 1, 2009, President Obama addressed the nation and the world from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point to announce a new strategy for the war in Afghanistan. One week later, this hour-long documentary looked at what the view of this new strategy was, from the battlefield, from Kabul, and from Washington, D.C. Dan Rather Reports travels to the eastern Afghan province where battle tactics are already changing dramatically. We also see how official Washington responds to the speech, in real time. And then back to Afghanistan for perspective from prominent politician Abdullah Abdullah and young soldiers who must fight on the front lines.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 37

    Mind Your Loan Business

    12/15/09 The recession has made retraining workers a growth industry. Vocational schools are booming -- especially trucking schools. Last year federal workforce programs trained over 13,000 new truckers. By official counts, these programs have stellar graduation rates and job placement, but our investigation reveals the untold story. For part three in our series on the trucking industry, we meet dozens of trucker trainees who say that instead of new skills and opportunities, their schooling steered them into financial ruin. Also, for the most part, investors go into the stock market knowing the risks - they know that if their investments drop in value, they have to live with the losses. But not all financial losses are a natural part of the ups and downs of the stock market, some investors are taken advantage of or even conned by their brokers. We take a look at a securities arbitration clinic, staffed by law students, which is devoted to helping small investors who've lost money due to their broker.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes

    12/15/09 The recession has made retraining workers a growth industry. Vocational schools are booming -- especially trucking schools. Last year federal workforce programs trained over 13,000 new truckers. By official counts, these programs have stellar graduation rates and job placement, but our investigation reveals the untold story. For part three in our series on the trucking industry, we meet dozens of trucker trainees who say that instead of new skills and opportunities, their schooling steered them into financial ruin. Also, for the most part, investors go into the stock market knowing the risks - they know that if their investments drop in value, they have to live with the losses. But not all financial losses are a natural part of the ups and downs of the stock market, some investors are taken advantage of or even conned by their brokers. We take a look at a securities arbitration clinic, staffed by law students, which is devoted to helping small investors who've lost money due to their broker.

    • CC
    • 54 Minutes
    • EPISODE 38

    The Best of 2009

    12/29/09 2009 was a big news year and a busy one for us at Dan Rather Reports. A look back at some of the best and most unusual stories of the year that passed.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes

    12/29/09 2009 was a big news year and a busy one for us at Dan Rather Reports. A look back at some of the best and most unusual stories of the year that passed.

    • CC
    • 56 Minutes
© HDNet

More Seasons in Series

Top Nonfiction Shows